domestic violence

U.S.: Study Finds Less Domestic Violence Among Married Couples Who Smoke Marijuana

CoupleSmokingMarijuana

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

New findings from a study of 634 couples have found that the more often they smoked marijuana, they less likely they were to engage in domestic violence. The study's big sample size and the nine-year length of the study make it a significant finding.

Researchers hypothesized that the positive effects of using cannabis may actually help reduce conflict and aggression. The findings were strong even after controlling for things like demographics, behavioral problems, and alcohol use, reports Christopher Ingraham at The Washington Post.

The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University at Buffalo School of Public Health and Health Professions along with the Research Institute on Addictions (RIA), appeared in the August online edition of Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, reports Cathy Wilde at the ]University at Buffalo.

Looking at couples over the first nine years of marriage, the study, "Couples' Marijuana Use Is Inversely Related to Their Intimate Partner Violence Over the First 9 Years of Marriage," found:

• More frequent cannabis use by husbands and wives (two to three times or more per month) predicted less frequent intimate partner violence (IPV) by husbands.

• Husbands' marijuana use also predicted less frequent IPV perpetration by wives.

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