cannabidiol

Oklahoma: Governor Signs Bill Changing 'Marijuana' Definition To Exclude Fed-approved CBD

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin has signed a bill removing any federally approved CBD product or drug from the state’s definition of “marijuana.” The move does little in helping to provide access to CBD therapies since no CBD-based drug or product has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

State Rep. Jon Echols said the measure “is the next logical step to expanding the state’s highly successful CBD program” and has helped “hundreds if not thousands” of Oklahoma citizens.

“In the history of the program there have been no reported incidents of abuse,” the Republican said in the report. “This non-intoxicating substance has literally changed the lives of many Oklahomans.”

“This makes it clear that if the FDA does approve a cannabidiol drug for use for medical treatment, that it would be legal,” Echols said.

West Virginia: Amendment To Bill Would Legalize Hemp-Derived CBD In The State

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Lawmakers in West Virginia have explained language in a bill that would add substances to the drug schedule that would allow the sale, distribution, and prescription of hemp-derived CBD oils, according to a Herald-Dispatch report. The amendment differentiates between CBD products derived from hemp and CBD derived from marijuana plants containing more than the .3 percent THC allowable under federal law.

The changes were made by the Senate Judiciary Committee after the Director of the West Virginia Hemp Industries Association Morgan Leach said the original version would cause confusion regarding CBD.

Leach said that making the “cash crop” available will help the state become “a catalyst for entrepreneurship and innovation.”

“This revision protects West Virginia hemp farmers’ ability to cultivate and process hemp for CBD. This is one of our biggest revenue streams that will help make our farmers more money as they begin to develop this crop in West Virginia,” Leach said in the report. “Our goals are to (build) industries around food products, dietary supplements, cosmetics and topicals, paper, textiles, bio-plastics, advanced battery technologies and much more.”

The measure has been sent to the Senate with a recommendation to pass it.

U.S.: GW Pharma Moves To Monopolize CBD Market

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Bruce Barcott of Leafly has exposed some actions taken by GW Pharma (NASDAQ: GWPH) that seem to attempt to limit competition from suppliers of CBD.

Lobbyists have been engaged in several states by the company and its U.S. subsidiary, Greenwich BioSciences, companies which are both supporting legislation in South Dakota and Nebraska that would “effectively give GW/Greenwich a temporary monopoly on legal CBD products” in those states for its Epidiolex.

If given FDA approval, Epidiolex could be on the market in early 2018. Legislation advancing in both South Dakota and Nebraska suggests that CBD would be permitted only from FDA-approved providers.

Barcott says GW Pharma and Greenwich BioSciences have hired lobbyists in Arizona, Florida, Idaho, Minnesota, Nebraska, South Dakota, Washington and Wisconsin and possibly in California. Barcott attempted to contact GW Pharma for comment but has not yet received a reply. Should GW Pharma succeed in stifling competition, it could have a serious impact on hopeful in-state poducers of CBD, as well as companies both foreign and domestic who extract CBD from industrial hemp.

U.S.: Hemp Industry Association Says DEA Ruling Does Not Make CBD Illegal

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The Hemp Industry Association has made an announcement that a recent ruling by the U.S. DEA (Drug Enforcement Administration) did not make cannabidoids (CBD) illegal.

The following statement was issued by the Hemp Industry Association:

Yesterday the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) issued a Final Rule on the coding of marijuana extracts. Unfortunately some misleading media stories and social media postings lead quite a few people to panic at reports that CBD was being banned under this new rule.

The Sky is NOT Falling. The Final Rule published by DEA did not change the legal status of CBD. This can only be done by a scheduling action which has NOT occurred.

HIA has carefully reviewed this with our legal advisors and discussed it with industry experts. While there are some differing opinions on the effect of the rule, there is general agreement that yesterday's ruling did not change the status of CBD. Here are some important facts to know:

Cannabidiol is not listed on the federal schedule of controlled substances
Sec. 7606 of the Farm Bill defines hemp as distinct from marijuana and does not treat it as a controlled substance when grown under a compliant state program.

Despite these facts, DEA has stated that CBD is a controlled substance previously.

U.S.: New DEA Rule Bans CBD

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Update 12/16/2016: Although widely reported by many news sources that the DEA has banned cannabidiol (CBD), the Hemp Industry Association has made it clear that the DEA has, in fact, not banned CBD.

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) just banned cannabidiol (CBD), placing it on its list of Schedule 1 drugs. CBD is a chemical found in marijuana that won't make you high, but will stop seizures and help people with debilitating conditions.

Schedule 1 drugs are considered to have no medical benefit and to be highly addictive. The DEA banned the herbal pain reliever Kratom earlier this year, another alternative to dangerous prescription opioids.

DEA Acting Administrator Chuck Rosenberg said this code “will allow DEA and DEA-registered entities to track quantities of this material separately from quantities of marihuana.”

