Maine

Maine: Terminally Ill N.H. Woman Will Finally Access Medical Marijuana On Friday

LindaHoran[InDepthNH]

A terminally ill woman who successfully sued the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services to obtain the state’s first medical marijuana patient ID card will visit a medical marijuana dispensary in Portland, Maine on Friday.

Linda Horan of Alstead, who suffers from Stage 4 lung cancer, will visit Wellness Connection of Maine, where she will be accompanied by New Hampshire State Rep. Renny Cushing and several of her supporters.

“I feel better already, knowing that I will not have to spend my final days in a narcotic stupor,” Horan said. “I look forward to visiting the dispensary, learning about which products would be best for treating my symptoms. I will finally receive the medicine I need, and I won’t need to fear being treated like a criminal for it.”

Horan filed a lawsuit against DHHS Commissioner Nicholas Toumpas on November 5, asking the agency to immediately issue her a medical marijuana ID card so that she could begin obtaining medical marijuana legally in Maine and using it without fear of arrest in New Hampshire. On Nov. 24, a Merrimack County Superior Court Judge ordered the DHHS to issue her a card.

DHHS is responsible for administrating the state’s medical marijuana program, which has experienced several delays since Gov. Maggie Hassan signed it into law in July 2013. The agency began accepting applications from patients interested in participating in the program, but patients remain at risk of arrest and prosecution until they receive program ID cards.

New Hampshire: Judge Orders Health Dept. To Issue Medical Marijuana Card To Terminal Cancer Patient

LindaHoran[InDepthNH]

With an ID card, Linda Horan will be able to obtain medical marijuana legally in Maine and use it without fear of arrest in New Hampshire; Horan sued DHHS after it refused to issue ID cards until dispensaries open next year

A Merrimack County Superior Court Judge on Tuesday ordered the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to issue a medical marijuana ID card to a woman with terminal cancer in order to expedite her access to medical marijuana.

Linda Horan of Alstead filed a lawsuit against DHHS Commissioner Nicholas Toumpas earlier this month, asking the agency to immediately issue her a medical marijuana ID card so that she can begin obtaining medical marijuana legally in Maine and using it without fear of arrest in New Hampshire.

DHHS is responsible for administrating the state’s medical marijuana program, which has experienced several delays since Gov. Maggie Hassan signed it into law in July 2013. The agency began accepting applications from patients interested in participating in the program, but patients remain at risk of arrest and prosecution until they receive program ID cards. DHHS is refusing to issue ID cards until dispensaries open, which is not expected until 2016.

Horan, who suffers from stage IV lung cancer, filed an application with DHHS after receiving approval from all five of her physicians.

Maine: Marijuana Legalization Campaigns Unite Behind One Ballot Measure

MaineMultipleMarijuanaLeaves

Two competing marijuana initiative campaigns in Maine on Friday announced they will unite behind one state ballot measure to end marijuana prohibition in 2016.

The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol will stop collecting signatures in support of the initiative it filed in March and spearhead the campaign in support of a similar initiative filed in February by Legalize Maine.

Each of the campaigns has collected approximately 40,000 signatures, and they will work together to collect the remaining signatures needed to qualify for the November 2016 ballot. They have until January to collect a total of approximately 61,000 valid signatures of registered Maine voters.

“Joining forces is the best step forward, not only for our respective campaigns, but for Maine as a whole," said David Boyer, campaign manager for the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol. "We all agree marijuana prohibition has been a colossal failure and that it must be replaced with a system in which marijuana is legal for adults and regulated like alcohol.

"We can more effectively accomplish our shared goal by combining our resources and working together instead of on parallel tracks," Boyer said.

“We had some differences of opinion on some of the specifics, but our initiatives were largely similar overall," Boyer said. "We would not get behind this measure unless we were 100 percent confident that it will effectively and responsibly end prohibition in Maine. We’re also confident that the voters will agree.”

U.S.: Alzheimer's Association Conference To Recognize Legitimacy of Medical Marijuana

AAIC-AlzheimersAssociationInternationalConference2015

Wellness Connection of Maine will be the first-ever medical marijuana dispensary invited to present at this year’s national conference

In light of a recent study that shows low levels of a compound found in marijuana may slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, this year’s Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) in Washington, D.C. will -- for the first time ever -- recognize the plant’s potential use in the treatment of the brain disease.

