medical marijuana

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/hemporg/public_html/news/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 34.

Missouri: New Medical Marijuana Law Submitted

Missouri.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

A bill has been filed in Missouri to allow access to medical marijuana throughout the state. House Bill 437 was introduced yesterday by Republican Jim Neely. The initiative would add marijuana to a list of experimental drugs, products and devices that can be prescribed to eligible terminally ill patients under the “Right to Try Act.”

Missourians fighting for their lives don’t have time to wait for the FDA to approve investigational treatments that contain cannabis,” said Neely, a Republican Representative and physician who lost his daughter to stage four cancer in 2015.

Missouri attempted to get medical marijuana on the ballot in November 2016 with an initiative backed by New Approach Missouri. The initiative fell short of making it on the ballot by 23 signatures.

Florida: Medical Marijuana Available Starting Today

Florida mmj.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Today marks the first day that patients in Florida have access to medical marijuana, and doctors are experiencing an influx of patients the new law is bringing in.

Doctors will not be handing out marijuana immediately, however. Doctors and state health officials have up to six months to create a plan for distributing the drug, under the new law.

Qualified physicians who have completed an eight-hour training course regarding medical marijuana will be allowed to prescribe two types of marijuana. Patients with cancer or a condition that causes chronic seizures or muscle spasms may qualify to receive low-THC marijuana, which has very low amounts of the psychoactive ingredient THC and does not usually produce the “high” commonly associated with marijuana.

If a patient has been determined to be terminally ill by two physicians, they may qualify for medical marijuana which contains significant levels of THC.

Some conditions that may qualify a patient for one of the treatments include cancer, seizures, muscle spasms, AIDS, glaucoma, and Parkinson's disease.

Oregon: Dispensaries, State Work To Continue Recreational Marijuana Sales

Oregon.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

New rules affecting recreational marijuana retailers in Oregon take effect January 1.

Saturday will be the end of limited retail sales from the Oregon Health Authority, which began in October 2015, following the passing of Measure 91. Recreational sales and licenses will be governed by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission starting January 1. Medical dispensaries that wanted to continue selling recreational are working to beat a Sunday deadline to pay fees and file applications.

Mark Pettinger, spokesman for the OLCC Recreational Marijuana Program, said the organization is processing hundreds of applications from around the state.

“It’s a challenging time right now,” Pettinger said. “There are a lot of moving parts to all of this.”

Kayla Dunham, owner of The Agrestic In Corvallis, is planning a grand opening of a second location Sunday under the new law. She just received approval from the OLCC on Tuesday.

“There is always worry when what you’re trying to do is in the hands of someone else,” she told the Corvallis Gazette-Times. “And especially with these bureaucratic agencies, but every experience I’ve had so far with the OLCC has shown us they are motivated.”

“They’ve been extremely fast with their processing,” Dunham said. “They seem to have a lot of devotion to making sure things happen in the right way.”

Florida: Senator Wants State To Pay For Marijuana Research

pot leaf 2.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Marijuana is still classified by the federal government as a dangerous drug with no medicinal benefit, making research on the drug difficult. But a powerful state senator in Florida wants to change that.

Senator Bill Galvano said we need to know more and wants the state of Florida to pay for research.

"We are relying on anecdotal evidence," Galvano said. "We have a dearth of research from the feds for a variety of reasons, and it's important for us to understand both the benefits and potential hazards of this plant and drug as we go forward."

Galvano said he would send money to Moffitt Cancer Center at USF. Other universities, such as Florida A&M, may get some as well.

Legislation was expanded earlier this year to include legal medical marijuana for terminally ill patients and that expansion specifically allowed research in Florida universities.

"We have a product that has some medical relief that comes with it, so we'll be looking at what are the actual features of the plant that may be more medicinally important for the pharmaceutical industry," said Tim Moore, FAMU VP for research.

