marijuana edibles

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Colorado: New Rule Requires Marijuana Edible Labeling

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

A new rule takes effect in Colorado Saturday, requiring that edible marijuana products come with a diamond-shaped stamp and the letters T-H-C — not just on the packaging but on the brownies, candies and other edibles themselves.

The rule referencing marijuana’s psychoactive ingredient (tetrahydrocannabinol or THC) was added after complaints that the treats look too much their non-intoxicating counterparts. It is the first such requirement in any state with legal weed.

The stamping requirement comes in addition to extensive labeling and packaging rules that include childproof zippers and lids, along with warnings that the product should be kept away from children and not eaten before driving or while pregnant or nursing.

“We want to ensure that people genuinely know the difference between a Duncan Hines brownie and a marijuana brownie, just by looking at it,” said state Rep. Jonathan Singer, a Democrat who sponsored the law requiring stamped edibles.

Andrew Schrot, founder of BlueKudu, a company which makes marijuana-infused chocolates, said that when he started his company in 2011 for medical marijuana customers, his pot treats looked like any other chocolate bars. But he said the switch to a recreational market in which new marijuana users were trying his products necessitated change.

Oregon: Recreational Marijuana Shoppers Can Buy Edibles And Extracts Starting June 2

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Recreational marijuana users in Oregon will be able to purchase pot-infused edibles and extracts starting next month.

Anyone 21 and older has been able to purchase a small amount of marijuana since October.

The sale of marijuana-infused edibles will start on June 2.

The Oregon Health Authority issued a bulletin this week detailing what is allowed:

Retail customers can buy one low-dose marijuana infused edible per day at medical marijuana dispensaries that sell to recreational customers. "Low dose" means an edible with no more than 15 milligrams of THC.

They also can buy:

-- Non-psychoactive marijuana-based topical products, like lotions and balms, that contain no more than 6 percent of THC.

-- One pre-filled catridge or container of marijuana extract per day. This type of product is typically consumed using a portable vaporizer device. The container may not contain more than 1,000 milligrams of THC.

Gov. Kate Brown signed Senate Bill 1511, the law allowing the expanded recreational sales, on March 29.

US: Scientists Develop Method To Detect Marijuana Amounts In Edibles

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A group of scientists say they have invented a new technique for measuring levels of tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) in food made with marijuana, according to a press release from The American Chemical Society (ACS).

Most edibles are analyzed using a high performance liquid chromatograph, or HPLC, but the readings are notoriously inaccurate.

"These machines were never designed for you to inject a cookie into them," Jahan Marcu, director of research and development at Green Standard Diagnostics Inc. and a senior scientist at Americans for Safe Access said. "The sugars, starches and fats will wreak havoc on HPLC equipment. They can really muck up the works and lead to inaccurate results."

Marcu, along with others working with the ACS, developed a new method of testing that breaks down the edible into distinct particles that are better read by the HPLC.

Scientists first place samples of food laced with cannabis into a cryo-mill with dry ice or liquid nitrogen. Then they add abrasive diatomaceous earth and grind the mixture to create a homogenous sample.

Using a technique called flash chromatography, the scientists are able to separate the various chemical components of the sample which allows them to inject liquid containing only the cannabinoids into an HPLC for analysis.

Canada: New Marijuana Edible -- Weed Nutella

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Peanut butter and jelly, shrimp and grits, biscuits and gravy; things that seem to just naturally go well together. Thank you, Canada: we now have weed-infused Nutella.

Nutella is the delicious chocolate and hazelnut spread enjoyed since World War II. The new product, Chrontella, is the famous spread with 300 mg of cannabis extract swirled throughout.

Available at some dispensaries in Canada, a small jar costs about $23. The product is quite potent; a small jar is considered three servings. You might not want to consume it in one sitting.

The folks behind Chrontella also make a weed-infused peanut butter named Pif and Smokers Strawberry jam.

Wyoming: Marijuana Edibles Bill Dies In House

 In Wyoming, a bill to regulate marijuana edibles died in the House.

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

A bill seeking to establish penalties for possession of marijuana edibles and beverages containing cannabis failed Monday in Wyoming when it missed a legislative action deadline.

Last week the Wyoming Senate passed a bill to make it a felony to possess more than three ounces of food or drink containing marijuana or its active ingredient, THC. However, the House Judiciary Committee removed the felony language after listening to testimony that it's difficult to measure how much THC is present.

Ever since Colorado legalized recreational marijuana in 2014 Wyoming has seen a great increase in possession of marijuana edibles and beverages. Neighboring Montana has medical marijuana.

The Wyoming Supreme Court has not ruled on the issue, possibly leaving district judges across the state to interpret the law differently.

Rep. Charles Pelkey, D-Laramie, voted to remove language specifying possession of marijuana edibles as a felony in last week's House Judiciary Committee. He said the debate over how to test THC levels demonstrated "the futility of the state trying to regulate what is essentially a plant."

Pelkey, an attorney, said he expects the Legislature will address regulation for marijuana edibles before the next year's general legislative session.

Colorado: Food Safety Training For Marijuana Edibles Makers, Responsible Selling For Budtenders Launched

MaureenMcNamara(CannabisTrainers)

Edibles makers to learn proper hygiene, prevention of food contamination, emergency procedures, and more

“Budtenders” to learn responsible selling practices based on lessons of alcohol industry

The National Cannabis Industry Association (NCIA) on Tuesday announced that it will launch the first ServSafe© Food Safety Basics course specifically for cannabis industry professionals. Participants in the course, based on a curriculum developed originally by the National Restaurant Association, will learn about the significance of food-borne illness, proper personal hygiene, time and temperature control, how to prevent cross-contamination, cleaning, sanitizing and emergency procedures, and more.

“The interest in edibles and other infused products keeps growing,” said NCIA deputy director Taylor West. “We know our industry is under a microscope, and we want to make sure cannabis product-makers continue developing the highest quality and safest products possible.”

NCIA also announced a new Sell-SMaRT™ Responsible Cannabis Vendor course that will teach marijuana dispensary employees, or “budtenders,” responsible selling practices, such as how to check ID, educate customers about responsible consumption, and handle tricky situations.

These courses are developed and facilitated by Maureen McNamara, founder of Cannabis Trainers™, an NCIA member business. McNamara has been teaching the ServSafe© course to traditional food industry professionals for the last 18 years, but this will be her first course geared solely for makers of marijuana edibles.

Michigan: Appeals Court Rules Weight of Medical Marijuana Edibles Doesn't Count Toward Limits

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The weight of brownies and other marijuana-infused foods cannot be counted towards total weight limits on cannabis possession under Michigan's medical marijuana law, a state Court of Appeals ruled on Friday.

In the first ruling of its kind, a three-judge appeals court panel ruled that marijuana edibles containing THC extracts from cannabis are not "usable marijuana" as defined by the 2008 voter-approved act, reports Chad Livengood at The Detroit News.

The ruling stems from a case in Oakland County against Chambers," as was erroneously reported by a medical marijuana patient and caregiver, Earl Cantrell Carruthers (not "Earl Cantrell Chambers" as was erroneously reported by http://detroit.cbslocal.com/2013/07/12/mich-court-rules-marijuana-edible... Detroit and Mlive.com), who was charged with possession of cannabis with intent to deliver following a January 27, 2011, traffic stop.

Registered caregivers who grow marijuana for medicinal purposes are allowed to possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis each for a total of five registered patients, meaning a total of 12.5 ounces, under the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act.

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