Feed aggregator

Can legal marijuana survive the disapproving glare of Jeff Sessions?

Cannabist - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 22:00
The U.S. is not gearing up for a large-scale prosecution of legal marijuana users, according to initial indications from the dozen or so U.S. attorneys who are now authorized make that call.

Maine: Cannabis legalization Implementation Bill Public Hearing Tomorrow

Weed News - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 20:42
Below is a message that I received out of Maine today: The second half of the 128th Maine Legislature begins this week. Lawmakers will revisit the bill put forward by the MLI committee and attempt to...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

New DOJ marijuana policy sparks latest clash over states' rights

Cannabist - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 20:15
The federal government's position on state laws legalizing marijuana is only the latest high-profile states' rights fight.

More unauthorized stores selling CBD oil in Iowa

Cannabist - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 19:06
Unregulated sales of cannabis oil have been ramping up in Iowa even as state officials work to set up a tightly regulated distribution system for medical marijuana products.

Will 2018 Be A Big Year For The Sports Cannabis Movement?

Weed News - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 14:40
Last year was a big year for the sports cannabis movement. An ever-increasing number of professional athletes, both current and retired, are joining the movement in an effort to free the plant...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

Will Sessions’s anti-cannabis move actually help legalization? (Newsletter: Jan 8, 2017)

Marijuana Moment - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:42

Subscribe to receive Marijuana Moment’s newsletter in your inbox every weekday morning. It’s the best way to make sure you know which cannabis stories are shaping the day.

Another poll shows majority legalization support; Sessions & Gardner to meet; Lots of state bills filed

Your support makes Marijuana Moment possible…

I’m so appreciative for readers who recognize that newsgathering doesn’t just…happen. Keeping you as informed as possible about marijuana policy every day is what I do as a job, for a living, to support my family.

Monthly pledges from readers like this one provide the resources that make Marijuana Moment possible:

  • Tauhid Chappell of the Washington Post: “I pledged to support Tom Angell’s Marijuana Moment because he’s one of my go-to sources for a comprehensive understanding of all the key movements happening across the industry. From local, state, federal and beyond, his thorough coverage provides a wealth of insight that’s needed to truly feel like you’re on top of the chaotic shifts happening within the industry. I’m happy to support such an educational newsletter that always arrives in my inbox in a timely manner.”

If Marijuana Moment is an important part of how you keep track of cannabis developments — especially if it makes your own work in the industry or legalization movement any easier — please consider stepping up to help make sure this newsletter keeps showing up in your inbox every day.
http://patreon.com/marijuanamoment

/ TOP THINGS TO KNOW

A Pew poll found that Americans support legalizing marijuana, 61% – 37%.

I put together some thoughts about how U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s anti-marijuana move might actually be good for legalization.

U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO) says he told Sessions in a phone call that he will be blocking all Justice Department nominations over the Trump administration’s marijuana policy change. The two are set to meet this week. The nomination block threat stands to leave several key posts unfilled for the foreseeable future.

/ FEDERAL

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is working with California officials to formulate a response to the Trump administration’s anti-marijuana move.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs said Justice Department marijuana changes won’t affect government doctors’ ability to talk with veterans about cannabis.

Montana’s U.S. attorney said he would focus “on identifying and prosecuting those who create the greatest safety threats to our citizens and communities.”

Former U.S. Deputy Attorney General James Cole, who authored the Cole memo, spoke about its rescission.

A federal judge scheduled oral arguments in a lawsuit against marijuana’s Schedule I status for February 14.

President Trump said that countries with “harsh” drug policies see “less difficulty,” adding: “We are going to be working on that very, very hard this year, and I think we’re going to make a big dent into the drug problem.” He also tweeted that he spoke with Cabinet and military officials about “the ever increasing Drug and Opioid Problem.”

U.S. Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), chair of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, criticized Sessions’s anti-marijuana move and said that cannabis could become a campaign issue in 2018.

Congresswoman Jacky Rosen (D-NV), who is running against U.S. Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV), is making marijuana a campaign issue.

Members of Congress from Colorado held a conference call to discuss legislative responses to the Sessions marijuana move. U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet (D-CO) sent a letter asking the attorney general to rescind the anti-marijuana guidance, while Congressman Jared Polis (D-CO) sent a letter asking President Trump to overrule Sessions on cannabis.