The rule reads, “For practical purposes, all extracts that contain CBD will also contain at least small amounts of other cannabinoids. However, if it were possible to produce from the cannabis plant an extract that contained only CBD and no other cannabinoids, such an extract would fall within the new drug code.”

Kentucky: Agriculture Commissioner Objects To USDA Rules On Industrial Hemp

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Kentucky's Agriculture Commissioner is asking the United States Department of Agriculture to reconsider its latest set of rules regarding industrial hemp.

A provision in the 2014 Farm Bill allowed states to grow hemp for research purposes, but did not remove the marijuana-related plant from the controlled substances list, giving federal agencies authority over restrictions.

Ryan Quarles said last month that he would be reviewing the USDA's 'Statement of Principles' to see how it relates to Kentucky's own pilot hemp research program.

Quarles sent a letter yesterday to the USDA, saying he now has several objections in that several aspects of the principles contradict Congress' original intent and "could hinder industrial hemp's economic potential" in Kentucky.

Quarles says the new rules name the only economically viable parts of the hemp plant as the "fiber and seed" to only be used for industrial applications. Quarles says that over half of Kentucky's hemp acreage harvests cannabidiol - a hemp oil that comes from neither the fiber or seed, and that the 'industrial application' provision would also mean hemp could not be used in a drug, as a food ingredient or for artistic purposes.

He also takes issue with the USDA’s declaration that hemp seeds and plants may not be transported across state lines.

U.S.: Derrick Morgan Becomes 2nd Active NFL Player To Support Marijuana Research

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Last week Derrick Morgan, starting outside linebacker for the Tennessee Titans, became the second active NFL player to call on the league to support cannabis research in order to see how specific compounds in the plant can help treat or prevent chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE.)

"If there's any evidence that this could help players, they owe it to us to explore it," Morgan told USA Today. "You hear about a lot of former players suffering from depression and dementia.

"Or the suicides," Morgan said. "[The NFL] could and should be a leader in this. If there's any evidence that this could help players, they owe it to us to explore it ... It's a legitimate ask."

Morgan went on to tell Katie Couric in an exclusive interview: "Given how much influence the NFL has on society, I think it would help the greater good. There's a lot of people suffering and a lot of people that can benefit from cannabis as a medical treatment."

Global: Facebook Waging Weird War On Hemp

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Facebook’s weird and inexplicable history of attacking CBD (hemp oil) pages is well documented. It doesn’t make any sense, but we all know it happens: Facebook routinely shuts down pages for any number of often-unspecified reasons, and evidently CBD falls afoul of one of its labyrinthine, incomprehensible and arrogant policies.

So it was perhaps no surprise that one of the most popular UK CBD pages, Canabidol who produce the CBD Gel-Tab, the UK’s best selling CBD supplement, was last week shut down by Facebook admins.

Facebook is a vital tool for pretty much any business today. If you want to sell anything -- especially if you’re selling a niche product -- a social media presence is vital.

Many businesses, like Canabidol, spend thousands on Facebook advertising. It’s an investment into building an audience of potential customers, so when businesses lost their Facebook pages their profitability takes a hit, especially if they have client information, order details and other vital data stored in the page’s inbox.

U.S.: 7th Annual Hemp History Week Features Events June 6-12

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The 7th annual Hemp History Week will be observed June 6-12, 2016, marked by several special events during the campaign. Hemp History Week is the national effort of grassroots organizers, leading hemp product manufacturers, farmers and advocates from all walks of life, working to change federal policy on industrial hemp in the United States.

This year promises to be an historic time in the movement to legalize hemp farming, as more farmers than ever before are planting hemp in states that have lifted prohibition on the crop. The 7th annual campaign will include grassroots events across the country, nationwide retail events and promotions, hemp plantings (in some states where hemp farming is legal under Section 7606 of the U.S. Farm Bill), documentary screenings, farmer outreach, and more.

In addition to its sponsorship of the national program, CV Sciences, via their PlusCBD Oil™ brand, will also be hosting and participating in a number of events focused in California and Kentucky.

South Dakota: Medical Marijuana Measure Won't Be On Ballot

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

A bill aimed at legalizing small amounts of marijuana for medical use in South Dakota will not appear on the November ballot, Secretary of State Shantel Krebs said Friday.

In a statement, Krebs said a challenge to the number of valid petition signatures submitted with the measure was unsuccessful and it didn't have enough to meet the 13,871 signatures needed to appear on the ballot.

It's not the first failed attempt to legalize medical marijuana in the state.

The measure's sponsors came up short last year in the number of signatures required to get a measure on the ballot.

Another marijuana measure was unexpectedly supported by senators and Gov. Dennis Daugaard, but failed in the Legislature. That bill would have legalized the use of cannabidiol, a marijuana derivative that doesn't give the user a high, for individuals who suffer from disorders with seizures.

