janel ralph

South Carolina: Mom Legally Making, Selling Medical Marijuana CBD Extract

PalmettoSynergisticResearch

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A mother in South Carolina is manufacturing cannabis oil, legally. The oil is high in cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive but medicinal component of marijuana that is now legal in the state under S. 839, which allows for consumable hemp products with less than .3 percent of THC.

"I'm building my company here," said Janel Ralph, reports Molly Grantham at WISTV.com. "I think it'll be up and running in maybe six months. But I'm an optimist. I guess I can't say exactly on the timeline."

Janel's company, Palmetto Synergistic Research, will specialize in CBD oil.

Because of the controversy surrounding marijuana, Ralph is keeping her location secret.

"There will be people who would intentionally try to steal it not knowing that it's hemp," she said. "Criminals could hear I'm manufacturing medical marijuana and think they could take it.

"They wouldn't understand that what I'm making has such a low THC, that even if they took they plants they couldn't smoke it or sell it as marijuana," she said. "You can't get high on what I'm making."

Ralph started it all last year because of her five-year-old daughter, Harmony, who has a genetic condition called lissencephaly. Harmony's brain is missing one of her chromosomes, and she has lots of seizures. Multiple pharmaceuticals didn't work.

South Carolina: Police Oppose Expanding Sick Children's Access To Medical Marijuana

TomDavis(SouthCarolinaStateSenator)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

South Carolina state Sen. Tom Davis (R-Beaufort), author of a bill which made it legal for parents to possess the marijuana derivative cannabidiol (CBD) oil to control their children's seizures, plans to introduce another bill on January 13, the first day of the upcoming legislative session, to allow low-THC marijuana to be grown in the state. But state law enforcement has already expressed opposition to the plan.

Davis said he first heard about CBD oil from a constituent whose granddaughter in Charleston was having 80 to 90 seizures an hour, reports Steve Jones at The State. Within two weeks of his constituent's granddaughter getting CBD oil, Davis said, the seizures were reduced by 80 percent.

After researching, Sen. Davis learned that CBD oil had helped people in other states, so he introduced a bill which passed and was signed into law by Gov. Nikki Haley last summer. The new law made legal the possession of CBD oil to treat children with uncontrollable epileptic seizures, as long as it was authorized by a physician.

The bill limits the amount of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that can be in the oil (THC is the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana). It is limited by the bill to just 0.09 percent, far below what is needed to produce a high.

South Carolina: Legislative Panel Hears Pleas For Clarity On CBD-Only Medical Marijuana Law

SouthCarolina-JanelRalphAndHarmony

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

South Carolina lawmakers earlier this year passed one of those "CBD only" bills that allow parents to possess cannabidiol oil, derived from the marijuana plant, for treatment of epileptic seizures. But CBD oil can't be legally made in South Carolina, and it's against federal law to transport it across state lines, so a new Medical Marijuana Study Committee is working out the details of how, exactly, to implement their new law.

That committee met for the first time on Wednesday at the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia, reports Robert Kittle at WSPA.

CBD oil doesn't have the mind-altering effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the which gets users high. As written, South Carolina's CBD-only law is just for patients in a clinical trial to treat epilepsy, and it provides no way for them to legally obtain the oil.

Janel Ralph of Myrtle Beach, whose five-year-old daughter Harmony has lissencephaly, which causes seizures, wants the law expanded so that it's not just a clinical trial and not just for epilepsy. She said the law, as written, doesn't really help.

"You're saying you can get it," she said. "You're saying you can give it to your child, and yes we're going to let you do this. But then they're not giving you any way to actually get it legally."

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