house bill 1317

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Colorado: Governor Signs Legislation Establishing Legal Marijuana Market For Adults

WelcomeToColoradoMarijuana

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper on Tuesday signed historic measures to implement marijuana legalization, establishing the Mile High State as the first legal, regulated and taxed marijuana market for adults since the United Nations Single Convention Treaty on Narcotic Drugs took effect in 1961.

Hickenlooper vocally opposed cannabis legalization last fall when Amendment 64 was on the ballot, saying "Colorado is known for many great things; marijuana should not be one of them." But he signed the bills that will start development of a regulatory framework for the legal marijuana industry, as well as for the cultivation, distribution and processing of industrial hemp, reports Matt Ferner at The Huffington Post.

"Recreational marijuana really is new territory," Hickenlooper said at Tuesday's signing ceremony. He called the bills "common sense," despite his vocal opposition in the past to legalization, reports Kristin Wyatt of The Associated Press.

The governor's chief legal counsel, Jack Finlaw, said although the Hickenlooper administration was opposed to marijuana legalization, "the will of the voters needed to be implemented."

Colorado: Attorney Threatens 1st Amendment Lawsuit Over Marijuana Magazine Rule

(Graphic: The Huffington Post)By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A Denver attorney is threatening a lawsuit if Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper signs House Bill 1317, the marijuana regulation bill that includes a requirement for marijuana magazines to be kept behind store counters.

HB 1317, recently passed by the Legislature, also contains other regulations on the sale of marijuana and the licensing of cannabis businesses, report Lindsey Sablan and Phil Tenser of The Denver Channel. Gov. Hickenlooper has said he intends to sign the plan into law.

David Lane, a veteran criminal and defense attorney based in Denver, threatened a lawsuit over the marijuana magazine rule. He is representing two cannabis publications, the Daily Doobie and the Hemp Connoisseur.

"My own personal belief is that this is a blatant First Amendment violation," Lane wrote in a letter to Colorado Attorney General John Suthers. "It has apparently passed muster with the House and Senate and the governor will be signing it shortly. Please inform Governor Hickenlooper that if this is signed into law, he can expect a First Amendment law suit filed promptly."

Colorado: Legislature Unveils Long-Awaited Marijuana Regulations

(Graphic: The Coloradoan)By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Colorado lawmakers late on Thursday unveiled a long-awaited bill containing proposed regulations for the state's newly legal recreational marijuana industry, moving the Rocky Mountain High state closer to a legal cannabis marketplace.

The bill runs 57 pages and includes most of the ideas endorsed by a legislative committee for how marijuana businesses should operate and be structured, reports John Ingold at The Denver Post. A second bill, also introduced on Thursday, details a proposed marijuana tax structure which voters would have to approve.

Both bills must pass both the House and Senate, requiring a minimum of six different votes, by May 8, the end of the legislative session. If that doesn't happen, it's likely that lawmakers would call a special session this spring, since this is the only chance they have to regulate marijuana before legal cannabis stores open around the beginning of next year.

House Bill 1317, the main marijuana regulation bill, is sponsored by Rep. Dan Pabon (D-Denver), and details how marijuana stores are to operate and be governed. It requires that marijuana growers and sellers operate separately, opposite of the requirements for medical marijuana dispensaries.

Only Colorado residents will be allowed to own or work in recreational marijuana stores. The stores will be allowed to sell only a quarter-ounce of cannabis to people from out of state.

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