Nevada: Thousands Of Medical Marijuana Dispensary Applications Accidentally Leaked

purple bud.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The Nevada state government website has accidentally leaked the personal information of over 11,700 applicants for dispensing medical marijuana.

All of the applications, each one eight pages in length, include the person's full name, home address, citizenship, and even their weight and height, race, and eye and hair color. The applications also include the applicant's citizenship, their driving license number, and social security number.

How many years the applications date back is unknown.

A spokesperson for the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services has confirmed that the website has been pulled offline to prevent incidents of violations of privacy.

The state government will be notifying applicants of the leak in the next few days.

Nevada was one of the first states to legalize medical marijuana in 2000 and voted to legalize recreational marijuana in its recent election.

Maryland: Officials Warn Of Medical Marijuana Scammers

bud 2.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Scammers are taking advantage of medical marijuana patients in Maryland that are still months away from being able to legally obtain cannabis, according to industry officials and regulators.

There are reports of companies selling "marijuana cards" or offering exams to "preapprove" medical marijuana patients.

Officials say neither of these is legitimate.

“They are telling patients that they have the ability to preapprove them for the medical cannabis program, and that is a lie,” said Darrell Carrington, executive director of the Maryland Cannabis Industry Association. “There is no such thing as preapproval.”

No physicians in Maryland have yet been authorized to issue certifications for legal medical marijuana. The Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission has issued preliminary licenses to businesses to grow and dispense marijuana, but none have received final licenses or begun operation.

“We know there are already attempts at fake patient identification cards being promulgated,” Patrick Jameson, executive director of the commission, said in a statement. “This type of fraudulent activity preys against the most vulnerable people in society and we will do everything possible to stop this behavior. Only patient identification cards issued by the Commission are legitimate. At this point no ID cards have been issued.”

U.S.: Study Says States With Medical Marijuana Have Lower Traffic Fatality Rates

pot in jars.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

A new study shows that states with legal medical marijuana have fewer traffic fatalities than those without.

Researchers at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health reported that states with legal medical marijuana laws have an 11 percent reduction in traffic fatalities on average. The report is based on the researchers examining 23 states with medical marijuana laws, and the District of Columbia.

Silvia Martins, an associate professor and physician, was the senior author of the report. She theorized that the lower traffic fatality rates could be because people are substituting pot for booze, especially younger people, and therefore these states are seeing less alcohol-impaired driving.

The report indicated that there was little indication of a reduction in traffic in drivers 45 and older. The age group of 15 to 44 experienced the largest drop in traffic fatality rates in states.

“We found evidence that states with the marijuana laws in place compared with those which did not, reported, on average, lower rates of drivers endorsing driving after having too many drinks,” Martins said in a written statement. She said other factors that might help explain the correlation could be the “strength of public health laws related to driving, infrastructure characteristics, or the quality of health care systems.”

Montana: Judge Rules To Reopen Medical Marijuana Dispensaries

Montana mmj.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Voters ended the Montana Marijuana Act last month, renaming it the Montana Medical Marijuana Act. One change that came with the renaming was a three-patient limit on providers, a change that closed medical dispensaries all over the state, leaving thousands of patients with no provider.

The limit, which took effect in August, was overrruled last week by District Judge James Reynolds.

"The folks that are maybe the most in need are the least able to provide, to grow their own," Reynolds said about his ruling, as reported by the Associated Press. "I think speed is more important than niceties."

The Montana Cannabis Industry Association expected the three-patient limit to be eliminated with the passing of the new initiative, but it was not.

"It punished the patients and the sickest people in the state," Bobby Long, owner of the Flower dispensary in Missoula, told the Missoulian. "It helped the black market and hurts people who were trying to do the right thing."

"The people who work providing marijuana in Montana were — let's face it — they were jerked around quite a bit," lobbyist Kate Cholewa told the AP. "They are somewhat used to it, and very good at coming back."

