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U.S.: Willie Nelson Tells U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions To Smoke Some Pot

Willie Nelson 2016

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

On May 17, singer-songwriter Willie Nelson had some advice for U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who said marijuana is only “slightly less awful” than heroin.

Sessions has also said in the past that "good people don't smoke marijuana." As the nation's top law enforcement officer, he has signaled a broad crackdown against both social and medicinal uses of the drug, which remains illegal federally.

Global: New Website Caters To Mature Marijuana Enthusiasts

CheriSicard[SeniorStoner.com].jpg

"Our joints never ache" is the slogan... I love that.

The older kids always did have the best weed, and the new website, SeniorStoner.com, believes that still holds true. Designed to appeal to the more mature marijuana user and cannabis curious baby boomer, the site covers all aspects of the marijuana experience, from health and politics, to travel and pop culture.

Seniors are America’s fastest growing demographic and the fastest growing subgroup among marijuana users. It only makes sense that the Baby Boomer generation would be open to marijuana use; after all this is their second “dance” with Mary Jane as they grew up in the ’60s and ’70s, when getting high was the norm.

While in development stages, Senior Stoner publisher Mitch Mandell and editor Cheri Sicard were questioned about the wisdom of branding the new venture with the word “stoner.” The pair emphatically defends the position saying no other word so clearly denotes a person who enjoys marijuana.

“We don’t see the word stoner as a negative,” says Sicard, “in fact we feel using the S-word can do a lot of good towards forcing people to re-examine their preconceived notions and prejudices about marijuana and the people who use it. Let’s face it, Grandma and Grandpa are not who typically come to mind.”

Oregon: Recreational Marijuana Sales Tax Begins Jan. 4

OregonMarijuanaLeaf[CannabisIndustryToday]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

All good things must come to an end, it seems, and it's the same with the Oregon weed tax holiday. Recreational marijuana consumers in the state will have to pay a 25 percent sales tax starting Monday, January 4.

The Oregon Legislature earlier this year approved allowing medical marijuana dispensaries to sell recreational pot to adults 21 and older, tax-free, starting on Oct. 1, reports Noelle Crombie at The Oregonian. But tax-free sales end on Monday, when the state imposes a tax that will last until the end of 2016.

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission isn't expected to open state-licensed recreational marijuana stores until late 2016; once that program is up and running, the 25 percent tax at dispensaries will be replaced with permanent 17 percent sales tax at recreational pot stores.

The Oregon Department of Revenue on Tuesday said they are prepared to deal with large sums of cash from dispensaries paying the new tax. Cameras have been added, employees have gotten security training, and a new "cash handling location" has been set up to accept large payments, according to the agency.

Marijuana's Schedule I classification under federal law has kept most traditional banks away from the business, fearing conspiracy charges and money laundering investigations. That means most marijuana transactions must be handled in cash.

Oregon: Marijuana Dispensaries Report Massive Recreational Sales

OregonLegalMarijuanaSales[KATU.com]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Medical marijuana dispensaries in Oregon remained busy throughout the weekend after opening their doors to recreational customers on Thursday. The Oregon Legislature approved tax-free recreational sales through medicinal cannabis dispensaries through the end of the year.

Many of the shops opened at the stroke of midnight Thursday morning and were greeted with long lines of excited customers, reports Ted Shorack at The Bend Bulletin. Those lines continued all weekend, with thousands of customers checking out the shops.

"It was amazing," said Ben Hebert, owner of Dr. Jolly's in Bend. "We were totally busy all the time. I think we had a lot of happy people coming out of here."

Sales reached $55,000 on the first day alone, according to Aviv Hadar, cofounder of Oregrown Industries, which has a dispensary in Bend. As many as 2,000 customers shopped at his dispensary on the first day, according to Hadar.

"Our day two is bigger than most people's day one," Hadar said, reports Reed Andrews at KATU News.

Brothers Cannabis in Portland was one of the shops which opened at midnight; co-owner Nyno Thol said the shop is serving 600 people a day, about 20 times more than they usually do. "We're getting a lot of out of town folks and from Vancouver," he said.

Oregon: Activists, Consumers Welcome Historic First Day of Legal Cannabis Sales

PaulStanfordLegalizationOctober1,2015

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Oregon's historic first day of legal cannabis sales on Thursday was a success, as marijuana consumers 21 and older statewide were, for the first time ever, able to legally buy retail weed without a medical authorization.

Lines snaked out the doors of many collectives at mid-day; the Tree House Collective on NE Sandy Boulevard in Portland had line of 8 to 10 customers out the door at around 1 p.m. By 5 p.m., the line was only a couple of people, and the wait had been reduced to around five minutes.

THC owner Nathan Roszina told Hemp News that creating separate queue and retail area for recreational customers was key in keeping down waiting times. Roszina said the shop wanted to address concerns from some patients that they might be subjected to long wait times due to the influx of recreational customers.

According to Roszina, the normal number of medicinal cannabis patients showed up for medicine; add to that all the first-time recreational customers, and it was a busy day. "It's been very steady all day long," Nathan told me. Many of the recreational customers, though, were curiosity seekers, according to Roszina, and only wanted to buy a gram or two.

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