eric steenstra

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/hemporg/public_html/news/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 34.

U.S.: Industrial Hemp Advocates Want The DEA To Stop Being Stupid

hemp field 2.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The Hemp Industries Association is petitioning the Drug Enforcement Administration to de-schedule hemp, the non-psychoactive plant related to marijuana, and allow states the right to grow it and take advantage of its massive economic and industrial potential.

The advocates are basing their push for hemp legalization on a change in the 2014 Farm Bill which made a distinction between hemp and its psychoactive cousin marijuana based on a threshold of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the substance which produces a high from cannabis.

Industrial hemp, according to the legislative change, contains less than 0.3 percent THC. Levels that low would make it impossible for the plant to cause a high if smoked or eaten.

Via the Hemp Industries Association:

U.S.: Entrepreneurs Increasingly Using Hemp For Home Construction

HempField[GreenBuilt.com]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Wall Street analyst James Savage thought there must be a better way. Growing disturbed about the conditions he saw on TV after events like Hurricane Katrina and the earthquake in Haiti, he started looking for a better building material -- and the material he found, through a simple Internet search, was industrial hemp.

"There has to be something better we can do than this," he recalled thinking, reports Matt A.V. Chaban at The New York Times. "Who knew hemp would be the answer to what we were looking for?"

Savage started a company, Green Built, to create building materials derived from cannabis. His first project has been his own 1850s farmhouse, but he said he believes hemp-based building materials can transform both agriculture and construction.

Hemp has had a long history as a fiber used in ropes, sails, and paper products, with Presidents Washington and Jefferson famously cultivating it. Savage is among a small but growing number of entrepreneurs who have turned to hempcrete, which is made using the woody interior of the cannabis stalk combined with lime and water.

Hempcrete provides natural insulation, and is flexible, non-toxic, impervious to mold and pests, and practically fireproof.

U.S.: Best Practices Advocated For Labeling, Manufacturing Cannabis and Hemp Products

MedicalCannabisUnityConference2015.JPG

Groups convene in Washington, DC for third annual national medical cannabis conference March 27-31

The American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) Cannabis Committee, in coordination with Americans for Safe Access (ASA), and the Hemp Industries Association (HIA), has announced the release of a joint statement advocating for implementation of best practices for the regulation of consumable, topical, and inhalant cannabis and hemp-derived products to ensure quality and consumer safety.

These best practices were developed with the input of numerous industry experts and establish common language and defined terms for the transparent and accurate labeling of these products to support responsible commerce and informed use of the cannabis plant.

AHPA, ASA and HIA will be promoting these best practices at the 3rd Annual National Medical Cannabis Unity Conference being held March 27-31, in Washington, DC.

Recommendations for plant part identification

The AHPA Cannabis Committee has established a policy that lawfully-marketed products consisting of or including Cannabis spp. ingredients that are intended for oral ingestion, topical application, or inhalation be labeled to identify the part of the Cannabis plant from which the ingredient is derived (e.g., seed oil, flower extract, or extract of aerial parts). This policy does not apply to parts of the Cannabis plant provided to consumers in unprocessed and recognizable forms.

D.C.: Hemp Industries Association To Present 21st Annual Conference Sept. 21-22

HempIndustriesAssociationConference2014

The 21st annual conference of the Hemp Industries Association (HIA) will be held Sunday, September 21 and Monday, September 22 at the Phoenix Park Hotel in Washington, DC.

Business leaders and farmers in the hemp industry in North America and from abroad will meet during the two-day event to discuss strategies and plans to legalize industrial hemp and return hemp to the American agrarian landscape once again.

The conference will include expert speakers, hemp exhibits and sales, luncheon, silent auction, networking dinner, presentations, panel discussion and updates on industry developments and expanding markets for hemp products.

Speakers from the hemp industry and movement will present at the conference including Doug Fine, author of Hemp Bound, John Roulac, President of Nutiva, Steve Allin, featured speaker and author of Building with Hemp, Christina Volgyesi, Marketing Director of Dr. Bronner's Magic Soaps, and other leaders in the hemp industry.

The 21st conference occurs at a significant moment in hemp history, as the first legal hemp harvests in the U.S. in decades will be taking place in Colorado, Kentucky and Vermont this fall. Exceeding $581 million in 2013 annual sales according to SPINS market data and HIA estimates, hemp is among the fastest growing categories for food and consumer products in the U.S.

In addition to presentations on hemp manufacturing, agronomy, and other industry issues, a special panel discussion focusing on new cannabidiol (CBD) research and its market potential will take place on Sunday.

U.S.: Hemp Industries Association Warns About Misbranding CBD Products as Hemp Oil

HempIndustriesAssociation(HIA)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The North American trade group Hemp Industries Association has published its position on what it called the misbranding of cannabidiol (CBD) products as "hemp oil." The new statement from HIA explains the difference between hemp oil and CBD extracts in terms of their respective uses and means of production, and emphasizes the need for accurate language in the marketplace so consumers aren't misled.

"Hemp oil is the common term for hempseed oil, obtained by pressing hemp seeds that contain low levels of CBD, typically less than 25 parts per million (ppm)," the position states. "In contrast, CBD extracts are produced either directly from cannabis flowers that are up to 15 percent CBD (150,000 ppm), or indirectly as a co-product of the flowers and leaves that are mixed in with the stalks during hemp stalk processing for fiber."

The Drug Enforcement Administration attempted to ban important and commerce of hempseed and oil food products in 2001, claiming these products were Schedule I controlled substances. However, HIA successfully sued the CDEA, unequivocally establishing hemp seed, oil, and protein as entirely legal to import, process, sell and consume in the United States.

California: Governor Brown Signs Bill Legalizing Hemp Farming Under State Law

HempHarvest

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

California Governor Jerry Brown has signed SB 566, the California Industrial Hemp Farming Act, legalizing hemp farming under state law.

Introduced by state Senator Mark Leno earlier this year, SB 566 ensures that California is prepared to begin registering hemp farmers once the federal government gives states the green light, according to hemp advocacy organization Vote Hemp and the Hemp Industries Association (HIA), an industry trade group.

The California Industrial Hemp Farming Act will establish a framework for farming the oilseed and fiber varieties of the plant, which are used in a myriad of everyday consumer products, including food, body care, clothing, paper, auto parts, composites, building materials, and biofuels.

Enforcement and oversight of hemp production would be handled in cooperation with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) and country agricultural commissioners, as is done with other farm crops.

U.S.: House Passes Amendment Protecting State Rights To Grow Hemp For Research

HempFieldFatherAndDaughter

Bipartisan Coalition Works to Give Colleges and Universities Ability to Conduct Critical Research

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

An amendment allowing colleges and universities to grow and cultivate industrial hemp in states where it is already legal, without fear of federal interference, passed the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday by a vote of 225 to 200.

Reps. Jared Polis (D-CO), Thomas Massie (R-KY) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) introduced the amendment to H.R. 1947, the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013, the FARRM Bill.

“Industrial hemp is an important agricultural commodity, not a drug,” said Rep. Polis. “My bipartisan, common-sense amendment, which I’ve introduced with Representatives Thomas Massie (R-KY) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), would allow colleges and universities to grow and cultivate industrial hemp for academic and agricultural research purposes in states where industrial hemp growth and cultivation is already legal.

"Many states, including Colorado, have demonstrated that they are fully capable of regulating industrial hemp," Rep. Polis said. "George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp. The first American flag was made of hemp. And today, U.S. retailers sell over $300 million worth of goods containing hemp—but all of that hemp is imported, since farmers can’t grow it here.

Syndicate content