Oklahoma: House Approves Bill To Expand Use Of Oil Made From Marijuana

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The Oklahoma House has approved legislation that expands the medical use of an oil derived from marijuana.

The House approved the measure with a vote of 69-14 and has sent it to Gov. Mary Fallin to be signed into law.

The measure will allow the medically supervised use of cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating derivative of marijuana. Backers say the oil is effective in treating people who have epileptic seizures. Use of the oil had been restricted to children under 18, but the bill approves Thursday removes the age restriction.

The measure also allows use of the oil to treat spasticity due to multiple sclerosis, paraplegia, and symptoms of chronic wasting disease.

Fallin signed legislation last year authorizing the use of cannabidiol in children but said she remains opposed to legalizing all medical marijuana.

Alabama: Senate Passes Medical Marijuana Oil Bill

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

A bill that will decriminalize medicinal marijuana oil has passed a vote in the Alabama legislature.

On Wednesday, senators voted 29-3 for the bill, which would legalize possession of cannabidiol.

Bill sponsor Rep. Paul Sanford says he hopes CBD oil access will provide a little “sunlight” to families struggling with debilitating medical conditions.

Republican Sen. Phil Williams was one of the three voting against the bill, saying current evidence on the effects of CBD oils is too “experimental” and “anecdotal.”

The bill is nicknamed “Leni’s Law” after a young girl with a severe epileptic condition. Leni Young’s family left the state for Oregon, where they can legally access CBD oil.

A previous version of the bill passed the House earlier this month. Sanford’s substitute version will now return to the House for a vote.

Georgia: Battle Over 'No Buzz' Medical Marijuana Law Turns To Civil Disobedience

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A civil disobedience campaign is now underway in Georgia to try to force legislators to expand the state's weak CBD only medical marijuana law, which left a lot of suffering children without legal access to the medicine they need.

A Georgia mpom is helping lead that fight to expand the state's extremely limited medical marijuana law, which she said unfairly excludes many patients with severe medical conditions, including her five-year-old autistic daughter, who could benefit from the medicinal properties of cannabis.

"There are some pretty tenacious parents who are fighting," said Jennifer Conforti, whose daughter, Abby, isn't covered by the current "CBD-only" law, written by lawmakers who understand neither the medicinal properties of cannabinoids, nor, according to Sue Rusche, president and CEO of the Atlanta-based drug prevention organization National Families in Action,m the process of drug approval.

Texas: Marijuana Show To Hold Auditions At Southwest Cannabis Conference

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The Marijuana Show, a reality cable TV show called the “Shark Tank for Ganjapreneurs” by CNBC, will be making a free presentation combined with auditions at the first-ever Texas marijuana conference, The Southwest Cannabis Conference & Expo in Fort Worth, Texas.

At the Southwest Cannabis Conference & Expo, cannabis entrepreneurs will be able to participate in the “Pitchfest” and make a three minute presentation to Karen Paull and Wendy Robbins, The Marijuana Show’s producers. Pitchfest winners may star in season three of the show in which over $15 million has been offered to previous contestants. All Expo attendees are invited to participate and watch the Pitchfest at no charge.

The “Pitchfest“ auditions for the The Marijuana Show will be held at the Ft. Worth Convention Center, Saturday, February 27, from noon to 1:00 pm (CST). To register and find out more details about the Pitchfest, visit this site.

People interested in the Pitchfest should be able to present business plans and proof of applicable licenses and permits. They must be over age 21 and present a valid ID.

At this same Pitchfest, the producers will also make a presentation, “7 Secrets to a Successful Pitch," to all interested Expo attendees on February 27.

In addition, a free webinar on “7 Secrets of a Successful Pitch” will be held on February 23 at 6pm Mountain Time. To register, go to www.greenequitymedia.com.

Oregon: Scant Hemp Harvest For Medicine Despite Wide Interest

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Michael Hughes could legally grow marijuana in his back yard in Bend, Oregon, if he wanted to. But he can't grow hemp there.

Hughes bought a license to grow hemp, but due to a number of factors, it's still more legally difficult to grow hemp than marijuana and other crops in Oregon, reports Taylor W. Anderson at The Bend Bulletin.

The Legislature authorized hemp cultivation in 2009, despite it being considered marijuana and thus a Schedule I controlled substance federally. The law put the Oregon Department of Agriculture in charge of writing rules and licensing growers.

After taking five years(!) to finish the rules, the agency was finally ready this year for what turned out to be a largely unsuccessful growing season in which just nine licensed hemp farmers got crops into the ground. Those who braved the regulatory environment had to deal with months of uncertainty in a state that last November voted to legalize recreational marijuana for adults 21 and older.

Timidity by the Department of Agriculture to embrace hemp has combined with federal law to cripple Oregon's hemp market, despite commercial interest in creating an industry that could lead the nation, according to farmers, businesses, lawmakers and the agencies overseeing hemp in Oregon and other states.

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