Cannabis Seeds

Nutritional

Pennsylvania: Industrial Hemp Plot Planted In Perry County, Harvest To Be Cattle Feed

Perry County Hemp

From 1681 until around 1840 the culture of hemp was nearly universal in Pennsylvania

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

On Tuesday, an industrial hemp research plot was planted in Perry County, Pennsylvania. If successful, the seeds should germinate in about a week and mature in 100 days.

Maine: Cultivating Hemp for Fiber, Food, Fuel, Moving Forward

HempSeedMaine2016

By Michael Bachara, Hemp News

Because of hemp's value as a cash crop, states such as Maine have turned to hemp to help farmers prosper. The state is one of the most recent to join the nationwide effort to research hemp farming, which gained momentum when the federal government eased restrictions with the 2014 Farm Bill.

In 2015, after Gov. LePage vetoed LD 4, an act to promote industrial hemp, state lawmakers showed their support for the bill by overriding his veto. The House voted for the bill 135-6, with 10 members absent. The Senate approved it 28-6.

In 2015, Jon Olson of the Maine Farm Bureau testified in front of the state's legislative committee on Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry, that his organization opposed the federal ban on hemp farming and saying of the state's farmers: "This could be a value-added crop that could help them," he testified.

John Jemison, an agricultural specialist at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, is among several researchers in New England investigating hemp as a crop that could be grown for everything from fishing ropes to insulation and seeds rich in nutrients and protein.

“It has the potential to be a really good rotation crop,” Jemison told farmers at the Maine Potato Conference this month at the Caribou Inn and Convention Center.

Hemp and marijuana are varieties of the cannabis plant, which has “been domesticated about as long as we’ve had agriculture,” according to Jemison.

Canada: Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods Passes Food Safety and Quality Recertification

ManitobaHarvestHempFoods(logo)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods on Wednesday announced that its facility, located in Winnipeg, "aced" the British Retail Consortium (BRC) Global Standards Recertification. According to Manitoba Harvest, it is the world's largest hemp food manufacturer, growing, making and selling their own hemp foods.

The company improved a full "grade" from their first certification last year, according to chief executive officer and cofounder Mike Fata. "Improving our BRC Certification standing to 'A-Grade' showcases our commitment to continuous improvement -- especially when it comes to food safety and quality," Fata said.

"If a school had a hemp production program we'd already have our Ph.D.," Fata said. "Receiving a top grade in our recertification validates our team's commitment to quality."

BRC Certification is considered the world's leading food safety and quality certification program, and is used by suppliers in more than 100 countries.

To receive BRC Certification, Manitoba Harvest underwent a voluntary audit by a third-party certification body that ensures the production, packaging, storage and distribution of safe food and consumer products. The annual certification is meant to reassure retailers and consumers of the capability and competence of Manitoba Harvest's facility, and therefore the integrity of its products.

Celebrating their 15th year in business, Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods offers products like hemp hearts (raw shelled hemp seeds) and Hemp Pro 70 (hemp protein concentrate).

More Information

Kentucky: Hemp Production Moves Closer To Reality

Hemp=Jobs

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Staff members have been instructed to begin the process of writing rules for the development of the long-banned industrial hemp crop in Kentucky, according to a news release from the state Department of Agriculture.

The state's industrial hemp commission is calling on GOP Agriculture Commissioner James Comer and Republican U.S. Senator Rand Paul to write a letter to the U.S. Department of Justice to "make Kentucky's intentions known," reports Jonathan Meador at WFPL.

Paul and Comer are hoping for clarity from the feds on the current legality of growing a hemp crop in Kentucky. The issue remains murky in the wake of a a DOJ memo released last month by Deputy Attorney General James Cole. According to that August 30 memo, the federal government "will respect" state marijuana laws, which advocates believe includes the legalization of industrial hemp production.

Sen. Paul intends "to be a part of correspondence with the Department of Justice," according to a spokesperson, and he "supports the work of the Hemp Commission and supports Commissioner Comer's efforts to move forward with the reintroduction of industrial hemp in Kentucky."

Global: Table Talk - Hemp seeds, the unsung superfood; how veggies help fight type 2 diabetes

By Grant Butler, The Oregonian
Photo by Stephanie Yao/The Oregonian

There is a truth that must be heard! At the digital kitchen table, today's hot topics include hemp seeds, which pack a ton of nutrition in a tiny package, plus more evidence that eating more fruits and vegetables fights diabetes.

