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South Carolina: Senate Panel Unanimously Approves Medical Marijuana Bill

SouthCarolinaMedicalMarijuana(USE)[CannabisCountry]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Medical marijuana should be legal in South Carolina, a panel of state senators concluded on Thursday.

The Senate Medical Affairs Subcommittee voted unanimously to advance a bill that would legalize marijuana for certain medical conditions in the state, reports Cassie Cope at The State.

The proposal's approval sends a strong signal that legalizing medical marijuana is something the General Assembly wants to do, according to state Senator Tom Davis (R-Beaufort), the bill's chief sponsor.

But predictably mired in the unhappy past, South Carolina Law Enforcement Division Chief Mark Keel told senators he's against the proposal, which outlines proposed guidelines for licensing state growers and dispensaries.

Keel claimed the proposed seed-to-sale tracking system doesn't take into account what happens to marijuana once it's sold to a patient. He also told one whopper -- yes, the chief of the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division sat there in front of the Senators and told a big old lie. He claimed more adolescents use marijuana in states that have legalized marijuana. Unfortunately for the lying chief, scientific studies have shown otherwise.

South Carolina: Police Oppose Expanding Sick Children's Access To Medical Marijuana

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

South Carolina state Sen. Tom Davis (R-Beaufort), author of a bill which made it legal for parents to possess the marijuana derivative cannabidiol (CBD) oil to control their children's seizures, plans to introduce another bill on January 13, the first day of the upcoming legislative session, to allow low-THC marijuana to be grown in the state. But state law enforcement has already expressed opposition to the plan.

Davis said he first heard about CBD oil from a constituent whose granddaughter in Charleston was having 80 to 90 seizures an hour, reports Steve Jones at The State. Within two weeks of his constituent's granddaughter getting CBD oil, Davis said, the seizures were reduced by 80 percent.

After researching, Sen. Davis learned that CBD oil had helped people in other states, so he introduced a bill which passed and was signed into law by Gov. Nikki Haley last summer. The new law made legal the possession of CBD oil to treat children with uncontrollable epileptic seizures, as long as it was authorized by a physician.

The bill limits the amount of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that can be in the oil (THC is the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana). It is limited by the bill to just 0.09 percent, far below what is needed to produce a high.

South Carolina: Legislative Panel Hears Pleas For Clarity On CBD-Only Medical Marijuana Law

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

South Carolina lawmakers earlier this year passed one of those "CBD only" bills that allow parents to possess cannabidiol oil, derived from the marijuana plant, for treatment of epileptic seizures. But CBD oil can't be legally made in South Carolina, and it's against federal law to transport it across state lines, so a new Medical Marijuana Study Committee is working out the details of how, exactly, to implement their new law.

That committee met for the first time on Wednesday at the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia, reports Robert Kittle at WSPA.

CBD oil doesn't have the mind-altering effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the which gets users high. As written, South Carolina's CBD-only law is just for patients in a clinical trial to treat epilepsy, and it provides no way for them to legally obtain the oil.

Janel Ralph of Myrtle Beach, whose five-year-old daughter Harmony has lissencephaly, which causes seizures, wants the law expanded so that it's not just a clinical trial and not just for epilepsy. She said the law, as written, doesn't really help.

"You're saying you can get it," she said. "You're saying you can give it to your child, and yes we're going to let you do this. But then they're not giving you any way to actually get it legally."

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