U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan (R-AK) said the Sessions marijuana move could be an impetus for Congress to end prohibition.

Congressman Mark Meadows (R-NC) said he supports the Sessions policy change.

U.S. Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) cheered on the Sessions cannabis move, and also seems upset that some Democrats want to include broader state marijuana protections in appropriations legislation.

Congressman Rod Blum (R-IA) says Sessions’s anti-marijuana move inspired him to cosponsor cannabis legislation.

Former Congressman Ron Paul (R-TX) is calling on Sessions to resign.

/ STATES

New Jersey Gov.-elect Phil Murphy (D) and legislative leaders say they will continue with plans to legalize marijuana despite federal enforcement policy changes.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker (R) is concerned the federal government is sowing “confusion” about marijuana enforcement.

Oklahoma Democratic gubernatorial candidates are backing medical cannabis, but Republican contenders are mostly mum on the issue.

Louisiana is moving ahead to implement its medical cannabis program.

California’s attorney general is considering suing the federal government over marijuana policy. Separately, officials pulled a PSA on drugged driving after critics viewed it as pro-marijuana.

The New Mexico Supreme Court temporarily upheld hemp legislation vetoes by Gov. Susana Martinez (R).

Colorado regulators said they will continue to adhere to the principles of the Cole memo even though it is no longer in place. Separately, they are proposing changes to medical cannabis rules.

Missouri’s House speaker says that he’s surprised by momentum behind medical cannabis and that he’d prefer lawmakers pass legislation instead of having voters do it via a ballot initiative.

Indiana’s Republican majority floor leader introduced a resolution calling for a study on medical cannabis.

New York regulators say they will continue the state’s medical cannabis program in light of federal changes. Separately, lawmakers filed a bill to allow doctors to recommend medical marijuana for any condition.

Maine lawmakers will hold a hearing on marijuana legalization implementation legislation on Tuesday.

A Florida representative filed a marijuana decriminalization bill. Another representative introduced legislation setting procedures for medical cannabis use in schools.

A Mississippi representative filed a medical cannabis bill.

A Washington, D.C. councilmember, at the request of the mayor, introduced legislation to allow reciprocity for out-of-state medical cannabis patients.

Washington State regulators identified marijuana products with undisclosed pesticide residues. Separately, the House Committee on Commerce and Gaming will hear a bill to use marijuana tax revenue to fund indigent defense on Monday.

/ LOCAL

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) spoke out against the federal marijuana enforcement change.

San Francisco, California retailers began recreational marijuana sales.

/ ADVOCACY

Trump ally Roger Stone called the Justice Department’s marijuana policy change a “cataclysmic mistake.”

The National Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators also slammed the Sessions anti-cannabis move.

Purported criminal justice reform group Right on Crime cheered the Sessions decision.

Conservative commentator Ben Shapiro bashed cannabis consumers but said he supports decriminalization.

/ SCIENCE & HEALTH

A study concluded that “consumption of cannabis reduces vigilance and increases driving errors.”

A study found that medical cannabis “dispensary users do not necessarily reside in the same area in which dispensaries are located and do not necessarily reflect the local population.”

A study concluded that “there are higher proportions of personal communication tweets and Twitter users tweeting about rosin in U.S. states where cannabis is legalized.”

/ OPINION & ANALYSIS

The New York Times editorial board slammed U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s marijuana enforcement policy.

The Los Angeles Times editorial board wants Congress to overrule Sessions on cannabis.

Even the Washington Post editorial board, which has long opposed marijuana legalization, criticized the Justice Department action.

The Wall Street Journal editorial board supports Sessions’s anti-marijuana change, but said that it could spur Congress to end prohibition.

The Chicago Tribune editorial board is calling on Congress to end federal marijuana prohibition.

/ BUSINESS

Corona distributor Constellation Brands, which has marijuana investments, says it is not concerned about a federal crackdown.

Marijuana industry operatives don’t seemed too spooked by Sessions’s anti-marijuana move.

Environmentalists are concerned about the marijuana industry’s energy usage.

/ CULTURE     

Comedian Seth Meyers opened the Golden Globes by saying, “It’s 2018: marijuana is finally allowed and sexual harassment finally isn’t. It’s going to be a good year.”