Representing the nation’s medical marijuana industry will be Becky DeKeuster, cofounder and director of Community & Education at Wellness Connection of Maine, the largest provider of medical marijuana in the Northeast.

DeKeuster has worked as a trailblazer in the medical cannabis industry for 15 years, operating in all facets, including direct patient care and legislative efforts. Her poster – #4275 – titled, “Therapeutic Cannabis in Dementia Care: Policy and Practice,” will be the first presentation of marijuana’s potential role in the treatment of Alzheimer’s.

Twenty-three states plus the District of Columbia allow medical cannabis – nearly half of these having legalized medicinal use of the plant within the last five years.

The AAIC will host international investigators, clinicians and care providers to share the latest studies, theories and discoveries in dementia science. The conference will include more than 85 sessions and 1,800 poster and oral presentations featuring the latest dementia research around the world.

Maine: Campaign To Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Raises More Than $53,000 In 2nd Quarter

Maine2016RegulateMarijuanaLikeAlcohol

The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol reported Wednesday that it raised $53,011 in the second quarter of 2015 in support of a ballot initiative to end marijuana prohibition in Maine.

“Mainers are clearly excited about the opportunity to end marijuana prohibition,” said campaign manager David Boyer. “Most people agree that it’s time for our state to adopt a more sensible marijuana policy, and that’s exactly what we’re proposing. Regulating marijuana and taxing it like alcohol just makes sense.”

Maine residents accounted for more than 90 percent of the 190 total contributions that were made to the committee during the three-month period. The largest contribution, $50,000, was made by the Marijuana Policy Project, which has more than 200,000-plus supporters around the nation, including approximately 4,000 in Maine.

“The campaign is in full swing,” Boyer said. “In addition to raising thousands of dollars, we have already collected several thousand signatures. If we can maintain this momentum, I’m confident we will have what it takes to qualify for the ballot and run a strong campaign in 2016.”

The campaign is in the process of collecting the 61,123 signatures of registered Maine voters that are needed to qualify the initiative for the November 2016 ballot.

The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol is supporting a 2016 statewide ballot initiative to end marijuana prohibition in Maine and replace it with a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed similarly to alcohol. For more information, visit http://www.RegulateMaine.org.

Maine: State Lawmakers Choose Not To Place Marijuana Referendum On Ballot

MaineRegulateMarijuana[USE][TheSmokingBud]

Maine state lawmakers on Monday decided they will not place a measure on the ballot to regulate and tax marijuana for adult use. LD 1380, sponsored by Rep. Diane Russell (D-Portland), was defeated in the House 45-98 and in the Senate without a recorded vote.

State senators on Monday unanimously killed another pro-legalization bill, LD 1401, sponsored by another Portland Democrat, Rep. Mark Dion, reports Mario Moretto at the Bangor Daily News.

“The legislature’s failure to act should not be mistaken for waning public interest in marijuana policy reform," said David Boyer, campaign manager for the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, which is in the process of placing a citizen initiative on the 2016 ballot that would end marijuana prohibition in Maine. "Elected officials have always followed the citizens’ lead on this issue.

"Maine voters will still have the final say, and we expect they will say it’s time to end marijuana prohibition," Boyer said.

“Marijuana prohibition is a counterproductive and antiquated policy," Boyer said. "Most people are just fed up with it at this point. It’s time to regulate marijuana, tax it, and start treating it similarly to alcohol.”

For more information on The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, visit http://www.RegulateMaine.org.

Graphic: The Smoking Bud

Maine: Backers of Marijuana Legalization Initiative To Kick Off Petition Drive Thursday

MaineMarijuanaLeaf

Campaign staff and volunteers will hold a news conference on Thursday at 12 noon EST in Monument Square prior to fanning out and collecting signatures

The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol will kick off its petition drive Thursday in support of a statewide initiative to end marijuana prohibition in Maine and replace it with a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed similarly to alcohol.

Campaign staff and volunteers will hold a news conference at 12 p.m. EST at Monument Square in Portland prior to fanning out and collecting signatures from pedestrians in the area.

“We’re excited to get out there and start talking to voters about the initiative and the many ways in which regulating and taxing marijuana will benefit our state,” said campaign manager David Boyer.

