Industrial Hemp

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/hemporg/public_html/news/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 34.

Washington: Historic Industrial Hemp Crop Planted In Moses Lake

HempLogic at Moses Lake, WA

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

Last year, the Washington Legislature voted to permit industrial hemp. Today in Moses Lake, industrial hemp seeds were planted. This historic event, which was presented by the Washington Hemp Industries Association and sponsored by HempLogic USA and Hemp Ace International, celebrated the first legal planting of the versatile, valuable industrial hemp crop in Washington State in approximately 90 years.

The commemoration featured agronomic and regulatory guidance from experts, hemp industry leaders and the Washington State Department of Agriculture.

Pennsylvania: Industrial Hemp Sown For First Time In Decades

Penn Hemp 2017

Industrial Hemp was an important crop and a major industry in Pennsylvania, grown in the Commonwealth until the 1940’s

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

For the first time in over 80 years, researchers and farmers are allowed to cultivate hemp in Pennsylvania, with permits. The new law allows permit holders to grow up to five acres of industrial hemp.

After fifty years of growing acres of various crops at his family's farm near Milton, Abram Ziegler has turned to industrial hemp to help his farm.

Kentucky: Industrial Hemp Processing Plant Expands In Louisville

Sunstrand

The processing plant fibers are being developed to create furnace filters and filaments for 3D printing

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

Sunstrand, a Louisville-based hemp processing plant, is a biomaterials company that processes hemp, kanaf, flax, and bamboo for industrial and technical applications. In 2014, the business started in Okolona, after Kentucky allowed industrial hemp. The company's new 25,000-square-foot plant is more than four times larger than its original location. The company has contracts with several Kentucky farmers to grow hemp, and their fibers are being developed to create furnace filters and filaments for 3D printing.

Colorado: Governor Hickenlooper Signs Hemp Bill Protecting Water Stored In Federal Reservoirs

Hempfield-2017.jpg

Senate Bill 117, which will protect hemp farmers who use water stored in federal reservoirs, passed 99-1

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

On Sunday, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper signed Senate Bill 117, the Recognize Industrial Hemp Agricultural Product for Agricultural Water Right, into law. The bill, which was introduced in the state Legislature by Sen. Don Coram, and sponsored by Rep. Marc Catlin, will ease complications when water from a federal project is used.

Kentucky: University of Louisville Studying Industrial Hemp for Fuel

KentuckyHemp2017

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

For a second consecutive year, the University of Louisville's Conn Center for Renewable Energy is planting industrial hemp at the school’s Belknap Campus. The university is planting two types of hemp and kenaf to research their potential as renewable energy resources.

The study will focus on the potential for the crops to fulfill energy needs and become a replacement source for biofuels, fibers and 3-D printer applications.

The research will be included in the Kentucky Department of Agriculture's Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program.

Interim president of U of L, Greg Postel, stated that researchers are seeking "unusual answers to renewable energy questions."

“Having the crops grow on campus actually raises awareness about the research that we have going on at Conn Center,” said Assistant Director Andrew Marsh.

"What we do with this plant matter is actually convert it into substances that will help solve energy problems, so the mission of the center is to work on technologies to lessen our dependence on fossil fuels, and this industrial hemp and kenaf planting is one of those research directions," said Marsh.

Many farmers in Kentucky believe hemp could help revitalize Kentucky’s agricultural sector, and the hope is the research at Conn will help students and scientists study the crop’s potential as a fuel.

Syndicate content