Mexico: Senate Passes Medical Marijuana Bill

Mexico.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Mexico may soon have legal medical marijuana available after its senate passed new legislation Tuesday to approve cannabis use for qualified patients. The bill, which was submitted to congress by President Enrique Pena Nieto early this year, still must be approved by the lower house before medical marijuana becomes legal in Mexico.

Mexico started allowing medicine with cannabidiol, an active chemical ingredient of marijuana, in 2015. The medicine was only granted on a case-by-case basis, however. The new law would allow patients with a variety of medical issues to use the plant and cannabis products containing tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, marijuana's psychoactive ingredient.

"It's been years that we've been fighting for acknowledgment and approval and recognition of the medical and therapeutic uses of cannabis, and today we finally have something,” Lisa Sanchez of Mexico Unido Contra la Delincuencia, a crime-stopping organization, told Reuters.

The measure was approved by the Mexican senate with a vote of 98-7.

California: San Diego May Allow Medical Marijuana Dispensaries To Sell To Everyone 21 And Over

CA weed.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

San Diego has become the first city in California to introduce legislation to allow medical marijuana dispensaries to sell to everyone 21 and older until the state's new recreational use regulations are finalized.

The ordinance also establishes rules for recreational cannabis outlets, which should be opening sometime in the first half of 2018. The rules are almost identical to those in place for medical cannabis dispensaries, including a requirement of being 1,000 feet from public parks, schools, daycare centers, churches, playgrounds, libraries and residential neighborhoods.

“While we haven’t completed a detailed review of this proposal, the city’s highly restrictive zoning for medical cannabis dispensing has proven effective at protecting the quality of life in our neighborhoods, and using the existing restrictions as the model for these new regulations is a good starting point,” said Phil Rath of the United Medical Marijuana Coalition. “We look forward to engaging this process moving forward to ensure the regulations are clear, enforceable and allow our members to continue to operate peacefully in our respective communities.”

Thanks to last month's passage of Proposition 64, adults over 21 in California can possess up to an ounce of marijuana, and grow up to six plants at home.

Arizona: Medical Marijuana Patients File Lawsuit Against State

Arizona 2.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Two registered medical marijuana patients have filed a lawsuit against the state of Arizona with the goal of reducing the annual registration fee for patients. Yolanda Daniels and Lisa Becker both claim the state is hoarding the funds and failing to reduce fees as the 2010 law that legalized medical marijuana required.

The lawsuit claims that the state's Department of Health's account balance was $11.5 million at the end of 2015. The Department collected $2.6 million more than is necessary to run the program from caregivers, patients, and dispensaries, according to attorney Sean Berberian.

“In a time when medication is more expensive than ever, the state should be helping to make it cheaper for Arizonans,” says Berberian. “The state is deliberately squatting on the excess fund instead of refunding it to patients or using it in furtherance of the Arizona Medical Marijuana Act, such as to help patients.”

Berbarian says that former-Governor Jan Brewer “influenced the setting of the initial patient and caregiver card prices to keep many qualifying patients from accessing legal medication.” He notes that current Governor Doug Ducey remains opposed to medical cannabis.

Texas: Bill Filed To Legalize Medical Marijuana

medical marijuana 2.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Texas state Senator Jose Menendez filed a bill today that would allow people with chronic and debilitating conditions to use medical marijuana to treat those conditions through a prescription from a doctor.

Senator Menendez says if traditionally conservative states like Montana, North Dakota and Arkansas can pass such a measure, Texas should follow suit.

Illnesses like cancer, PTSD, nausea, Parkinson’s, autism, HIV and severe pain are a few of the ailments that would qualify.

Political science professor Doctor Paul Fabrizio told KIDY the road to approval for this bill is a difficult one. If passed in both the House and the Senate, there’s still one huge obstacle.

“If they were to get it passed, they’re gonna have to convince the governor. The governor has been very outspoken in saying he does not support legalization of medical or recreational marijuana. Therefore, he’s not going to sign a bill,” Fabrizio said.