Trump-supporting Dilbert cartoonist Scott Adams said he may turn on the president over the administration’s anti-cannabis move.

The post Will Sessions’s anti-cannabis move actually help legalization? (Newsletter: Jan 8, 2017) appeared first on Marijuana Moment.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions Has Made us Stronger

Weed News - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 00:53
Trump Attorney General Jeff Sessions Wants to Stifle the Cannabis Legalization Movement. He’s Only Made Us Stronger. “If you strike down the Cole Memo, we shall become more powerful than...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

America Declares War On Jeff Sessions’ Threatened War On Cannabis

Weed News - Sun, 01/07/2018 - 16:33
With his announcement that he is freeing federal prosecutors to go after marijuana operations in states where it is legal, Attorney General Jeff Sessions has excited strong bipartisan opposition...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

Sessions ignites nation with anti-marijuana ploy

The Leaf Online - Sun, 01/07/2018 - 15:52

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has rattled his saber of prohibition by threatening more federal marijuana prosecutions, reversing one of the few remaining policy holdovers from the Obama administration, stoking a firestorm of support for a variety of federal reforms. The famous “Cole Memo” was issued after Colorado and Washington legalized adult use of marijuana, when […]

The post Sessions ignites nation with anti-marijuana ploy appeared first on The Leaf Online.

Latino Legislators Reject Jeff Sessions’ Cannabis Directive

Weed News - Sat, 01/06/2018 - 17:30
The National Hispanic Caucus of State Legislators (NHCSL) firmly rejected a recent memorandum by Attorney General Jeff Sessions revoking Obama Administration policy that directed US...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

Study: Medical Cannabis Dispensaries Not Linked To Neighborhood Crime, Violence

Weed News - Sat, 01/06/2018 - 16:52
Retail stores that sell primarily alcohol and tobacco are associated with an increased prevalence of neighborhood crime, but medical cannabis dispensaries are not, according...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

New Pew Research Center Poll Finds 61% of American Voters Support Legalizing Marijuana

The Joint Blog - Sat, 01/06/2018 - 06:39
According to a new Pew Research Center (PRC) survey, more than six in 10 American voters support legalizing marijuana.

The survey, conducted in October and released today, finds that support for legalization has risen 4% from last year (57%), and has nearly doubled since 2000 (31%).

“As in the past, there are wide generational and partisan differences in views of marijuana legalization”, says Abigail Geiger from PRC . “Majorities of Millennials (70%), Gen Xers (66%) and Baby Boomers (56%) say the use of marijuana should be legal. Only among the Silent Generation does a greater share oppose (58%) than favor (35%) marijuana legalization.”

According to the poll, nearly seven in 10 Democrats say marijuana use should be legal, as do 65% of independents. By contrast, 43% of Republicans favor marijuana legalization, while 55% are opposed. Among Republicans and Republican-leaning independents, those younger than 40 favor legalizing marijuana use, 62% to 38%. Republicans ages 40 to 64 are divided (48% say it should be legal, 49% illegal), while those 65 and older oppose marijuana legalization by more than two-to-one (67% to 30%).

Sizable majorities of Democrats and Democratic leaners younger than 40 (79%) and 40 to 64 (70%) favor marijuana legalization. Older Democrats – those 65 and older – are more divided (50% favor legalization, 42% oppose it).

The poll comes just a day after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that he’s rescinding the Obama-era Cole Memo which directs federal law enforcement to respect states’ marijuana legalization laws.

The post New Pew Research Center Poll Finds 61% of American Voters Support Legalizing Marijuana appeared first on TheJointBlog.

California’s first legal sale honors cannabis activism

The Leaf Online - Fri, 01/05/2018 - 23:47

Long-term cannabis reform activists Chris Conrad and wife Mikki Norris were beaming as they made the first documented legal purchase of marijuana in California for non-medical personal adult use and paid its first recorded cannabis excise tax in Berkeley, Jan 1, 2018. “What we’re getting are three Jack Herer joints in honor of our friend […]

The post California’s first legal sale honors cannabis activism appeared first on The Leaf Online.

Democrats and Republicans Reject Recent Action by AG Sessions

NORML Blog - Fri, 01/05/2018 - 23:03

Following yesterday’s announcement by the DOJ that Attorney General Jeff Sessions had rescinded the Cole Memo, an Obama-era memorandum issued by Attorney General James Cole in 2013, federal lawmakers on both sides of the aisle quickly denounced the decision.

