labeling

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Colorado: Cannabis Business Alliance Applauds 2016 Legislative Session

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As the 2016 legislative session comes to a close in Colrado, The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) on Thursday applauded legislators for what it called "the hard work and the goals achieved during the 2016 session."

“The 2016 legislative session has been eventful for the cannabis industry,” said Mark Slaugh, CBA executive director and iComply CEO. “Many of the bills that were up for discussion this session will have a major impact on our industry, and we are looking forward to seeing how some of these bills and laws change the landscape of the cannabis industry in Colorado for the better.”

“Consumer and public safety are CBA’s top priorities, which is why we are working to bring best practices to the industry to ensure consumers are educated about how and when to consume cannabis,” Slaugh noted. “CBA’s goal is to provide our members and the industry with insight to the bills being proposed, as well as sensible legislation for the industry. The industry has embraced many of the bills up for discussion this session and will work with the state to promote industry best-practices.”

The Retail Marijuana Sunset Bill (HB 1261)

"The Cannabis Business Alliance (CBA) applauds the Assembly for its prudent review of the Sunset Bill."

Purchasing Regulations

U.S.: Thursday Webinar To Address Quality Control In Medical Marijuana

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A Thursday press briefing via Webinar will address the need for better quality control in medical marijuana products.

The briefing, hosted by RTI International, will address the public health risks arising in this unregulated market due to factors such as:

• Product types and formulations that vary from state to state, store to store, even product to product;
• Inaccurate product labeling and marketing claims;
• Limited testing of medical marijuana products for safety and efficacy; and
• Lack of professional guidelines and governmental regulations. This places the burden on the consumers and providers to be aware of the above factors and how they affect dosing and ultimately, safety.

This briefing comes at a time when the number of medical marijuana users is on the rise in the U.S. and even presidential candidates on the campaign trail are calling for more research.

Marijuana itself, of course, is as safe as it ever was. But as big corporate money and big corporate mass production methods have come to the medicinal cannabis world, the mom-and-pop atmosphere of trust and safety which had distinguished the industry from the rest of the cut-throat economy is fading away. Production is increased by using chemical fertilizers and harsh pesticides, and those who are focused only on profit and not on healing are looking only at the bottom line.

U.S.: Best Practices Advocated For Labeling, Manufacturing Cannabis and Hemp Products

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Groups convene in Washington, DC for third annual national medical cannabis conference March 27-31

The American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) Cannabis Committee, in coordination with Americans for Safe Access (ASA), and the Hemp Industries Association (HIA), has announced the release of a joint statement advocating for implementation of best practices for the regulation of consumable, topical, and inhalant cannabis and hemp-derived products to ensure quality and consumer safety.

These best practices were developed with the input of numerous industry experts and establish common language and defined terms for the transparent and accurate labeling of these products to support responsible commerce and informed use of the cannabis plant.

AHPA, ASA and HIA will be promoting these best practices at the 3rd Annual National Medical Cannabis Unity Conference being held March 27-31, in Washington, DC.

Recommendations for plant part identification

The AHPA Cannabis Committee has established a policy that lawfully-marketed products consisting of or including Cannabis spp. ingredients that are intended for oral ingestion, topical application, or inhalation be labeled to identify the part of the Cannabis plant from which the ingredient is derived (e.g., seed oil, flower extract, or extract of aerial parts). This policy does not apply to parts of the Cannabis plant provided to consumers in unprocessed and recognizable forms.

Colorado: Cannabis Chamber Urges Common Sense Labeling and Education

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The Colorado Cannabis Chamber of Commerce (C4) on Wednesday emphasized its commitment to advancing responsible, common sense labeling of marijuana products in order to prevent accidental ingestion and promote child safety.

“If we’re truly interested in protecting our children and encouraging responsible cannabis use, it is absolutely imperative that we operate on facts over fear,” said Tyler Henson, President of C4. “We cannot allow the ‘newness’ of edible marijuana products to cause false panic and cloud our judgment or our lawmaking.”

As such, the C4 Chamber announced it strongly supports legislation that will increase the effectiveness of cannabis packaging by reducing “white noise” and drawing attention to child safety through proper storage.

Current label regulations require information that does not allow for the average-sized product packaging to have the room to provide important warnings in large enough font to be effective.

By advocating for highlighted warnings on packaging, like “Keep the Products out of Sight and Reach of Children” and to “Keep this Product in Its Original Packaging”, the C4 Chamber joins other government and health agencies in echoing this step as the most solvent reform.

U.S.: Drug Policy Alliance Says Marijuana Edibles Should Be Tested and Regulated

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The Drug Policy Alliance on Tuesday released an official statement on marijuana-infused products -- "edibles" -- which it says "are an important part of the burgeoning marijuana market." The DPA recommends laboratory testing, labeling, and regulation of the products.

The statement applies to cannabis-infused foods, drinks, tinctures, "or any other product infused with marijuana that is often consumed orally," according to the DPA.

"For many consumers, these products are a better option than smoking," the statement reads. "Infused products are also vital to people who use marijuana for medical reasons, because their effects last longer and can be manufactured with doses that meet patients' needs in a reliable way. However, proper regulation is necessary to ensure reliability and safety."

According to DPA, the products should be regulated and tested to ensure safety, quality and reliability of information. DPA recommends labeling edibles "with detailed information to ensure that consumers are informed about what they are consuming and educated on how to safely consume, and that all edibles should be kept away from children."

DPA is advocating for four main principles when it comes to cannabis infused products.

1. Edibles must be kept away from children.

2. Edibles must be clearly labeled.

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