Minnesota: PTSD Added to List of Qualifying Conditions For Medical Marijuana

Minnesota mmj.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The Minnesota Department of Health is adding post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to its list of conditions that can qualify patients for medical marijuana.

Minnesota now joins New Jersey, Michigan, California, Illinois, Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Mexico, Arizona, Washington, Rhode Island and Oregon as states that allow those with PTSD to legally use medical cannabis.

A large amount of research has led to the conclusion that medical marijuana can be useful for "innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders,” according to a government-funded study released in 2014.

Another study released in 2015 found that; “When inhaled or delivered orally or transdermally, cannabinoids (the psychoactive components of unrefined marijuana and various derivative products) activate endogenous cannabinoid receptors, modulating neurotransmitter release and producing a wide range of central nervous system effects, including increased pleasure and alteration of memory processes…. Those effects provide a pharmacologic rationale for the use of cannabinoids to manage the three core PTSD symptom clusters: reexperiencing, avoidance and numbing, and hyperarousal.”

New York: Chronic Pain Added To List Of Approved Conditions For Medical Marijuana

NY mmj.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

New York just added chronic pain to the list of conditions that can qualify a patient for medical marijuana in the state.

The New York Department of Health issued a statement saying a regulatory amendment outlining the addition of chronic pain and its conditions has been drafted and will be published for public comment soon.

“After conducting a thorough review of the scientific literature, it became clear that there may be certain benefits in the use of medical marijuana by patients suffering from chronic pain,” said Health Commissioner Dr. Howard A. Zucker in the statement. “Medical marijuana is already helping thousands of patients across New York State, and adding chronic pain as a qualifying condition will help more patients and further strengthen the program.”

The state’s laws already allow medical marijuana for those suffering from cancer, HIV/AID, ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, damage to spinal cord nervous tissues, epilepsy, inflammatory bowel disease, neuropathies, and Huntington’s disease.

Ireland: Legal Medical Marijuana Possible In The Near Future

Ireland mmj.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Ireland's minority government said on Thursday that it would not block a first reading of a bill backed by all other parties to legalize medical marijuana.

Health Minister Simon Harris, whose government is not large enough to block legislation, said he would seek amendments in the near future after completion of a review of scientific and clinical advice that was commissioned earlier this month.

"While there are elements I do not and will not support, I don't wish to divide the Dail (parliament)," Harris said in a statement, adding he had made clear he wanted to see policy in this area reviewed.

"I share the concerns of patients who believe that cannabis should be a treatment option for certain medical conditions and I recognize the urgency and worry they feel."

Harris said he wanted any references in the bill that could lead to legalization for recreational use to be removed, changes that left-wing opposition lawmaker Gino Kenny said would be acceptable.

"It's been overwhelming, not only in the Dail, but to see the people who have contacted us and who are trying to access medical cannabis for themselves or their children," Kenny, a People Before Profit Alliance party lawmaker, told national broadcaster RTE.

Arizona: Phoenix Suns Coach Earl Watson Challenges Steve Kerr's Views On Marijuana

Watson and Kerr.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Phoenix Suns coach Earl Watson disagrees with Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr on his views that marijuana should be recognized as a pain reliever.

In an interview Saturday, Watson told ESPN that Kerr's remarks about pot being a valid alternative to prescription drugs could be a "slippery slope" for young fans of the league.

“I think our rhetoric on it has to be very careful because you have a lot of kids where I’m from that’s reading this, and they think (marijuana use is) cool,” Watson said following his team’s 138-109 loss to the Warriors. “It’s not cool. ... So when we really talk about it and we open up that, I call it that slippery slope.”

He said that Kerr should leave the treatment of a players pain to a doctor.

“I think it would have to come from a physician — not a coach,” Watson said, according to ESPN. “And for me, I’ve lived in that other life (of crime and drugs). I’m from that area, so I’ve seen a lot of guys go through that experience of using it and doing other things with that were both illegal. And a lot of those times, those guys never make it to the NBA, they never make it to college, and somehow it leads to something else, and they never make it past 18.”