Reject AG Sessions’ Efforts to Revert to the Failed Criminal Policies of the ‘Just Say No’ Era

In addition to taking to the floor of the Senate to express his frustrations, Senator Cory Gardner (R-CO) continued to vent on Twitter. He had this to say:

“This reported action directly contradicts what Attorney General Sessions told me prior to his confirmation. With no prior notice to Congress, the Justice Department has trampled on the will of the voters in CO and other states.”

Sharing some of the same frustrations as her counterpart in the Senate, Representative Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) shared the following in a email to supporters:

“Sessions’ actions to protect the bottom lines of the for-profit private prison industry, and Big Pharma whose opioids and drugs flourish in part due to the marijuana prohibition, while trampling on states’ rights and turning everyday Americans into criminals, is the latest injustice that the Attorney General has suffered on the American people.”

Being the cosponsor of pending legislation, that if passed by Congress would stop AG Sessions in his tracks, Representative Gabbard also took a minute to encourage support for her bill, HR 1227:

“I am calling on every member of Congress to take up the Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act to remove marijuana from the list of federally controlled substances.”

With prominent Democrats and Republicans promising a fight and threatening to derail DOJ nominations, and thousands of calls and emails from activists asking lawmakers to reject Mr. Sessions’ misguided plan, it appears that political courage comes in many forms.

To join the fight, take a few minutes to contact your representative and encourage their support for HR 1227: The Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act: http://norml.org/action-center/item/federal-bill-introduced-to-end-federal-marijuana-prohibition and email Chapters@NORML.org for a list of upcoming meetings and lobby days.

Oklahoma: Voters To Decide In June On Sweeping Medical Marijuana Ballot Initiative

NORML Blog - Fri, 01/05/2018 - 20:39

Oklahoma voters will decide this June on State Question 788 — a statewide ballot measure legalizing the use, cultivation, and distribution of medical cannabis to qualified patients.

Oklahomans will vote on the issue on June 26 during the primary election. Republican Mary Fallin set the date via an executive proclamation, issued yesterday.

State Question 788 permits physicians to recommend cannabis therapy to patients at their discretion. Patients possessing a state-issued medical license are permitted to engage in cannabis possession or cultivation, or they purchase marijuana products from a licensed dispensary.

Initiative proponents gathered sufficient signatures to place the issue before voters in 2016. However, the vote was postponed because of litigation over contested ballot title language. In a 7 to 1 ruling in April, justices rejected the state attorney general’s rewording of the initiative’s ballot title, which proponents had argued was purposely misleading, and ordered that the measure’s initial language be restored.

Under Oklahoma law, the cultivation or distribution of cannabis is classified as a felony offense punishable by up to life in prison.

Proponents of separate statewide medical cannabis initiatives are gathering signatures in Missouri and Utah. Proponents of a medical marijuana initiative in South Dakota have turned in their signatures and are awaiting a review by the Secretary of State’s office. In November, proponents of a voter initiative effort to legalize and regulate the personal use and retail sale of cannabis in Michigan turned in more than 360,000 signatures in an effort to qualify the measure for the November 2018 ballot.

Why Sessions’s Anti-Marijuana Move Might Be Good For Legalization

Marijuana Moment - Fri, 01/05/2018 - 18:40

For the past several years, the marijuana industry and its customers have been relying on a piece of paper — an Obama-era document known as the Cole memo — to indulge in their business and pleasure mostly without fear of arrest by federal agents.

On Thursday, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded that document. Observers took it as a sign that a large-scale cannabis crackdown could be on the way.

But could Sessions’s move actually turn out to be good news for legalization supporters?

The development generated immediate and intense pushback from federal and state officials, from both sides of the aisle. And it wasn’t just the usual suspects of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus chiming in. Democratic and Republican House and Senate members who almost never talk about marijuana, except when asked about it, proactively released statements pushing back against Sessions.

Congressman Rod Blum, Republican of Iowa, for example, said that the attorney general’s action inspired him to sign on as a cosponsor of House legislation to let state set their own cannabis laws without federal interference.

Iowa has not legalized marijuana, and only has an extremely limited medical cannabis oil law on its books.

