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Oregon: 142 Marijuana Applications Received On First Day

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Monday was the first day for license applications to enter Oregon's new recreational marijuana retail market, and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission had received 142 applications by 8 a.m. Tuesday morning.

Seventy-five of the applications came from growers, most of them planning operations in Clackamas, Jackson, Lane and Multnomah counties, reports Noelle Crombie at The Oregonian.

Oregon doesn't plan to cap the number of marijuana licenses it will issue. According to a report from the liquor commission, the state will issue a total of 850 recreational marijuana licenses by the end of next year.

Applications are being accepted from marijuana processors, wholesalers, retailers, producers, laboratories and researchers, but as of Tuesday morning, no labs or researchers had applied, according to the OLCC.

The counties with the largest number among all applicants so far, according to the OLCC, are Multnomah County with 30; Clackamas County with 18; Jackson County with 17 and Lane County with 16 applications.

Michigan: Advocates Submitting Signatures To Decriminalize Marijuana In Three Cities

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Marijuana advocates in Michigan say they're excited about getting proposals on the November ballot in Ferndale and Jackson -- and possibly in Lansing -- to make possession of cannabis no worse than getting a traffic ticket.

"I have 600 signatures here," said Andrew Cissell, 25, of Ferndale on Tuesday morning, reports Bill Laitner of the Detroit Free Press. Cissell turned in a pile of petitions at the counter of City Clerk Cherilynn Brown -- almost double the number the proposal needed to qualify for the November ballot, Brown said.

"We will check these and then present them to City Council on August 12," Brown told Cissell as a crowd of supporters looked on.

"To me, this is a no-brainer," Cissell said. "If alcohol's legal, I think marijuana should be, too."

Activists in Jackson handed in petitions for a similar proposal to decriminalize small amounts of cannabis, according to Tim Beck, 61, of Detroit, chairman of the Safer Michigan Coalition.

"We have provided every signature, and our surveys show this is going to pass," Beck said. Beck, a retired CEO of an employee health insurance firm, has spent more than a decade advocating the legalization of marijuana.

Ferndale Police Chief Tim Collins sneered at the efforts, calling them "a waste of time." Possession of marijuana would still be illegal, Chief Collins said, "and the law's the law."

Michigan: Medical Marijuana Is Not A Fringe Issue

Photo - Michigan: Medical Marijuana Is Not A Fringe IssueBy Steve Elliott
Hemp News

If medical marijuana is a fringe issue, as some in Michigan claim, then "that's one large fringe," according to Michigan op-ed writer Brad Flory.

"It is fashionable to write off the medical-marijuana movement as a fringe group, a fact I discovered two weeks ago in feedback from upstanding citizens annoyed by my soft-on-weed views," Flory wrote on Mlive.com on Thursday.

"Softness on weed was not my intention," he wrote. "I didn't say anything good, bad or indifferent about marijuana or its medicinal value.

"What I said was this: Medical marijuana is only kinda-sorta legal four years after the voters of Michigan legalized it, which is not the way things should work in a healthy democracy," Flory wrote.

"The problem is, state government has created no legal method for selling medical marijuana to people who qualify for it," Flory wrote. "That is not my definition of legalizing something."

Medical marijuana was passed by an overwhelming 63 percent of Michigan's voters.

"For every 37 voters in Michigan who opposed legalization of medical marijuana, 63 supported it," Flory wrote. "It passed in all 83 counties, including ones always described as Republican, conservative and religious."

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