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U.S.: Expert Warns Marijuana Genetic Patents Are Coming Soon

ReggieGaudino

In a recent podcast episode for Ganjapreneur.com, Reggie Gaudino of Steep Hill labs recently joined show host Shango Los for an interview to discuss the science and politics behind cannabis breeding, the realities of patenting cannabis strains, and how "Big Marijuana" is going to change the landscape of cannabis business when Federal law changes.

Reggie Gaudino is vice president of scientific operations and director of intellectual property at Steep Hill, a California-based laboratory that offers cannabis testing services.

According to Reggie, cannabis patents are not only on the horizon, but they're actually closer than most people would imagine. He predicts that the moment cannabis shifts away from its current Schedule I restrictions, major corporations like Monsanto and Dow Agrosciences are going to step in and attempt to overtake the market.

"The message that Steep Hill is trying to get out is... if you’re a breeder, the best thing that you can be doing right now is breeding your butt off," Reggie said. "The only thing left then is to put your stake in the ground and to really protect your strains so that when everything that’s on the shelves now becomes open source, you have something better to offer the community."

The full podcast episode is available via iTunes and at Ganjapreneur.com, where there are also full transcripts of this and previous episodes.

Washington: Marijuana Industry Recruiter Reveals How To Apply For Cannabis Jobs

DavidMurétViridianStaffing[Ganjapreneur]

With the legalization of cannabis in several states in the U.S., a viable commercial market has risen out of an industry which once operated entirely in the shadows. As investors and entrepreneurs pursue profits in the new legal industry, employment opportunities have begun to open up for everyday citizens as well.

In their latest podcast, Ganjapreneur has interviewed David Murét of Viridian Staffing, a Washington-based recruiting agency working to connect employers with job-seekers in the cannabis industry, about the emergence of these cannabis careers and the people who are seeking them out. Viridian has been hired by companies to find and place candidates in job roles ranging from entry-level to executive, in every sector and niche of the marijuana market.

In the podcast, Murét and show host Shango Los discuss what types of jobs cannabis companies are hiring for and what steps an average person can take to find employment with such a company.

"People will be very often surprised to find out that their skill sets are relevant to the cannabis industry," David said. "These companies need the same type of support as any other company does, be it sales, marketing, social media...almost anyone can find a home in this industry if they’re willing to put in the time and the effort."

Washington: I-502 Marijuana Production Manager Advocates GMO Cannabis

TylerMarkwart[Facebook]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

One supposes it was predictable. A production manager at a licensed Washington recreational marijuana producer, has endorsed genetically modified marijuana in an interview with the CannabisRadio.com network.

Tyler Markwart, founder of Allele Seeds and production manager/breeder at Monkey Grass Farms, is a proponent of GMO cannabis and argued in the interview that many potential benefits could come from genetically modifying strains.

"The idea is you could remove the cold resistant genes from a salmon and put it in a plant, allowing that plant to exhibit better growth conditions under freezing temperatures or near freezing temperatures," said Markwart, who said he studied organic agriculture "and philosophy" at Washington state University, and writes for High Times, the Northwest Leaf, Ladybud and Culture. (It would presumably just be too easy to grow non-GMO, non-salmon weed in non-freezing conditions.)

"It hits really two main people when we want to talk about it: the growers and it also hits the end consumer at the same time," Markwart said. "The growers are looking to be profitable, that's mainly their goal so that they can have another season to plant another round of crop and live and pay their bills like everybody else."

California: Future of Humboldt County's Marijuana Industry Discussed

DominicCorvaPullQuoteGanjapreneur2015

Ganjapreneur, an online cannabis business resource, interviews Dr. Dominic Corva in the latest episode of its series of podcast interviews featuring successful cannabis entrepreneurs and industry experts.

Dr. Corva is a political geographer and public policy scholar who has written extensively on both international drug policy in the Western Hemisphere as well as the political economy of cannabis agriculture in southern Humboldt County. In the past he has worked as a professor at Sarah Lawrence College and Humboldt State University, though these days he is executive director at the Cannabis and Social Policy Center (CASP).

The interview is hosted by Shango Los of the Vashon Island Marijuana Entrepreneurs Alliance. Over the course of the interview, the two discuss the past and future of international drug policy, the flawed implementation of Washington's I-502 market, the impact of data-tracking on legal marijuana, and the future of Humboldt County cannabis growers.

“The biggest misconception is that legalization means that everyone is more free to engage in cannabis commerce, when in fact, legalization clearly means that new lines are being drawn,” Dr. Corva explained.

Though his work has been dedicated to aiding and understanding business interests in the cannabis industry, Dr. Corva is openly thankful for the activism efforts that brought us here: "As long as we’re not moving backwards on the criminal justice side of it, then we’re still, I think, moving a little bit in the right direction."

Washington: Farm Organizer Selling Rare Painting 'To Fund American Marijuana Agriculture'

DavidChoePainting

A legal marijuana farm organizer on Vashon Island in Washington state says he is selling a rare David Choe painting to fund his organization.

“It is a fabulous painting that I bought in 2006 just as David Choe was becoming well known," said painting owner Shango Los. "Now that he is an international superstar, I’d like to cash out and invest in American marijuana agriculture. I’m sure David Choe would approve.”

Los said he doesn't grow marijuana on Vashon Island, but rather founded the Vashon Island Marijuana Entrepreneurs Alliance which organizes food farmers and other entrepreneurs who wish to move into the legal marijuana market.

“We have an opportunity to let marijuana grow beside our traditional food crops and save the family farm," Shango said. "The only way this will happen though is with grass roots community organizing and that takes money.”

The sale of the painting will fund the continuing efforts of VIMEA, according to Los.

Along with the painting, Shango is selling a shirt he was wearing at the gallery when he bought the painting upon which David Choe wrote “DAVE CHOE RUINS SHIRTS” and an image in marker.

The eBay auction is for both the painting and the shirt. The painting has an auction estimate of $5,000 to $10,000, with a starting bid of $3,500.

“David Choe’s talents have made him a heavily watched artist," Los said. "I expect that the rare opportunity to buy an original painting by him in a private sale will draw out both avid David Choe fans and savvy art investors alike.”

The auction ends May 14, Los said.

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