Because of @jeffsessions actions, I’m joining the “Respect State Marijuana Laws” bill. I believe in States' Rights & I’ve seen how cannabis derived medicines can stop seizures in a child, help a veteran cope with pain, or provide relief to a senior with glaucoma. #IA01

— Congressman Rod Blum (@RepRodBlum) January 5, 2018

Not surprisingly, lawmakers who represent state-legal marijuana businesses and consumers who are now at greater risk in a world without the Cole memo are also fired up.

Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi of California, the House Democratic leader, for example, issued a statement in response to the Sessions move saying that Congress should not only continue an existing budget rider that prevents the Justice Department from interfering with state medical cannabis laws but should expand its scope to protect full recreational laws as well.

“Congress must now take action to ensure that state law is respected, and that Americans who legally use marijuana are not subject to federal prosecution,” she said. “Democrats will continue to insist on bipartisan provisions in appropriations bills that protect Americans lawfully using medical marijuana. Congress should now consider expanding the provisions to cover those states that have decriminalized marijuana generally.

Similarly, Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon said that “any budget deal Congress considers in the coming days must build on current law to prevent the federal government from intruding in state-legal, voter-supported decisions.”

Republican Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado took to the Senate floor and issued a threat to block Trump administration nominees over the move.

.@SenCoryGardner on Attorney General Jeff Sessions' #marijuana policy change: "I will be holding all nominations for the Department of Justice. The people of Colorado deserve answers." pic.twitter.com/BnVEkA54ag

— CSPAN (@cspan) January 4, 2018

Likely 2020 Democratic presidential contenders rushed to beat one another to the punch in slamming the Trump administration’s anti-cannabis action.

Not a single member of Congress from either party issued a statement supporting the rescission of the Cole memo.

Whereas the marijuana industry has been operating in a sort of legal gray area under the Cole memo and the medical cannabis budget rider, the Sessions move forces marijuana to the forefront of American politics, where a breaking point may finally be reached.

While in the short-term, Sessions’s move has sent shock and fear through the cannabis community, caused stocks to tumble, spooked investors and gave banks greater pause about opening accounts for marijuana businesses, the disappearance of the Obama-era protections could actually have positive long-term implications.

Yes, DEA agents may raid some businesses. And federal prosecutors might bring some cannabis entrepreneurs to court. People in the cannabis industry could go to prison or have their assets seized.

Those actions could have long-lasting implications negative for those targeted. That’s nothing to take lightly, and no one in the legalization movement wants it to happen.

But by launching a crackdown in any form, Jeff Sessions’s Justice Department could spur a backlash — among the public and from federal, state and local officials whose job-creating, taxpaying constituents are being targeted.

And that could finally force a resolution to to the growing federal-state divide on marijuana that might otherwise persist longer in a murky gray area under the Cole memo and annual appropriations riders.

If Congress passes legislation to change cannabis’s status under federal law in the next year or two, legalization supporters may have Jeff Sessions to thank for it.

The post Why Sessions’s Anti-Marijuana Move Might Be Good For Legalization appeared first on Marijuana Moment.

Vermont State House Passes Marijuana Legalization

NORML Blog - Fri, 01/05/2018 - 15:58

Montpelier, Vermont: Just hours after US Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded Obama-era guidelines instructing US attorneys to take a ‘hands off’ approach in states with legal marijuana regulations, lawmakers in the Vermont House voted to legalize the personal possession and home cultivation of marijuana by a vote of 81 to 63. The measure now goes back to the Senate for a concurrence vote before going to the Governor, who has indicated that he will sign the bill into law.

Passage of legalization in Vermont in 2018 would be a legislative first. To date, all eight states that have enacted adult use regulatory laws, as well as the District of Columbia have done so by a direct vote of the people.

The progress in Vermont is groundbreaking. Should the Green Mountain State’s leadership move forward as promised, it will mark a huge turning point in the national movement to end the criminalization of marijuana. 

One in five Americans resides in a jurisdiction where the adult use of cannabis is legal under state statute, and the majority of citizens reside someplace where the medical use of cannabis is legally authorized. As is evidenced by Vermont lawmakers’ actions, it is clear that the Trump administration is not going to be able to cease this momentum in favor of the enactment of rational marijuana policies.