U.S.: NBA Issues Statement Regarding Steve Kerr's Marijuana Use

Steve Kerr 2.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The NBA has already made a statement regarding Warriors coach Steve Kerr admitting he had tried medical marijuana for chronic back pain, which led to several of his players coming out in support of him and the acceptance of medical marijuana by the league.

Kerr acknowledged he had tried marijuana two times in the last year on Monte Poole’s CSN Bay Area podcast on Friday. He also mentioned that he wasn’t sure or not if he’d be in trouble for doing so, or if he was subject to being drug tested.

The NBA issued the following statement on Saturday:
“All of our coaches are drug tested each season. Marijuana is included on our banned substances list. There are medical exceptions to our policy but, in this case, it’s not relevant because Steve said he did not find marijuana to be helpful in relieving his back pain.”

So much for his admission bringing up a dialogue about medical marijuana's acceptance by the NBA.

California: NBA Coach Of The Year Kerr's Marijuana Admission Could Be A Start

Steve Kerr.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Steve Kerr, head coach of the NBA's Golden State Warriors and reigning NBA Coach of the Year, has admitted to trying marijuana for medical reasons, and now some of his players believe that his words can help start a serious dialogue in professional sports about using pot for pain relief.

''You look at something that comes from the Earth. Any vegetable that comes from the Earth, they encourage you to eat it,'' Draymond Green, power forward for the Warriors, said at shootaround Saturday. ''It does make a little sense as opposed to giving someone a manufactured pill. If something takes your pain away like some of these pills do, it can't be all good for you. ... He talked about Vicodin. Toradal, you can be completely hurting and then take a Toradal shot and go through a game and feel nothing. Is that really good for you over the course of time? I doubt it.''

Green thinks the option of using medical marijuana "makes a lot of sense."

Kerr told Comcast SportsNet Bay Area's Warriors Insider Podcast with Monte Poole on Friday that he used medicinal marijuana. He admitted he tried marijuana twice in the past 18 months while dealing with debilitating back pain that still affects him this season. He said it really didn't help, but painkillers have been much worse.

Ontario: Study Shows Vaping Prevalent Among Medical Marijuana Patients

vaporizer.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Vaporization is increasingly becoming the preferred means of patients using medical marijuana, according to a survey with results published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence and in the Harm Reduction Journal.

Investigators from the University of Waterloo, School of Public Health surveyed the consumption habits of 364 patients registered in Canada's medical marijuana program. Authors reported that "the most popular mode of delivery for medical cannabis" among patients was vaporization. Those surveyed in the study said they preferred vaping because it "reduce[d] the negative health consequences associated with smoking."

Another study conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan surveyed 1,485 state-registered medical cannabis patients. Of those surveyed, 39 percent said they have vaporized cannabis during the past month. Most patients acknowledged smoking as the means of drug delivery.

Vaporizer technology heats marijuana to a point where cannabinoid vapors form, but below the point of combustion. Clinical trials evaluating the technology conclude that vaporization is a "safe and effective" cannabinoid delivery mode that "does not result in exposure to combustion gases."

Massachusetts: Study Shows Legal Medical Marijuana Not Predictive Of Increased Teen Use

plant.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

State laws regulating the use and dispensing of medical marijuana do not contribute to increased use of marijuana by teens, according to a new study published online ahead of print in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Researchers at Harvard Medical School and Brandeis University assessed marijuana use patterns among adolescents from 45 states between 1991 and 2011. Authors reported "little evidence for an increase in past-30-day marijuana use, or past-30-day heavy marijuana use, among adolescents in response to state-enacted MMLs (medical marijuana laws), regardless of most provisions."

The conclusions agree with several other studies that find changes in the statewide legal status of cannabis are not predictive of greater use by teens.

Syndicate content