Amendment 64

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Colorado: Police Bust Art Gallery That Gave Free Marijuana For Donations

(Photo of Adam Zimmerli and Devon Hawk Hazard: CBS4)By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Police have arrested the owners of a marijuana club operating out of a Denver art gallery. Two men reportedly offered free cannabis in exchange for donations to the gallery.

Colorado voters approved Amendment 64, legalizing marijuana for adults, back in November, but there's no legal system for buying and selling it, so places like the 530 Gallery on Santa Fe Boulevard have come with with ways to get around that, reports Rick Sallinger at CBS4.

Adam Zimmerli and Devon Hawk Hazard are now facing felony charges for distribution of marijuana.

Investigative reporter Sallinger visited the 530 Gallery, on Santa Fe Avenue in Denver's Art District, back in February. The gallery had been running a Craigslist ad which offered "high grade marijuana, free with a donation to the gallery." Sallinger said he was offered marijuana if he joined the club.

"As a member of the Cannabis Club of Denver, you follow Amendment 64," the man at the gallery told Sallinger.

Sallinger said he also found many other places also offering free pot in exchange for donations.

Colorado: Marijuana Legalization Task Force Issues Recommendations

Illustration: The Denver ChannelBy Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Colorado's marijuana task force issued 58 recommendations on Wednesday regarding how legal marijuana should be grown, sold and taxed in the Mile High State.

The government regulators, cannabis advocates and law enforcement officials on the Amendment 64 Task Force were appointed by Governor John Hickenlooper to recommend how to implement the constitutional amendment passed by voters in November which legalized marijuana use for adults 21 and older, reports Alan Gathright at The Denver Channel.

The task force's 165-page report now goes to the governor's desk and to the Legislature, which will consider its recommendations as laws are written to regulate legal marijuana.

The Legislature will have to then go back to voters for approval of sales and excise tax rates for cannabis, according to task force leaders.

While agreeing that there should be a special cannabis sales tax, the task force left it up to the Legislature to set the taxation rate.

A 25 percent sales tax was recommended by a task force working group, according to Task Force Co-Chair Jack Finlaw, the Gov. Hickenlooper's chief legal counsel. But some members worried that imposing such a high tax would make legal marijuana too expensive, feeding the black market.

Colorado: Cultivation of industrial hemp likely will be OK'd

By JOHN SCHROYER, Gazette

There is a truth that must be heard! Amendment 64’s legalization of marijuana drew the nation’s eyes to Colorado on Election Day. In the ensuing media frenzy, another portion of the ballot measure got lost — Colorado will likely legalize the cultivation of industrial hemp.

Tons of industrial hemp is imported into Colorado and other states annually from Canada, China and other countries, and hemp products are manufactured and sold throughout the country. But it remains illegal to grow hemp in the United States under federal law.

Hemp proponents say cultivating the plant would create an industry and could be a boon to the economies of Colorado and the nation.

Hemp has long been a stigmatized plant since it’s linked to marijuana because of its ingredient tetrahydrocannabinol, aka THC, the psychoactive substance in pot.

Industrial hemp contains three-tenths of 1 percent of THC, while marijuana typically contains 10 percent or higher.

Amendment 64 will separate hemp from the definition of “marijuana” in the Colorado state Constitution, and it will require the Legislature to set up regulations for hemp farmers and sellers by July 1, 2014.

The amendment also makes it legal to possess up to an ounce of marijuana and to grow up to six marijuana plants, and allows for marijuana stores to begin setting up shop in January 2014.

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