“When Portland voted overwhelmingly in support of making marijuana legal for adults, local officials opted to use state law to continue punishing people,” Boyer said. "We couldn’t think of a better place to launch the effort to end marijuana prohibition at the state level."

Initiative backers must collect the signatures of at least 61,123 registered Maine voters by January in order to qualify the initiative for the November 2016 ballot. A summary of the initiative and the full initiative text are available on the campaign’s website at http://www.RegulateMaine.org.

WHAT: News conference to launch the petition drive in support of the statewide ballot initiative to regulate and tax marijuana like alcohol in Maine

WHEN: Thursday, June 4, 12 p.m. EST

Maine: Judge Denies Marijuana Defendant's Request To Visit Dying Dad

MalcolmFrench[KevinBennett-BangorDailyNews]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A federal judge on Tuesday denied a request from a man convicted for cultivating marijuana to visit his dying father. Ironically, the denial came 10 days after the father had died.

U.S. District Judge John Woodcock ruled that Malcolm French, 53, was a flight risk because of his estimated worth of $14 million and the long prison sentence (between 20 and 24 years) that he's facing, reports Judy Harrison at the Bangor Daily News.

"The court appreciates Mr. French's desire to physically see and speak with his father and it regrets having to reject Mr. French's request," Judge Woodcock ruled.

French, of Enfield, Maine; Rodney Russell, 51, of South Thomaston; and Kendall Chase, 58, of Bradford were found guilty of a number of charges in the Township 37 marijuana plantation case on January 24, 20-14, after a 10-day jury trial.

All have remained behind bars while awaiting sentencing. Dates for their sentencings have not yet been set. Judge Woodcock said in his most recent ruling that French, who is being held at the Piscataquis County Jail, would most likely be sentenced in late June.

Last month, Judge Woodcock had denied the defendants' joint motion for a new trial, reports Johanna S. Billings at the Bangor Daily News.

Maine: University To Host Marijuana Policy Debate April 20

PotLeafFist[MaineMedicalMarijuana]

The Maine Law Federalist Society will host a debate between supporters of a statewide initiative to make marijuana legal for adults and regulated like alcohol and opponents of marijuana policy reform on Monday, April 20.

The debate will feature David Boyer of the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol and Scott Gagnon of Smart Approaches to Marijuana, and will take place at noon in the Middle Room of the University of Maine School of Law.

The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol is currently collecting signatures to place an initiative on the 2016 ballot that would allow adults 21 years of age and older to possess up to one ounce of marijuana, grow up to six marijuana plants in their homes, and possess the marijuana produced by those plants.

The measure would establish a tightly regulated system of licensed marijuana retail stores, cultivation facilities, product-manufacturing facilities, and testing facilities, and create rules governing the production, testing, transportation, and sale of marijuana and marijuana-related products, such as testing, labeling, and packaging requirements.

Municipalities would be allowed to prohibit the operation of marijuana establishments. Marijuana would be subject to a 10 percent sales tax in addition to the standard sales tax, and revenue generated by marijuana sales would be allocated public education.

WHAT: Marijuana policy reform debate hosted by Maine Law Federalist Society

WHEN: Monday, April 20, 12:00 p.m. ET

Maine: Medical Marijuana Inspectors Hired By State For The First Time

MaineMedicalMarijuanaInspection[BangorDailyNews]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The state of Maine has, for the first time, hired an outside group to inspect medical marijuana growing operations, a move being heavily criticized by patient advocates who say the process is poorly planned. The inspections have already begun, with many caregivers being quite surprised when they happen?

The Maine Department of Human Services last month signed a one-year contract with the Maine Sheriffs' Association, of all groups, agreeing to pay them $167,000 to inspect cannabis growing operations across the state, reports Michael Shepherd at CentralMaine.com.

“The department has contracted with the sheriffs association to provide follow-up investigations on complaints that are medical marijuana related,” DHHS spokesman David Sorensen said Friday, reports Nok-Noi Ricker at the Bangor Daily News. “They are not current deputies; they are retired law enforcement personnel," he claimed. "They are essentially investigators. They are not acting as law enforcement agents.”