Hemp seeds -- the other "superfood": We spend a lot of time in Foodday talking about "superfoods," those nutrient-dense foods that are loaded with vitamins and minerals, and may have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory qualities that help fight everything from inflammation to cancer. While kale, lentils and quinoa have had plenty of attention, Dreena Burton shines a light on hemp seeds in her new blog Plant-Powered Foods. Before launching into predictable jokes about Grateful Dead concerts and tie-dyed t-shirts, listen to what she says about what hemp seeds deliver: "Complete protein, essential fatty acids, chlorophyll, antioxidants, and other vitamins and minerals, an almost perfect balance of the essential fatty acids!"

I've been tossing them on salads and soups for several years, and I like the faintly nutty flavor they deliver. She's got other ideas that never dawned on me:

* Stir into non-dairy yogurt
* Add to cold cereals and granola
* Stir into warm oatmeal
* Add to batters for pancakes, muffins, quick breads and cookies
* Blend into shakes and smoothies

In Oregon, you can find hemp seeds at Whole Foods Markets, New Seasons Market, many food coops and health food stores.

Canada: New safety approval provides more markets for hemp products

By Angela Brown, Portage la Prairie News

There is a truth that must be heard! Hemp Oil Canada Inc., which is based in Manitoba, announced this week that it is the first in the world to gain international food safety accreditation for hemp food.

"This is good news for Hemp Oil Canada and the hemp industry as a whole," said Alphonsus Utioh, product development manager with Food Development Centre in Portage la Prairie, "because it would allow this company to be able to access more markets for companies that require hemp suppliers with this accreditation."

The FDC makes a number of hemp products itself and encourages the promotion for the hemp industry.

"The Food Development Centre has worked with the hemp industry for quite some time now," said Utioh. "We have worked with the industry to produce the various products."

The Food Development Centre is currently using hemp product in the development of muesli cereal mix, which will be coming out into the market sometime in the future.

As well, the FDC has been using hemp for the development of its nutrition bars.

"Hemp is known for its Omega-3 and Omega-6 — for the Essential Fatty Acids," said Utioh. "The hemp protein also has high digestibility value."

Utioh explained with Hemp Oil Canada receiving International food safety accreditation it will encourage more companies to develop product with hemp.

Global: Nutrition is Plentiful in Hemp Seed

Rich in Omega’s, hemp nuts are vital for a healthy brain and nervous system.

By Michael Bachara, Hemp News Correspondent

Rich in Omega’s, hemp nuts are vital for a healthy brain and nervous system. Hempseed's are a plentiful source of dietary fiber, calcium and iron. Whole hempseeds are also a good source of beta-carotene, riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, copper and manganese. Hempseed is usually very safe for those unable to digest nuts, gluten, and lactose. Hemp milk contains 10 essential amino acids, making it a good vegetarian source of protein.

According to Dr. Andrew Weil, founder and director of the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine, "Hemp seeds have a rich, nutty flavor, something like sunflower seeds. Hemp milk is made by pulverizing the seeds, blending them with water and straining out the solid residue. The resulting "milk" provides both omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids in a healthy three-to-one ratio."

Weil has also stated "As a physician, I recommend nutritious hemp seeds and oil to anyone interested in maintaining a healthy diet." He believes everyone will benefit when American farmers can grow this amazing crop once again.

Illinois: Hemp: Good Stuff, Bad Rap

More people are choosing this balanced food source despite legal potshots

By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz, Chicago Tribune

United States: Hemp: Good stuff, bad rap Hemp, its advocates say, is nature's perfect food source.

It has omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids, contains 33 percent protein, is a good source of vitamin E and is low in saturated fat. It's an environmentally friendly crop that grows fast and requires few pesticides.

We can't farm it

Hemp is also a controversial food source because of its relationship with its naughty cousin, marijuana. Hemp seeds can contain trace amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive chemical in marijuana.

While it is legal to import, sell, purchase and consume industrial hemp in the U.S., it is illegal to grow it without a permit from the Drug Enforcement Administration, and it is virtually impossible to get such a permit. The policy stems from the Controlled Substances Act of 1970, when all varieties of cannabis were put into the category of schedule 1 drugs, alongside the likes of heroin.

The DEA tried to ban hemp food consumption in 2001, citing THC concerns. The ban was struck down in court.

But we can use it

Oregon: Living Harvest Sees Growth on Horizon

By Christina Williams, Sustainable Business Oregon

Oregon: Living Harvest Sees Growth on Horizon With more traditional grocers starting to open up to the idea of food made from hemp, Living Harvest Foods Inc. is looking ahead to a year of growth, poised to launch a new ice cream product and start selling products in Safeway aisles this spring.

