question 1

Maine: State Delays Recreational Cannabis Sales, Governor Urges Cannabis Crackdown

Maine Cannabis

Last November, ballot initiative Question 1 gave Maine lawmakers and regulators nine months to write the rules

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

Maine won’t be able to meet its February deadline to allow recreational cannabis sales, according to state officials.

Republican State Sen. Roger Katz said the agencies responsible for the recreational market rollout don’t have sufficient time before the deadline to perform such tasks as licensing growers, writing departmental rules and hiring new inspectors.

Last Month, Gov. Paul LePage stated he wished the Maine Legislature had repealed the referendum-passed law legalizing recreational cannabis use.

Maine: Marijuana Legalization Is Finally Confirmed

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The opposition for Maine's measure to legalize recreational marijuana, Question 1, finally dropped their request for a recount last weekend, meaning Maine residents can look forward to enjoying the plant legally.

According to the Press Herald:

“Unofficial results of the vote released on Election Day showed the measure passed by 4,073 votes, 381,692 to 377,619. The anti-legalization campaign gave notice to the director of the Secretary of State’s Bureau of Elections on Saturday afternoon to end the recount, which was on hold for a holiday break until January. Under the measure, the Legislature has nine months to establish rules to deal with such issues as child-proof packaging, restricting advertising to minors, and licensing.

Officials on both sides of the recount were critical of their opponents during the process, with Yes on 1 accusing opponents of slowing down the recount by not providing enough volunteers. No on 1 criticized legalization proponents of rushing to enact the law.”

The approval of Question 1 makes it legal for adults 21 and over to possess up to two and a half ounces of marijuana, purchase marijuana at retail outlets, and grow a limited number of plants at home.

Maine: Marijuana Opponents Start Recount, But Fail To Staff Enough Volunteers

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The State of Maine passed Question 1 on Election Day with a narrow margin of just under 3,000 votes, legalizing marijuana for recreational use. Opponents of legal marijuana in the state have called for a recount, a process that could take a month and cost the state an estimated half a million dollars. But opponents didn't provide enough volunteers to recount the votes for the first two days.

The Portland Press Herald reported that the The Yes on 1 campaign, which backed the initiative that appears to have legalized recreational marijuana, criticized the No on 1 side and said the shortage of counters had slowed the tedious process of hand counting ballots.

State elections officials said Wednesday the process is back on track after a slight delay at the beginning, and that state staff and other volunteers filled in when necessary. While the state asks each side to provide equal numbers of volunteer counters, there is no state law requiring the No on 1 campaign to provide a certain number of volunteers in order to proceed with the recount.

While the law doesn't require a certain number of volunteers, it would only seem logical for opponents to provide enough volunteers to actually perform the recount they want to happen.

Maine: Initiative To Legalize Marijuana Will Appear On Ballot As Question 1

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Secretary of State Matt Dunlap on Monday announced that the initiative to legalize and regulate marijuana like alcohol in Maine will appear on the ballot as Question 1.

The secretary of state set the final wording of the ballot question last week. It reads, “Do you want to allow the possession and use of marijuana under state law by persons who are at least 21 years of age, and allow the cultivation, manufacture, distribution, testing, and sale of marijuana and marijuana products subject to state regulation, taxation and local ordinance?”

“The wording of our ballot question is far more important than the order in which it will appear," said Yes On 1 Campaign Manager David Boyer. "It conveys to voters that the cultivation and sale of marijuana for adult use will be subject to regulation, taxation, and local control.

"We are pleased, as those themes comprise the core of our initiative and help explain the benefits of ending marijuana prohibition," Boyer said. "Residents of Maine will be hearing a lot more about regulation, taxation, and local control as we spend the next four months encouraging them to vote ‘Yes’ on Question 1.

New Jersey: Voters Reform Broken Bail System

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Advocates Hail Historic Reform and Look Forward to Work on Implementing New Law

New Jersey voters on Tuesday approved Public Question No. 1 to reform New Jersey’s bail system. The narrowly-worded question allows judges to deny bail to dangerous individuals, but it ushers in broader bail reform because it is linked to comprehensive legislation, already signed by the governor, that overhauls the state’s broken bail system.

The legislation implements wide-ranging reforms including non-monetary release options for low-risk individuals; a system under which pretrial release decisions are based on risk rather than resources; the use of risk assessments for suspects enabling courts to make individualized determinations of what conditions of release are appropriate; establishment of a pretrial services unit within the court system that will provide appropriate levels of monitoring and counseling for those awaiting trial.

The legislation also protects the rights of those denied bail by requiring prosecutors to prove the case for pretrial detention by clear and convincing evidence and mandating clear timelines for speedy trial.

Advocates and faith leaders across the state waged a hard-fought two-year campaign to pass the legislation and win approval of Public Question No. 1 by voters. They hailed the victory as a historic change to New Jersey’s criminal justice system.

Maine: Controversy Erupts Over Bus Ads Promoting Marijuana As Safer Than Alcohol

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A controversy has erupted in Portland, Maine, after the Marijuana Policy Project bought $2,500 worth ads on buses and bus shelters in support of Question 1, a measure that would legalize the recreational use of cannabis in the city. The advertising campaign, which promotes marijuana as safer than alcohol, has angered anti-drug crusaders.

"I prefer marijuana over alcohol because it doesn't make me rowdy or reckless," one of the captions reads, reports David Knowles at the NY Daily News. "Why should I be punished?"

"It's highly inappropriate to be promoting a pro marijuana message in a place that has a large audience of people under the age of 21," complained Kate Perkins, a spokesperson for drug prevention group 21 Reasons, reports Chris Rose at WCSH News.

The group claims the ads go beyond promoting Question 1, and instead promote the use of marijuana itself. But Portland's Metro bus authority said the ads fall within free-speech guidelines for an election campaign. Metro prohibits ads for alcohol and tobacco.

"If we do not ban such promotions, we will see a significant increase in marijuana marketing and promotion," 21 Reasons claimed in a news release. Project Manager Jo Morrissey claimed that further commercial advertising "will further erode youth's perception of risk and harm."

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