The inspections are primarily for caregivers, said DHHS spokesman David Sorenson. Caregivers, under Maine's medical marijuana law, are allowed to grow cannabis for up to five patients who have doctors' authorizations to use the herb medicinally.

Maine: Statewide Ballot Initiative To Legalize Marijuana Filed Tuesday

Maine-RegulateMarijuanaLikeAlcohol

Measure backed by diverse committee of Maine citizens — including state and local officials, businesspeople, and clergy — would establish a legal market for licensed businesses to sell marijuana to adults 21 and older

A statewide ballot initiative to regulate marijuana like alcohol will be filed Tuesday with the Maine Secretary of State.

The leader of the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, David Boyer of Falmouth, will submit the language along with the signatures of five registered Maine voters who support the measure, as required by state law. The five signers will be State Rep. Diane Russell of Portland; local farmer and former Republican State Rep. Aaron Libby of Waterboro; Androscoggin County Commissioner and Lewiston School Board Member Matt Roy; Rev. Deane Perkins of Belfast; and Sherry DaBiere, a York-based real estate agent and grandmother.

“I am supporting this initiative because it will make Maine a safer place for my children and my grandchildren,” DaBiere said. “Marijuana should be regulated and controlled so that we know who is selling it, what they’re selling, and where it’s being sold.

"I do not want future generations to be exposed to the same failed prohibition laws that I had to grow up with," DaBiere said. "It’s time to end the reefer madness.”

Maine: Race To Legalize Marijuana Heating Up With Competing Initiatives

MaineTheWayLifeShouldBe

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

With two citizen referendums competing for the ballot -- either of which would legalize recreational marijuana in Maine -- Democratic state Rep. Diane Russell is introducing a bill in the Legislature which would accomplish the same goal through regulation and taxation.

Rep. Russell said that cannabis legalization is inevitable in Maine, with three marijuana-related bills alreadyu under consideration by lawmakers, reports Jonah Bennett at the Daily Caller.

Russell's bill would reinstate liquor inspectors and put them in charge of marijuana, as well. Marijuana would be regulated similarly to alcohol under her plan.

"It would dedicate tax revenue, significant tax revenue, to school construction so that we can make sure we're building new schools and remodeling old schools so our children have an opportunity to have a solid education," Russell told CBS 13.

There is growing uncertainty in Maine around exactly how cannabis legalization will look in the state, with competing initiatives from the Marijuana Policy Project and Legalize Maine vying for the ballot in 2016.

Maine: Former Top Drug Prosecutor Gets 16-Year Prison Sentence For Child Pornography

JamesCameron

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The former top drug prosecutor in Maine -- who fled out of state after he was convicted of child pornography charges -- is going to federal prison for almost 16 years.

James Cameron, convicted in 2010 of 13 counts of child porn, had posted bail and was released pending an appeal, reports Catherine Pegram at WABI TV.

He took off out of state in November 2012, and was caught in New Mexico a month later.

Cameron's lawyer was pushing for a 6-1/2 year sentence.

Cameron was sentenced Wednesday in federal court in Bangor to 15 years and 9 months in prison.

Photo: WABI TV

Maine: Two Marijuana Legalization Measures Could Be On 2016 Ballot

MaineMultipleMarijuanaLeaves

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Maine voters could be looking at not one but two marijuana legalization measures on the 2016 ballot, if two competing groups are both successful at qualifying for the ballot.

Legalize Maine, based in the northeastern part of the state, on Wednesday announced a plan to have its own measure on the ballot, joining the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), which has already announced its referendum, reports Sarah Delage atr WCSH.

Paul McCarrier of Legalize Maine said the group is focused on jobs. According to McCarrier, marijuana legalization would bring economic development to rural areas.

McCarrier said his group is moving forward with its own legalization plan after talking with people in other states who have worked with the Marijuana Policy Project.

"We are not interested in being subjugated to MPP or the Washington D.C. policy," McCarrier said. "These will be competing measures and we will win."

MPP, based in the District of Columbia, plans to put a similar question on the 2016 ballot. The group put the question to voters in Portland and South Portland, where it was approved, and in Lewiston, where voters rejected it.

"Ideally it makes sense to have one initiative," said David Boyer of MPP. "But if we can't see eye to eye then we will move forward and we hope voters choose the plan that will make marijuana legal and stop punishing adults for using a substance safer than alcohol."