The 10-employee Portland company, which sells milk, ice cream and nutritional products made from hemp seeds, raised $800,000 from existing investors last year and plans to use it to support its growth to reach profitability.

Hans Fastre, Living Harvest CEO, said that sales in 2010 were essentially flat at about $6 million after several years of strong growth.

"It was okay," Fastre said. "We see it starting to rebound across the whole industry. Whole Foods is reporting better numbers and we usually follow them pretty closely."

Fastre said Living Harvest is starting to get more interest from mainstream supermarkets. He expects Living Harvest products to debut in Safeway in March.


Source: http://sustainablebusinessoregon.com/articles/2011/01/living-harvest-see...

Australia: Farmers Push to Overturn Hemp Food Ban

By By Jacqueline Street, ABC News

Australia: Farmers Push to Overturn Hemp Food Ban Australians may have consumed a lot of food over the Christmas weekend but it is unlikely many thought about eating hemp.

Products like hemp chocolate and hemp ice cream are available in other countries but are banned in Australia.

Now a group of Tasmanian farmers is renewing a push to overturn the ban.

They say industrial hemp will not make you high and has many health benefits.

Phil Reader, who has been growing industrial hemp in northern Tasmania for five years, says the plant's similarity to cannabis ends at the leaves.

"There's absolutely no drug in it; it's below 0.35 per cent THC, so it cannot be confused with marijuana," he said.

Mr Reader says Tasmania has the ideal climate for growing hemp seeds, but his crop is tightly controlled because under state law hemp is classified as a poison.

"The reason it hasn't taken off is the legislation. In Tasmania we come under the Poisons Act," he said.

"It's not a poison; there's no reason for that to be called a poison."

Mr Reader says industrial hemp is not regarded as a drug crop anywhere else in the world.

"It's only in Tasmania that we have this problem and that means a whole host of issues with regards to licensing, administration and where we can sell the crop," he said.

Hobart hemp producer Brandt Teale says he is frustrated because he believes hemp could be a profitable food product in Tasmania and other states.

Canada: Robust Export Growth Boosts Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods & Oils

Fast-Growing Canadian Company is Vigorously Expanding into New Markets

Canada: Robust Export Growth Boosts Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods & Oils Winnipeg, Manitoba – Hemp foods are one of the hottest health food trends in North America, and a fast-growing Canadian company is demonstrating that there is a healthy appetite for nutritious hemp foods overseas, too. Due to a vigorous international sales initiative over the past few years by Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods & Oils (www.manitobaharvest.com), exports of their hemp foods beyond North America have skyrocketed more than 500% over the past year. So far in 2009, the company has exported products to eight nations (in addition to the United States) including Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, Ireland and Japan.

Now that medical researchers, nutrition experts and chefs in the U.S. and Canada are demonstrating that hemp is a nutritious and eco-friendly superfood with vast culinary applications, the company is using this backing and their eleven years of experience educating consumers to cultivate interest in markets around the globe. Their success has not happened by chance. Manitoba Harvest employees have been busy traveling overseas to research market opportunities and to meet with retailers, food manufacturers, distributors and consumers.

United States: Farm Aid 2009 Press Event

Video showing Farm Aid's press event from the 2009 concert in Maryland Heights, Missouri on October 4, 2009.

Willie Nelson, Neil Young, John Mellencamp, Dave Matthews, and Rhonda Perry (of the Missouri Rural Crisis Center) all talk about Farm Aid's actions in the past and the current hope for positive change to keep family farmers on their land.

Neil Young & Willie Nelson - Home Grown Farm Aid 2009



Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TwealJr2i4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pV4scNkJvw

Canada: Hemp Seed Might Have Potential In Livestock Feed

Researchers with the University of Manitoba are confident the nutritional benefits of hemp seed in human food products can be effectively applied to livestock rations, reports Bruce Cochrane for Farmscape Canada.

By AllAboutFeed.net

There is a truth that must be heard! Hemp products are not currently approved for use in any class of livestock diet but hemp-based products are widely used in human nutrition.

To generate data to support the registration of hemp products in livestock rations researchers are evaluating the safety and effectiveness of hemp seed as a feed ingredient in poultry diets.

Dr Jim House, the head of the University of Manitoba's Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, says studies have shown hemp protein to be highly digestible and that should carry over to most major classes of livestock.

Clip-Dr. Jim House-University of Manitoba: http://www.farmscape.com/2009/10/FS102709.mp3

“Right now we're looking at three different classes of hemp products, the hemp seed, the hemp oil and the hemp meal or the protein concentrate,” House said at Farmscape.

