Science

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U.S.: Getting High In Senior Year - Is Marijuana Associated With Other Drugs?

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The study reveals “boredom,” “experimentation,” and “insight” are reasons for use related to increased and decreased risk of use of other drugs.

Marijuana is the most prevalent drug in the U.S. Approximately 70 percent of the 2.8 million individuals who initiated use of illicit drugs in 2013 reported that marijuana was their first drug.

Despite extensive research examining potential links between marijuana use and other drug use, the literature is currently lacking data regarding which illicit marijuana users are most likely to engage in use of other illicit drugs.

A new study, published in the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse by researchers affiliated with New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR), examines how reasons for illicit marijuana use relates to the use of other drugs individually, rather than grouping them into a single “illicit drug” group.

“Aside from marijuana, a wide range of illicit drugs are prevalent, each having different use patterns, and different effects and dangers associated with use,” said Joseph J. Palamar, PhD, MPH, a CDUHR affiliated researcher and an assistant professor of Population Health at NYU Langone Medical Center (NYULMC). “Our research helped to identify subtypes of illicit marijuana users who use other drugs, as this may be able to inform prevention efforts.”

Australia: $33.7 Million Donation For Medical Marijuana Research Inspired By Granddaughter

KatelynLambert[TheDailyTelegraph]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A pair of Australian grandparents on Friday made the biggest-ever donation to medical marijuana research to investigate its use in treating childhood epilepsy and other diseases.

Barry and Joy Lambert's granddaughter Katelyn suffers up to 1,400 seizures a day, and medicinal cannabis could save her life, reports Alicia Wood at The Daily Telegraph. Lambert said he and his wife made the $33.7 million gift after seeing Katelyn respond to cannabis treatments for her debilitating condition, Dravet syndrome.

"Our vision is to make Australia a world leader in researching how to realize the powerful medicinal potential of the cannabis plant," Lambert said. "The experience of our granddaughter, who suffers debilitating epilepsy, has opened our eyes to the extraordinary possibility of cannabinoids treating not only her condition but a range of chronic illnesses that often don’t respond to conventional treatments.

“We believe this investment in the future of Australian science and medicine will provide the much-needed evidence to rapidly advance the use of medicinal cannabinoids in the treatment of childhood epilepsy and other serious illnesses,” Lambert said.

Israel: Researchers Eliminate 60% of Myeloma Cells With Cannabis-Based Treatments

OneWorldCannabis(logo)

As the possibilities for cannabis-based treatments continue to make headlines in the medical world, One World Cannabis, a medical-cannabis research company, has announced that the initial results of its landmark study on treating multiple myeloma with cannabis-based solutions were extremely promising. After a series of tests using cannabis-based treatments, researchers were able to eradicate 60 percent of multiple myeloma cells.

The disease is one of the most deadly hematologic cancers and individuals diagnosed with the disease often have about a 50 percent survival rate.

OWC Pharmaceutical Research Corp. on Wednesday announced that its wholly owned subsidiary, One World Cannabis Ltd., an Israel-based developer of cannabinoid-based therapies targeting a variety of different indications, has received the first basic science study (lab) results on the effect of several combination of cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226.

Based on the results, One World Cannabis will submit the clinical trial protocol to the IRB (Helsinki committee). The company expects to receive institutional review board approval for the study within 6-9 weeks.

The OWC multiple myeloma study was done by three repetitive tests on the effect of cannabis extract with various combination ratios of THC/CBD and pure THC and CBD (50 percent concentration). The results present more than 60 percent malignant cell death. More results of pure THC and CBD are under further analysis.

Study: Medical Marijuana Laws Do Not Lead To Increases In Teen Use

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Lancet Study Dismantles Main Argument of Opponents of Medical Marijuana

A new Columbia University study published in Lancet Psychiatry shows that teen marijuana use does not increase after the passage of medical marijuana laws. The study, led by Dr. Debra Hasin, looked at past-30-day marijuana use among over one million adolescents over a 24-month period.

While rates of use were higher to begin with in medical marijuana states, rates of use did not change after laws went into effect.

This is not the first study to find that medical marijuana laws do not have an impact on teen use – but this study is the most comprehensive and valid, given the large sample size, the long study period and adjusting results for other factors that might contribute to marijuana use, such as gender, age and geographic location. Additionally, the study was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, which has been critical of the impact of medical marijuana laws on teen use.

“Medical marijuana relieves pain and suffering for millions and does not lead to an increase in teen marijuana use,” said Amanda Reiman, manager of Marijuana Law and Policy for the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) and professor at UC Berkeley. “This should end the ‘What About The Kids’ argument used by opponents who try prevent access to marijuana for the sick and dying.”

Global: Ancient Humans Probably Smoked Marijuana For Health

PygmyMarijuana[Pinterest]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Ancient hunter-gatherers who depended on the wild, before agriculture was invented, not only forged for food -- they foraged for marijuana, according to science.

The medical benefits of cannabis, while still officially denied by the U.S. government (which holds a patent on the damn stuff) was well understood by our forebears, probably instinctively, at least 12,000 years ago, reports Stephen Morgan at Digital Journal.

A team of anthropologists from Washington State University, led by Dr. Ed Hagen, wanted to see how cultures worldwide used cannabis historically. They especially wanted to see if ancient marijuana users were subconsciously influenced more by health reasons than just wanting to get high.

Humans throughout history have probably sought out cannabis, in the same way we searched out foods beneficial to us, according to Dr. Hagen.

"In the same way we have a taste for salt, we might have a taste for psychoactive plant toxins, because these things kill parasites. If you look at non-human animals, they do the same thing, and what a lot of biologists think is they're doing it to kill parasites," Dr. Hagen said, reports Ellie Zolfagharifard at the Daily Mail.

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