Maine: South Portland Becomes 2nd East Coast City To Legalize Marijuana

DavidBoyer(MPP)SpeaksAtSouthPortlandCityHall

Similar Measure Receives 45% Support in Lewiston

Stage is set for 2016 statewide initiative to regulate marijuana like alcohol

Voters in South Portland, Maine on Tuesday approved a ballot measure by a 52 percent to 48 percent margin, making it the second city on the East Coast to make marijuana legal for adults. A similar measure received 45 percent of the vote in Lewiston.

The South Portland initiative makes possession of up to one ounce of marijuana legal for adults 21 and older. It will remain illegal for adults to consume or display marijuana in public.

Voters in Portland, Maine's largest city, approved a similar measure last year.

Tuesday's measure expresses support for ending marijuana prohibition at the state level and replacing it with a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed similarly to alcohol. The Marijuana Policy Project, which backed all three local initiatives in Maine, has filed a committee to support a statewide ballot initiative in 2016.

“We applaud the voters of South Portland for approving a more sensible approach to marijuana," said David Boyer, Maine political director for the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), which supported the Lewiston and South Portland initiatives. "They saw through the scare tactics and misinformation that have long kept marijuana illegal in this country. They chose facts over fear."

Maine: Marijuana Initiative Backers To Celebrate Election Night In South Portland

MaineMarijuanaDontTreadOnWeed

Voters in Lewiston and South Portland are considering ballot measures that would make marijuana legal for adults 21 and older

Backers of the initiatives to make marijuana legal for adults in Lewiston and South Portland, Maine, will celebrate Election Night at Thatcher’s Restaurant in South Portland (35 Foden Road). The event will begin after the polls close at 8 p.m. ET. Free Wi-Fi access and parking will be available.

The ballot measures — Question 2 in Lewiston and the “Citizen-Initiated Ordinance Referendum Question” regarding marijuana in South Portland — would make possession of up to one ounce of marijuana legal for adults 21 years of age and older. It would remain illegal to use or display marijuana in public.

Portland voters approved a similar measure 67-33 in November 2013.

The Lewiston and South Portland initiatives also express support for ending marijuana prohibition in Maine and replacing it with a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed similarly to alcohol.

The organization backing the measures, the Marijuana Policy Project, has filed a committee to support such a statewide initiative in 2016.

WHAT: Election Night watch party for the campaign in support of the Lewiston and South Portland ballot measures to make marijuana legal for adults

WHEN: Tuesday, November 4, after the polls close at 8 p.m.

WHERE: Thatcher’s Restaurant, 35 Foden Rd., South Portland

WHO: David Boyer, Maine Political Director, Marijuana Policy Project

U.S.: States, Cities and Nation's Capital To Vote On Marijuana Policy Ballot Measures Tuesday

Vote[MarijuanaLeavesBallotBox](Reason)

Alaska and Oregon could make marijuana legal for adults and regulate it like alcohol; Washington, D.C. and two of Maine’s largest cities could make marijuana legal for adults; Florida could become 24th state to allow seriously ill people to access medical marijuana

States, cities, and the nation’s capital will vote on marijuana policy ballot measures on Tuesday.

“From Alaska to Maine, there is a whole lot of enthusiasm for ending marijuana prohibition,” said Mason Tvert, director of communications for the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP). “It’s not easy to overcome 80 years of prohibition and anti-marijuana propaganda. But public attitudes are clearly shifting on this issue, and it’s only a matter of time before that is reflected in laws nationwide.”

In Alaska and Oregon, voters are considering statewide ballot measures that would make marijuana legal for adults and regulate it similarly to alcohol. The initiatives — Ballot Measure 2 in Alaska and Measure 91 in Oregon — would remove all legal penalties for possession of up to one ounce of marijuana by adults 21 and older.

The measures would also establish a regulatory framework for licensed businesses to cultivate, process, test, and sell marijuana to adults. If the initiatives are approved, Alaska and Oregon would be the third and fourth states to end marijuana prohibition.