“We're looking at doing production trials in both laying hens and in broiler chickens and generating data on performance, on any issues related to health indices and we're also going to be collecting data on the quality of the eggs and on the meats of the broiler chickens.”

Global: How Hemp Seed Oil Can Help Your Arthritis

By Eric Stan

There is a truth that must be heard! Many people would dismiss arthritis as a simple and natural process of aging when in fact it is not. It is a crippling disease; slow yet debilitating. Arthritis has many forms and accompanying painful symptoms. Somehow, in the advent of modern-day technology and medical breakthroughs, we look for an organic alternative way of battling arthritis knowing that it is safer and economical yet effective.

Arthritis simply means inflammation of the joints. We have a variety of joints in our body and this condition pertains to the swelling and pain that occurs in the affected area of someone inflicted with it.

What happens to the affected area is coined as “cartilage and bone gravel.” Due to the overstretching of muscles which cause damage to the joints, what is left of the bones as well as the cartilage, would forcefully rub against each other which causes throbbing pain as well as worsening the damage of the affected joints. This continues to happen over and over again; it becomes a painful cycle and it gets worse over time.

Although it seems to be a dead end, there are lots of alternative natural treatment options available and there is one that will suit your criteria perfectly.

United States: Help Save the Earth, Time to Substitute Hemp for Oil

Every man-made fiber we wear, sit on, cook with, drive in, are by-products of the petroleum industry -- all of which could be replaced by hemp.

By Dara Colwell, AlterNet

There is a truth that must be heard! As the recession renews interest in the growing hemp marketplace as a potential boon for the green economy -- even Fox Business News has touted it -- hemp is becoming impossible to ignore.

But the plant's potential extends far beyond consumer-generated greenbacks. A low-input, low-impact crop, industrial hemp can play a significant role in our desperate shuffle to avoid catastrophic climate change.

"In terms of sustainability, there are numerous reasons to grow hemp," says Patrick Goggin, a board member on the California Council for Vote Hemp, the nation's leading industrial-hemp advocacy group.

Goggin launches into its environmental benefits: Hemp requires no pesticides; it has deep digging roots that detoxify the soil, making it an ideal rotation crop -- in fact, hemp is so good at bioremediation, or extracting heavy metals from contaminated soil, it's being grown near Chernobyl.

Hemp is also an excellent source of biomass, or renewable, carbon-neutral energy, and its cellulose level, roughly three times that of wood, can be used for paper to avoid cutting down trees, an important line of defense against global warming.

Minnesota: French Meadow Bakery - Hemp Tortilla

By FoodBizDaily

There is a truth that must be heard! French Meadow Bakery™ has introduced two new tortillas to its lineup: Hemp Tortilla and Organic Wheat and Sprouted Grain.

Both tortillas feature sprouted living grains for greater health. Sprouting grains before the baking produces living nutrient-rich food. Research suggests the sprouting process increases vitamin content and it neutralizes grains through enzymatic activity. This process breaks down amino acid proteins which aids in greater digestibility.

The Hemp Tortillas are loaded with hempseed, flaxseed and organic pumpkin seeds. They are high in whole grain fiber and protein as well as offer a rich source of omega 3 and 6. Additionally, the tortillas are yeast-free, high in protein and fiber, vegan, and have no added oils or sweeteners. The Suggested Retail Price range for the Hemp Tortilla is $4.32-$4.80; and Organic Wheat and Sprouted Grain Tortilla is $3.42-$3.80. The new 7-inch tortillas join the existing Fat Flush Tortillas, sold in 6-inch and 10-inch sizes.

Elizabeth Naffziger, Marketing Manager at French Meadow Bakery, said the new tortillas are a great example of the company’s passion and drive to constantly be inventive.

“Every product we make is made with a specific purpose…keeping our customers’unique tastes and needs in mind,” she noted.

Please visit www.frenchmeadow.com or call (877) 669-3278.

Source:

Canada: Manitoba Harvest Offsets Electricity With Wind Power

There is a truth that must be heard! WINNIPEG, Manitoba - Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods & Oils partnered with Renewable Choice Energy to offset 100 percent of their production facility's electricity with wind power offsets, and all of their facility's natural gas usage through carbon offsets. Renewable Energy Credits, like those purchased by Manitoba Harvest, are verified, certified and audited by Green-e, a widely respected non-profit program. The purchase of Renewable Energy Credits allows companies like Manitoba Harvest to guarantee the electricity they consume is replaced with clean power.