The political courage of Vermont’s lawmakers to break with nearly a century of legislative stagnation should be interpreted as a siren call in the halls of the state legislatures nationwide as well as the U.S. Capitol.

You can follow the progress of the legislation on our Vermont Action Alert by clicking here.

Trump administration ends Obama cannabis policy (Newsletter: Jan. 5, 2018)

Marijuana Moment - Fri, 01/05/2018 - 12:54

Subscribe to receive Marijuana Moment’s newsletter in your inbox every weekday morning. It’s the best way to make sure you know which cannabis stories are shaping the day.

VT House approves legalization bill; OK medical cannabis vote date set; Lawmakers push back on Sessions

Your support makes Marijuana Moment possible…

An anonymous reader who just became Marijuana Moment’s latest active supporter with a monthly pledge asked me to share her reasons for stepping up:

  • “While I was with family over the holidays, I found myself recommending Tom’s newsletter repeatedly — from my on-the-fence mom to my fully supportive best friend. Whether you’re just getting involved in marijuana policy or have been part of the movement for decades, it’s undeniable that Tom consistently does the fastest, most accurate marijuana news reporting in the U.S. I am always proud to support excellent, independent journalism, and Tom’s work tops that list for me.”

If you rely on Marijuana Moment to stay updated on the many cannabis news developments happening every day, please consider starting a pledge to support my work so I can keep doing this.

http://patreon.com/marijuanamoment

/ TOP THINGS TO KNOW

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded the Obama-era Cole memo that has generally allowed states to implement their own marijuana laws without federal interference.

The move represents a clear violation of President Trump’s repeated campaign promises to respect state cannabis laws.

A large number of members of Congress and state officials across party lines pushed back against the decision.

Vermont’s House of Representatives approved a marijuana legalization bill, setting up a final Senate vote next week.

/ FEDERAL

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders, asked about the federal marijuana move, said, “The president believes in enforcing federal law…that is regardless of what the topic is, whether it’s marijuana or it’s immigration.”

A U.S. Department of Justice spokesperson wasn’t willing to predict whether the marijuana change would lead to more prosecutions. The official also said there are no current plans to begin sending threat letters to state-legal cannabis businesses. However, an official also wouldn’t rule out medical cannabis prosecutions.

Colorado’s U.S. attorney suggested that the disappearance of the Cole memo wouldn’t change his marijuana enforcement strategy.

The U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Ohio implied that the Sessions move wouldn’t change much.

Vermont’s U.S. attorney also indicated she’s not about to launch a cannabis crackdown.

The same goes for the Western District of Washington’s U.S. attorney.

Oregon’s U.S. attorney suggested he would continue to use Cole memo priorities in determining enforcement actions.

Alaska’s U.S. attorney said he will “continue to use the long-established principles of federal prosecution to determine what cases to charge.”T

he U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia said the office will “utilize long-established principles of prosecutorial discretion in pursuing cases.”

Pennsylvania’s U.S. attorney said his office will continue going after “criminal organizations which traffic in all illegal controlled substances, including marijuana.”

The U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Arkansas said he will “continue to exercise our prosecutorial discretion and evaluate criminal cases on an individual basis.”

Rhode Island’s U.S. attorney said he would “evaluate each matter based upon its specific facts, and then rely upon the well-established principals that govern all federal prosecutions when deciding which cases to pursue.”

The Massachusetts U.S attorney said his office would “prosecute bulk cultivation and trafficking cases, and those who use the federal banking system illegally.”

The U.S. attorney in the Eastern District of California said the office will “evaluate violations of those laws in accordance with our district’s federal law enforcement priorities and resources.”

Former U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration head Chuck Rosenberg suggested the removal of the Cole memo wouldn’t change much.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) is responding to the federal marijuana change by pushing for even broader state protections in federal spending legislation than just the existing medical cannabis rider.

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) seems to want to extend budget protections to cover state recreational laws as well.

Congressman Earl Blumenaeur (D-OR) congratulated Vermont on its marijuana legalization vote.

The U.S. Senate bill to respect state medical cannabis laws got one new cosponsor, bringing the total to eight.

/ STATES

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin (R) placed a medical cannabis measure on the state’s June 26 primary election ballot.

Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee (D) said the state won’t amend its marijuana laws in response to federal enforcement policy changes.

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf (D) announced that regulators have approved that state’s first medical cannabis dispensary to begin serving patients.

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) says he wants the federal government to distinguish between medical and recreational marijuana.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D) said the state will move ahead with legal marijuana sales.

California’s top marijuana regulator and attorney general said the state will move ahead with legalization. And an assemblyman will file legislation to prevent state and local police from assisting federal agents in any cannabis crackdowns.

Massachusetts regulators are moving ahead with marijuana legalization implementation.

Ohio regulators said they would continue implementing the medical cannabis program despite federal changes.

Minnesota regulators said their medical cannabis program would continue as well.

The chair of Alaska’s Marijuana Control Board, who is a police chief, resigned in response to the federal move.

Illinois Democratic gubernatorial candidates JB Pritzker and Daniel Biss slammed the federal marijuana change.

Louisiana’s attorney general said he supports the move to scale back state marijuana protections.

Indiana’s attorney general also seemed pleased with the change.

New Jersey’s Senate president slammed the federal cannabis move.

A Maine legislative committee hearing on marijuana legalization implementation scheduled for Friday has been canceled.

/ LOCAL

Seattle, Washington Mayor Jenny Durkan (D), a former U.S. attorney, said local police will not assist federal agents in any marijuana crackdowns.

Denver, Colorado Mayor Michael Hancock (D) expressed “severe disappointment” about federal marijuana changes.

The Los Angeles, California City Council president said the city would move ahead with legal marijuana sales.

San Francisco, California’s marijuana permitting will proceed as well.

/ INTERNATIONAL

New Canadian data shows an increasing number of patients and doctors participating in the country’s medical cannabis program.

/ ADVOCACY

The Fraternal Order of Police applauded the Department of Justice’s move to rescind state marijuana law protections.

The National Sheriffs’ Association is also happy.

Prohibitionist group Smart Approaches to Marijuana could barely contain itself over the federal news.

Freedom Partners, an advocacy group funded by the Koch Brothers, slammed the federal cannabis change.

/ SCIENCE & HEALTH

A study found that “current blunt smokers had 1.4 times the odds of purchasing cannabis relative to the cannabis users who had never smoked a blunt” and  “current blunt smokers had greater odds of purchasing cannabis frequently and making the purchases in outdoor settings,” suggesting  that “current blunt smokers compared to other cannabis users are at greater risk of the dangers associated with illegal drug transactions.”

/ OPINION & ANALYSIS

Some Democratic analysts think that the party stands to benefit politically from the Trump administration’s anti-marijuana move.

/ BUSINESS

Marijuana stocks slid following news that U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions was rescinding guidance on state cannabis laws.

Monsanto tweeted to shoot down rumors it is working on GMO marijuana.

/ CULTURE     

Actor George Takei tweeted, “AG Sessions’s move to override the will of local voters and legislatures when it comes to marijuana laws is just the latest example of conservatives’ using federal power to impose red state values on the whole country. So much for that whole smaller government thing, I guess, eh?”

Actor Richard Schiff tweeted, “The war on drugs was a monumental mistake on so many levels. Militarizing gangs and police forces; mass incarceration; crowning kingpins of trafficking in Mexico, Columbia et al; endangering and handcuffing law enforcement and costing taxpayers over a trillion dollars.”

Late night TV hosts bashed Sessions’s marijuana move.

The post Trump administration ends Obama cannabis policy (Newsletter: Jan. 5, 2018) appeared first on Marijuana Moment.

Oklahoma: Initiative to Legalize Medical Cannabis Placed on June 26 Ballot

The Joint Blog - Fri, 01/05/2018 - 10:25
An initiative that would legalize medical cannabis throughout Oklahoma has been officially placed on the June 26 primary election ballot.

“I have set the date for voters to decide the medical marijuana issue to be the June 26 primary election”, Governor Mary Fallin announced today. Governor Fallin had the option of putting the measure – State Question 788 – to a vote of the people in June, or in November during the general election. The governor was given this choice following a successful signature gathering campaign which forced the state to put the medical cannabis legalization measure to a vote of the people.