Maine: Marijuana Initiative Backers Unveil Halloween-Themed Mobile Billboard

MarijuanaLessToxic!LessAddictive!(MobileBillboard)

Mobile Billboard Highlights the Relative Safety of Marijuana Compared to Alcohol

Billboard satirizing ‘Reefer Madness’-style propaganda calls Question 2 ‘[a] safer marijuana policy for Lewiston’ because it would allow adults to use a substance that is ‘Less toxic! Less addictive! Less scary than ALCOHOL!’

Backers of the initiative to make marijuana legal for adults 21 and older in Lewiston unveiled a Halloween-themed mobile billboard Tuesday that highlights the relative safety of marijuana compared to alcohol.

The orange and black billboard, which will run through Halloween, satirizes “Reefer Madness”-style propaganda and calls Question 2 “[a] safer marijuana policy for Lewiston” because it would allow adults to make the safer choice to use marijuana instead of alcohol, if that is what they prefer. It features a screaming face and reads, “MARIJUANA: LESS toxic! LESS addictive! LESS scary than ALCOHOL!”

Facts regarding the relative safety of marijuana compared to alcohol are available at http://www.MarijuanaIsSafer.org .

Question 2 would make possession of up to one ounce of marijuana legal for adults 21 years of age and older. It would remain illegal to use marijuana in public.

The measure also expresses support for ending marijuana prohibition in Maine and regulating and taxing marijuana like alcohol at the state level.

Maine: Backers of Lewiston Marijuana Initiative To Launch Mobile Billboard

MarijuanaLessToxic!LessAddictive!LessScaryThanAlcohol!

Halloween-themed Mobile Billboard Highlights the Relative Safety of Marijuana Compared to Alcohol

Billboard satirizing ‘Reefer Madness’-style propaganda comes as opponents ramp up efforts to scare voters into keeping marijuana illegal for adults; ad calls Question 2 ‘[a] safer marijuana policy’ because it would allow adults to use a substance that is, ‘Less toxic! Less addictive! ‘Less scary than ALCOHOL!’

Backers of the initiative to make marijuana legal for adults 21 and older in Lewiston, Maine, will launch a Halloween-themed mobile billboard on Tuesday that highlights the relative safety of marijuana compared to alcohol. The Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) will hold a news conference in front of the billboard at 10 a.m. ET in Heritage Park. The ad will run through Halloween.

The orange and black billboard, which satirizes “Reefer Madness”-style propaganda, comes as opponents of Question 2 are ramping up efforts to scare voters into keeping marijuana illegal for adults. It features a screaming face and reads, “MARIJUANA: LESS toxic! LESS addictive! LESS scary than ALCOHOL!”

It calls Question 2 “[a] safer marijuana policy for Lewiston” because it would allow adults to make the safer choice to use marijuana instead of alcohol, if that is what they prefer. Facts regarding the relative safety of marijuana compared to alcohol are available at http://www.MarijuanaIsSafer.org .

Question 2 would make possession of up to one ounce of marijuana legal for adults 21 years of age and older. It would remain illegal to use marijuana in public.

Maine: Marijuana Legalization Advocate Challenges Police Chief To Pot vs. Booze Drug Duel

Alcohol vs Marijuana jpg

Local advocate willing to go ‘hit for shot’ with Chief Edward Googins — who said, ‘Claims that marijuana is safer than alcohol are so bogus it’s not even funny’ — to prove once and for all that marijuana is less harmful than alcohol

David Boyer will be waiting for Googins at high noon in the Mill Creek Park gazebo — with enough alcohol to kill a man — to determine who will be the last one standing for a 7 p.m. debate

In order to prove once and for all that marijuana is less harmful than alcohol, marijuana initiative proponent David Boyer is challenging South Portland Police Chief Edward Googins to a drug duel. Boyer will be in the Mill Creek Park gazebo at high noon on Wednesday prepared to take a hit of marijuana for every shot of alcohol consumed by Googins to see who will be the last man standing for a previously scheduled debate for 7 p.m. that evening.

In an October 14 news story Chief Googins said, “Claims that marijuana is safer than alcohol are so bogus it’s not even funny.” He also said marijuana is too dangerous to make legal for adults because it “continues to create and perpetuate other problems.”

Chief Googins made a similar comment during a press conference at the Mill Creek Park gazebo earlier this year. He is actively campaigning against a citizen-initiated referendum on the November ballot that would make possession of up to one ounce of marijuana legal for adults 21 years of age and older under city law.

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