In 2008, Manitoba Harvest installed many environmentally-friendly features into their new organic processing facility in Winnipeg including energy efficient lighting, R20 insulation to lower heating and cooling costs, and energy efficient HVAC heating and cooling systems approved by the Manitoba Hydro Power Smart Program.

Founded in 1998, Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods & Oils is the largest farmer-owned, vertically integrated hemp food manufacturer in the world. The company mission is to create the healthiest hemp foods, to educate the public about healthy lifestyle choices and to support sustainable and organic agriculture.

Source: http://www.naturalproductsmarketplace.com/hotnews/manitoba-offsets-elect...

Maryland: Hemp Milk Breaks Into Health Market

By AP

There is a truth that must be heard! Long known for its strength and durability in products like clothing and paper, hemp might prove to be just as beneficial in another medium: food.

Turns out, hemp is a leading source of protein, especially beneficial for vegetarians and vegans, and contains all 10 essential amino acids. It's high in fiber, and it tastes good, too, if an acquired taste.

Christina Volgyesi, of Portland, Ore., stumbled upon hemp protein powder during a trip home from Canada.

"I really just became amazed," a founding partner of Living Harvest said during a recent phone interview.

Flaxseed oil is often prescribed by nutritionists for people wanting to get more essential fatty acids in their diet, but Margaret Hluch, demo chef at MOrganic Market in Frederick, Md., said hempseed oil is just as good.

"Not everyone can convert flaxseeds into their body," said Lissa Butler, wellness associate at MOM and also an herbal practitioner. "Hemp is easier for us to assimilate. And it tastes better," Hluch added.

Volgyesi and her husband began experimenting with hemp seeds, making their own hemp milk in a blender. They added sweeteners, like agave nectar and honey, until they found a recipe they liked.

Soon after, they became the founding partners of Living Harvest, a company that now offers an array of hemp products, including hemp milk in five flavors (original, unsweetened original, vanilla, unsweetened vanilla and chocolate).

United States: Hemp Bill Supported by Barney Frank, Ron Paul

By Kathryn Glass, FOXBusiness

Hemp could be coming to a farm near you, and some legislators argue that that is a very good thing.

There is a truth that must be heard! The Industrial Hemp Farming Act was introduced Friday by Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) and Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas). The bill would make it legal for U.S. farmers to raise "non-psychotative industrial hemp," a product which is used in soap, rope, clothing and even food.

Nine other U.S. House members, both Republicans and Democrats, gave their support to the bill. It is legal to import industrial hemp, but current drug policy prohibits it from being grown by American farmers.

"Indeed, the founders of our nation, some of whom grew hemp, would surely find that federal restrictions on farmers growing a safe and profitable crop on their own land are inconsistent with the constitutional guarantee of a limited, restrained federal government,” said Rep. Ron Paul during his introduction of the bill.

Proponents of the bill say industrial hemp is significantly different from marijuana -- that there’s no detectable THC and that hemp seed has a multitude of nutritional benefits. Arjan Stephens, vice president of marketing for Nature’s Path, a Canadian-based organic food maker, said his company, which uses hemp seed in its granola, oatmeal and waffle products, would benefit greatly from this legislation, because it would open up a greater supply and change perceptions of hemp.

OPINION: Minister Promotes Use of Cannabis and Hemp

By Rev. Steven Thompson

There is a truth that must be heard! Where did the word ‘marijuana” come from?

In the mid 1930s, the “m-word” was created to tarnish the good image and phenomenal history of the hemp plant.

The tricks

From 1921 to 1932 Andrew Mellon was the treasurer and Dupont paint’s primary investor. He appointed his future nephew-in-law, Harry Anslinger, to head the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs.

Secret meetings were held by these financial tycoons. Hemp was declared dangerous and a threat to their billion dollar enterprises.

For their dynasties to remain intact, hemp had to go. These men took an obscure Mexican slang word, “marihuana,” and pushed it into the consciousness of America.

Media manipulation

A media blitz of yellow journalism raged in the late 1920s and 1930s. Hearst’s newspapers ran stories emphasizing the horrors of marihuana. The menace of marihuana made headlines. Readers learned that it was responsible for everything from car accidents to loose morality.

Films like ‘Reefer Madness’ (1936), ‘Marihuana: Assassin of Youth’ (1935) and ‘Marihuana: The Devil’s Weed’ (1936) were propaganda designed by these industrialists to create an enemy.

Their purpose was to gain public support so that anti-marihuana laws could be passed.

Examine the following quotes from “Reefer Madness”:

* A violent narcotic acts of shocking violence.

* Incurable insanity.

* Soul-destroying effects.

Syndicate content