The proposed law would allow patients to possess up to three ounces of cannabis (eight in a private residence) and up to 72 ounces of cannabis edibles. They would also be allowed to grow up to six mature cannabis plants, in addition to six seedlings. The measure states that “A regulatory office shall be established under the Oklahoma State Department of Health which will receive applications for medical license recipients, dispensaries, growers, and packagers within sixty (60) days of the passage of this initiative.” Cannabis would be taxed at 7%.

In 2016 Governor Fallin signed a far more limited cannabis-related measure into law, House Bill 2835 , allowing those with certain medical conditions who receive a recommendation from a physician to possess and use cannabis oil, given it has no more than 0.3% THC (tetrahydrocannabinol).

The post Oklahoma: Initiative to Legalize Medical Cannabis Placed on June 26 Ballot appeared first on TheJointBlog.

5 Differences Between THC and CBD

The Joint Blog - Fri, 01/05/2018 - 04:58

By Robert Bergman, ILoveGrowingMarijuana.com

What are the differences between THC and CBD? Here’s a look.

When you first start smoking weed, you hear the acronyms THC and CBD a lot. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the two main active cannabinoids in the cannabis plant. There are over one hundre other cannbinoids such as THC-V, THC-A,  and CBN, but if you’re first starting out you should primarily concern yourself with the first two, at least for now. Cannabinoids are these neat little compounds that interact with the endocannabinoids that naturally occur in your body. Though they are both cannabinoids, there are quite a few differences between THC and CBD. For instance…

CBD is Non Psychoactive

This is one of the biggest differences between THC and CBD. THC is the psychoactive cannabinoid; it’s the one that gets you baked. You know that heavy and relaxing feeling that you get after smoking some OG Kush? That can be attributed to THC. CBD on the other hand, is considered to be non psychoactive. This doesn’t mean that you feel nothing after using a high CBD strain or oil, quite the contrary. You won’t experience a noticeable change in your mood, but your body will feel uplifted and just all around. If you were feeling like you’re coming down with a cold prior to smoking, CBD will make you feel better almost instantly. Hence one of the reasons why CBD strains are more popular among medical cannabis users

CBD has Antipsychotic Properties

Sometimes when you smoke a high THC strain you might feel a little off. You might feel a little paranoid, you might have trouble concentrating, maybe your brain feels a little too slowed down, or maybe you feel dizzy. Regardless the effect, it seems that you got too high. The nice thing about CBD is that it can counteract some of those negative effects, and in some cases erase them entirely. High CBD strains are an excellent choice for first timers or those who haven’t figured out what their limits are.

CBD was Discovered First

A lot of people are inclined to believe that THC and CBD were discovered at the same time, or that THC was discovered first  This is another of the biggest differences between THC and CBD. CBD was discovered by American scientist  Roger Adams, a chemist at the University of Illinois, some 20 years before.  THC was actually discovered later by Israeli scientist and college professor Raphael Mechoulam back in the sixties. Mechoulam, better known as the father of cannabinoid research, is quite the extraordinary man.  You can read an interesting interview with Dr. Mechoulam here. Amazing as he is, he is often mistakenly credited with discovering both.

CBD Doesn’t Cause Anxiety

While some strains of high THC cannabis seem to cause endless anxiety in some, CBD does not cause any anxiety. Strains with low amounts of THC and high amounts of CBD are often used to treat anxiety, and I can tell you from experience that they are  extremely good at it. The next time you are feeling some anxiety, try reaching for a CBD strain like  ACDC rather than your usual THC strain. You will notice the difference and you’ll feel a lot better.

CBD Energizes You More

This is one of the differences between THC and CBD that a lot of people don’t know about. After consuming certain strains of THC, you’ve probably felt a little tired. This is because of the psychoactive effects of THC. This is why it is commonly used as a sleep aid. That’s great when you’re looking to go to sleep, but if you’re looking for a strain to pep you up and get you ready for the day, then you should try a CBD strain instead. You will notice that you feel more energized, with none of the fogginess that comes with using some other strains. Here’s another little secret: they’re great for hangovers. They say the best cure for a hangover is time, well add a little CBD to that and you are golden.

So as you can see, CBD has a lot of uses, and is in fact, quite helpful. CBD is what helps to heal the body, hence why it’s so popular among medical users. Try some today and it will change your life, I promise.

The post 5 Differences Between THC and CBD appeared first on TheJointBlog.

Syndicate content