MAPS

U.S.: DEA Approves PTSD Marijuana Study

veteran and marijuana.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The Drug Enforcement Agency has approved a study on the effect of medical marijuana on post traumatic stress disorder. It will be the first randomized, controlled research in the U.S. for PTSD that will use the actual plant, and not just oils or synthesized marijuana.

Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, or MAPS, say the DEA's approval gives researchers the OK to purchase marijuana for the study from the National Institute of Drug Abuse.

The group should begin recruiting and enrolling participants as early as June, MAPS spokesman Brad Burge said.

"The contract with the state of Colorado was signed on April 20 — an unofficial national holiday in some circles — meaning the funds are en route to MAPS. We are now preparing to place the order for the marijuana for the study," Burge said in an email to Military Times.

Colorado in 2014 awarded a $2 million grant to MAPS for the research and at the same time gave an additional $5.6 million to several other organizations to support medical marijuana studies.

U.S.: Fired Professor Nominated For $2M Grant To Study Marijuana, PTSD

SueSisley(Cannabis-PTSDResearcher)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Colorado is welcoming once-shunned marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, who in a controversial move was fired from her former position at the University of Arizona.

Dr. Sisley, who was sacked in July, has been nominated for a $2 million grant from the state of Colorado to continue her medical research, reports Nina Golgowski at the New York Daily News.

The research pioneer expressed suspicion that her abrupt termination was due to political influence. Up until now, Dr. Sisley had feared that her study of the effects of cannabis on post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, would be halted without a lab.

With the proposed generous grant -- awaiting a board's December 17 decision -- Sisley's study into the potential benefits of cannabis, especially, to U.S. veterans, could continue.

"That's the beauty of this grant," Sisley told AZ Central. "The Colorado Health Department believed in the quality of this research regardless of whether I was aligned with an Arizona university or not."

Sisley's study plans to examine 76 veterans with PTSD, half of whom will be in Arizona -- where a private donor has offered her free lab space -- while the other half will be at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

Arizona: State Senator Blocks Funding for Long-Sought Medical Marijuana Research

ArizonaStateSenatorKimberlyYee

Clinical Trial for Veterans with PTSD Has Already Obtained Approval from U.S. Food and Drug Administration, U. Arizona Institutional Review Board, and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Wednesday, April 2: Veterans, Military Family Members and Supporters to Rally at Wesley Bolin Memorial Plaza

After 22 years of hard-fought efforts, the nonprofit pharmaceutical company MAPS has finally obtained approval from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for a FDA clinical trial to examine the medical safety and efficacy of marijuana. The trial would study military veterans suffering from treatment-resistant post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Yet the study’s ability to receive Arizona state funding is in jeopardy due to State Senator Kimberly Yee.

Arizona has collected millions of dollars from its medical marijuana program. Under Arizona’s medical marijuana law, that money is reserved for furthering the provisions of the law and should include research and education – but none of it has been spent.

A bill being considered by lawmakers would give the Arizona Department of Health Services discretion to use some of this surplus funding to study the medical benefits of marijuana. On March 10, the bill HB 2333, sponsored by State Representative Ethan Orr of Tucson, passed the Arizona House 52-5, with strong bi-partisan support.

United States: The Case for Treating PTSD in Veterans With Medical Marijuana

Studies have already shown the benefits of marijuana for those suffering from PTSD, but can our government agencies be convinced?

By Martin Mulcahey, The Atlantic

There is a truth that must be heard! Researchers are one bureaucratic hurdle away from gaining approval for the first clinical examination on the benefits of marijuana for veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), working under the auspices of the University of Arizona College of Medicine, are preparing a three-month study of combat veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. The plan is on hold until the National Institute on Drug Abuse and Public Health Service (part of the Department of Health and Human Services) agrees to sell researchers the marijuana needed for research -- or until the marijuana can be legally imported. Social and political intrigue surrounding this research is far reaching, attracting opposing factions who must cede biases for the greater good and well-being of servicemen and servicewomen.

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