humboldt county

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California: Humboldt County Sheriff's Vehicles Show Unusual Activity Tuesday

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At about 10 a.m. on Tuesday, June 7, “at least eight” Humboldt County Sheriff’s vehicles gathered at the River Lodge Conference Center in west Fortuna, according to reports from witnesses.

On Monday, June 6, a similar group of Humboldt County Sheriff vehicles had congregated in the Carlotta area, reports Kym Kemp on her website Redheaded Blackbelt. "Several reports noted they had a chipper," Kemp reported. "One reader insisted she saw several different convoys."

The information posted on Tuesday by the Sheriff’s Office indicates that three were arrested on Monday by Humboldt County’s Drug Task Force for growing/cultivating marijuana. These were likely related to the law enforcement convoy/s out Highway 36, according to Kemp.

"In what may be a totally unrelated development, Southern Humboldt is buzzing about what appeared to be a series of low flying helicopter recognizance flights–reports have come in from Shelter Cove, Blue Slide, and Salmon Creek," Redheaded Blackbelt reports.

"We have requested more information from the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office and will update when possible," Kemp posted.

California: Future of Humboldt County's Marijuana Industry Discussed

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Ganjapreneur, an online cannabis business resource, interviews Dr. Dominic Corva in the latest episode of its series of podcast interviews featuring successful cannabis entrepreneurs and industry experts.

Dr. Corva is a political geographer and public policy scholar who has written extensively on both international drug policy in the Western Hemisphere as well as the political economy of cannabis agriculture in southern Humboldt County. In the past he has worked as a professor at Sarah Lawrence College and Humboldt State University, though these days he is executive director at the Cannabis and Social Policy Center (CASP).

The interview is hosted by Shango Los of the Vashon Island Marijuana Entrepreneurs Alliance. Over the course of the interview, the two discuss the past and future of international drug policy, the flawed implementation of Washington's I-502 market, the impact of data-tracking on legal marijuana, and the future of Humboldt County cannabis growers.

“The biggest misconception is that legalization means that everyone is more free to engage in cannabis commerce, when in fact, legalization clearly means that new lines are being drawn,” Dr. Corva explained.

Though his work has been dedicated to aiding and understanding business interests in the cannabis industry, Dr. Corva is openly thankful for the activism efforts that brought us here: "As long as we’re not moving backwards on the criminal justice side of it, then we’re still, I think, moving a little bit in the right direction."

California: They're Coming After MMJ, and 'Law and Order' Is The Phrase of the Day

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

What's so scary about a free market? Almost two decades after California voters approved the medicinal use of marijuana, the state's cannabis trade is being described as a "Wild West," even as it has reached the status of a $2 billion industry.

Legislators, of course, are doing what lawmakers do. They want to bring "law and order" to the business, reports Anita Chabria at The Guardian.

There are currently three bills in the Legislature which would codify how medicinal cannabis is grown and sold in the Golden State, including whether the state or local municipalities have control, and what environmental and health issues should be addressed.

"There are no rules or regulations in California," claimed state Senator Mike McGuire. "For two decades now, the Golden State has allowed the cannabis industry to grow unchecked."

McGuire is sponsoring the Medical Marijuana Public Safety and Environmental Protection Act (SB 643), which focuses on the impact of growing on the environment. He said illegal grows are deforesting government lands, polluting waterways and "affecting the health of those who use medical marijuana," whatever that means, since most medical marijuana is grown legally in the state, not in national forests.

California: First Cannabis Film Festival In USA Premieres May 1 In Humboldt

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According to organizers, it's the first-ever annual Cannabis Film Festival in the United States -- and they could hardly have picked a more appropriate location in Garberville, the heart of the Emerald Triangle.

"The action starts on Friday, May 1, with a full weekend of activities until we yell, 'Cut' on Sunday, said organizer Jack Rikess. "Be part of history as we usher in a new era with bright lights, a smoking red carpet and other assorted treats and surprises. The event is open to the public."

Tickets are on sale now, according to Rikess.

Jack told Hemp News that the Cannabis Film Festival provides a means for filmmakers to share their work with both distributors and the general public. "The CFF is designed to enable 'cream of the crop' film projects to gain exposure to larger and more mainstream audiences," Rikess said.

"The festival is also an amazing opportunity for a broad range of organizations to help further the cause of enlightening the general public about cannabis," Rikess said. "The Cannabis Film Festival is a full weekend event that provides a venue for cannabis-related businesses and local artisans to expose their goods and services to festival attendees in between the viewing of film submissions.

"Our mission is to increase public awareness of all aspects of the cannabis industry through educational and entertaining film media with the intention of raising consciousness regarding the many uses and applications of cannabis," Rikess said.

California: Tailgating of Deputy Leads To Bust of Marijuana Grow

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Never ride the cops' bumper, man. A man getting stopped for allegedly tailgating a Humboldt County sheriff's deputy led to the discovery of an illegal marijuana grow site allegedly run by the driver.

The deputy was driving a marked patrol truck southbound on U.S. Highway 101 near Eureka when a pickup truck came up behind him in the fast lane, reports the Eureka Times-Standard. The truck remained behind him, and the deputy felt he was being followed a little too closely.

The deputy pulled into the slow lane, and the truck passed him at an estimated 80 miles per hour in a 65-mph zone. The deputy caught back up with the truck and pulled it over.

The driver, Kevin Bourque, 34, of Eureka, was asked to step out of the truck, along with his two passengers. A search of the vehicle turned up a bag containing about a pound of cannabis, paperwork indicating marijuana sales, and about $14,500 in cash, according to the deputy.

A search warrant was obtained for a Eureka address found on papers in the car. At that residence, deputies found and confiscated 497 growing marijuana plants ranging from three inches to four feet in height, along with about 29 pounds of dried marijuana flowers.

Bourque was busted for transportation of marijuana, possession of marijuana for sale and violation of probation. Additional charges for conspiracy to commit a felony and cultivation of marijuana are being sought.

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