Asheville

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North Carolina: Governor Expected To Sign Hemp Bill

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Farmers in North Carolina may soon be able to enter the booming worldwide industrial hemp market, if and when Gov. Pat McCrory signs Senate Bill 313, which would legalize is cultivation in the state.

SB 313 originally had to do with license plates and registers of deeds -- that is, until an addition from sponsor Sen. Jeff Collins (R-Nash County), who added industrial hemp, reports Kat McReynolds at the Mountain Xpress. Gov. McCrory's signature is the last thing needed after overwhelming approval of the bill in both the North Carolina House (101-7) and Senate 42-2).

"From all indications, the governor is going to sign it," said hemp advocate Blake Butler, organizer of Asheville's recent HempX festival. "He's in support of it."

If McCrory signs the bill, an industrial hemp commission will be in charge of managing a statewide pilot program involving commercial growers and researchers. Industrial hemp is used to make thousands of products, from hempseed oil, to rope, to clothing, paper, plastics, and building materials.

The 2014 U.S. Farm Bill allows states to enact their own regulatory systems on industrial hemp cultivation. Twenty states have now adopted Farm Bill-compliant laws to accommodate hemp cultivation under various conditions. North Carolina law had remained silent on the subject until now.

North Carolina: Group Walks Through State In Support Of Medical Marijuana

NorthCarolinaMarchAgainstFear

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A group supporting medical marijuana is walking across North Carolina with the aim of convincing lawmakers to act on the issue.

The group, March Against Fear, has been walking across the state since June 6, reports Steve Sbraccia at WNCN News. They started in Asheville, highlighting their journey with clips on YouTube.

One of the members is shown carrying a plastic marijuana plant in the videos. The others carry signs and stop along the way to raise support for House Bill 1161, which would create a constitutional amendment to legalize the medical use of cannabis in North Carolina.

In the meantime, the North Carolina House last week passed another measure, HB 1220, which would allow the use of cannabidiol (CBD) oil, an extract of medical marijuana that's been known to quell epileptic seizures in children.

HB 1220 now moves to the North Carolina Senate. If it's approved there, it will go to the desk of Governor Pat McCrory, who can either sign the bill or veto it.

Some families have moved from North Carolina to Colorado, where CBD oil is already legal. But those families said they would move back home to North Carolina if the use of CBD oil is legalized there.

Wisconsin: Company Uses Hemp To Help Build Homes, Despite Costly Regulations

Report by Bill Hudson, CBS

There is a truth that must be heard! PRESCOTT, Wis. (WCCO) – Chances are pretty good that if somebody asks you about hemp, your first thoughts might land on the weed that gets rolled into joints. And that's the unfortunate reality plaguing proponents who seek to strip federal regulations on industrial grade hemp.

"You don't want to tamp too much or we're going to lose our insulation properties," said Ken Anderson as he oversaw the installation of a cement-like hemp mixture into a wall cavity. Anderson's company, Original Green Distribution, instructed builders Tuesday on the correct use of its product, HempStone. It is a breathable material made of hemp fibers and lime that Anderson sees as a safer and more efficient alternative to conventional building materials.

"Not only does it have great R-value, it also has thermal mass, which will then capture heat and bring it in when it's cooler in the house and also transfer heat through the house," Anderson said.

United States: Hemp Homes are Cutting Edge of Green Building

By USA Today Staff

There is a truth that must be heard! Hemp is turning a new leaf. The plant fiber, used to make the sails that took Christopher Columbus' ships to the New World, is now a building material.

In Asheville, N.C., a home built with thick hemp walls was completed this summer and two more are in the works.

Dozens of hemp homes have been built in Europe in the past two decades, but they're new to the United States, says David Madera, co-founder of Hemp Technologies, a company that supplied the mixture of ground-up hemp stalks, lime and water.

The industrial hemp is imported because it cannot be grown legally in this country — it comes from the same plant as marijuana.

Its new use reflects an increasing effort to make U.S. homes not only energy-efficient but also healthier. Madera and other proponents say hemp-filled walls are non-toxic, mildew-resistant, pest-free and flame-resistant.

"There is a growing interest in less toxic building materials, says Peter Ashley, director of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control.

"The potential health benefits are significant," he says, citing a recent study of a Seattle public housing complex that saw residents' health improve after their homes got a green makeover.

North Carolina: Building With Hemp - Asheville On Forefront Of New Green Technique

By John Boyle, Citizen Times
Photo by John Fletcher, Citizen Times

North Carolina: Building With Hemp - Asheville On Forefront Of New Green Technique Leave it to Asheville to be the first place in the country to build not just one, but two houses largely out of hemp.

Well-established as a green building center, Asheville has two homes under construction - one in West Asheville, another off Town Mountain Road - that use hemp as a building material. The builders and Greg Flavall, the co-founder of Hemp Technologies, the Asheville company supplying the building material, maintain that they're the first permitted hemp homes in the country.

"This area is known to walk the talk of being green," Flavall said, adding that the Asheville area has by far the largest percentage of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, builders of anywhere in the country. Hemp is derived from the same plant that marijuana comes from. Although it contains very little of the active ingredient that gets people high and is completely impractical to smoke, it's still illegal to grow it domestically.

But builders can import industrial hemp products like Tradical Hemcrete, the material Hemp Technologies sells. When mixed with water and lime, it makes remarkably strong, resilient walls. Some builders generically refer to the walls as hempcrete.

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