THC

United States: Cannabis Is Safer Than Opioids, According To Several Studies

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By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

In the midst of an opioid epidemic in the United States, research studies show that using cannabis to treat chronic pain is a safer, less addictive alternative to narcotics.

In 2014, in a study conducted by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers found that “in states where medical cannabis is legal to manage chronic pain and other conditions, the annual number of deaths from prescription drug overdose is 25 percent lower than in states where cannabis use is illegal. The study was published in the Aug. 25th issue of JAMA Internal Medicine.

Israel: Cannabis Can Help Heal Bone Fractures, According To Study

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Cannabidiol, a Major Non-Psychotropic Cannabis Constituent Enhances Fracture Healing and Stimulates Lysyl Hydroxylase Activity in Osteoblasts

According to the research, the administration of the non-psychotropic component significantly helps heal bone fractures

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

Cannabis was used as a medical remedy by societies around the world for centuries. Therapeutic use of cannabis was banned in most countries in the 1930s and '40s due to reefer madness campaigns without merit. Significant medical benefits of cannabis in alleviating symptoms of such diseases as Parkinson's disease, cancer, multiple sclerosis and post-traumatic stress disorder are being discovered by researchers throughout the world.

United Kingdom: Liberal Democrats Add Marijuana Legalization To Platform

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Liberal Democratic leaders in the United Kingdom announced Friday that they plan on pushing for marijuana regulation and taxation as part of their political platform. Research by the liberal Democrats revealed that 87,247 police caseloads related to cannabis were opened in 2015, equaling an estimated 1,044,180 police hours and £31 million (more than USD$40 million) in enforcement, the Independent reports.

“The honest and pragmatic response is to take responsibility for this situation and regulate the market,” the manifesto states. “Liberal Democrats will take back control from the criminal gangs and protect young people by introducing a legal, regulated market for cannabis.”

Marijuana is a Class B substance in the U.K. and possession carries a five-year jail term. Dealers can be sentenced to up to 14 years.

The party's plan would legalize cannabis use for adults 18 and over, would limit THC content, and would require that all marijuana products contain CBD. The party says that "skunk" (marijuana that has been bred to remove most, or all, CBD) is responsible for harming the “mental and physical health” of youth.

“The current approach is a disaster for young people…There are no age checks, and no controls on quality or strength,” the party contends. “‘Skunk’ is widespread and the only ID you need to buy it is a £20 note.”

Mexico: Lawmakers Approve Legislation To Legalize Medical Marijuana

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Lawmakers in Mexico have approved the legalization of medical marijuana products. President Enrique Peña Nieto, who has spoken in favor of the measure, must sign it to make it official.

The measure authorizes the Health Ministry to design regulations for the use, importation, and production of pharmaceutical products derived from CBD-dominant/low-THC cannabis. Presently, CBD-infused products may be imported into the country on a case by case basis.

The personal possession of up to five grams of cannabis was decriminalized by Mexican lawmakers in 2009. President Nieto proposed legislation last year to increase this threshold to one ounce.

In 2015, Mexico's Supreme Court ruled that federal anti-drug laws should not trump individuals' rights to grow and consume marijuana for their own personal use.

Germany: Study Shows Marijuana Could Help Reverse Brain Aging

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Researchers from Germany's University of Bonn report that low doses of THC can help reverse some of the effects of brain aging and assist in restoring memory. Colleagues from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel agree with them according to a study published in the journal Nature Medicine. The researchers used mice in the studies, and found that old animals were able to regress to the state of two-month-old mice with prolonged low-dose THC treatments.

“The treatment completely reversed the loss of performance in the old animals,” Andreas Zimmer, from the Institute of Molecular Psychiatry at the University of Bonn and member of the Cluster of Excellence ImmunoSensation, said in a Neuroscience News report. “With increasing age, the quantity of the cannabinoids naturally formed in the brain reduces. When the activity of the cannabinoid system declines, we find rapid aging in the brain.”

Colorado: NFL Players Fight Pain With Medical Marijuana

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Nine former professional football players, all members of the Denver Broncos Alumni Association, met recently at CW Hemp offices in Boulder, CO for a tour and a firsthand lesson on the potential benefits of the marijuana plant. They all suffer daily from aches and pains that are a result of the combined nearly 700 NFL games in which they have played.

“Every day, I wake up in pain, from my ankles to my neck,” said Ebenezer Ekuban, 40, who played defensive end for nine NFL seasons. “It’s part of the territory. I know what I signed up for.”

Football players have treated pain for years with over-the-counter anti-inflammatories, powerful prescription painkillers, and alcohol. One study says that retired NFL players use opioids at four times the rate of the general population. Marijuana advocates say there's a safer, healthier alternative available.

“This pain is never going away. My body is damaged,” said Eugene Monroe, 30, who was released by the Baltimore Ravens last year just three weeks after becoming the first active player to publicly call on the NFL to permit medical marijuana. “I have to manage it somehow. Managing it with pills was slowly killing me. Now I’m able to function and be extremely efficient by figuring out how to use different formulations of cannabis.”

Georgia: GOP Rep. Allen Peake Supplying Low-THC Oils To State's Registered Patients

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Republican Rep. Allen Peake is supplying low-THC cannabis oils to Georgia patients due to the state's limited laws that allow them to possess the products but offer no way for them to cultivate, import, or purchase them, the Associated Press reports. Peake, a major advocate for Georgia's medical marijuana law, has helped families move to Colorado in the past so they would have legal access to medical marijuana treatments.

“We’re going to do whatever it takes to be able to help get product to these families, these citizens who have debilitating illnesses,” Peake said in the report. He added that he doesn’t know , and doesn’t ask, who delivers the boxes of cannabis oil to his Macon office.

He said that he makes a donation to a medical cannabis research foundation in Colorado each time a box is delivered, and that the donations total about $100,000 per year. Peake is allowed to legally possess the oil because he has obtained a medical marijuana card from the Georgia Department of Public Health, despite the fact that he is not considered a qualified patient under the state’s rules.

In Georgia, about 1,300 patients are enrolled in the state program and, aside from Peake, their only option to obtain the oil is online, which is against federal law.

Nevada: Senate Passes Four Cannabis-related Bills, One Banning Candy

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Nevada's Senate passed four marijuana-related bills recently: one that would allow cannabis clubs, one dealing with cannabis product packaging, one that would allow the governor to work with state tribes interested in the cannabis industry, and a measure that would allow medical marijuana to be used to treat opioid addiction, according to the Reno Gazette-Journal.

Provisions in the packaging bill would ban cannabis-infused products containing sugar, except for baked goods. Industry leaders argue that the bill's definition of "candy" is too broad.

“Candy,” according to the bill text, is defined as “a product which contains sugar and is produced in the shape of a cartoon, character, mascot, action figure, human balloon (sic), fruit or toy or any other shape determined by the Division [of Public and Behavioral Health] to be likely to appeal primarily to children.”

The packaging bill also includes a requirement for childproof containers and requirements for THC content labeling.

The bill dealing with state tribes would require that tribal cannabis regulations be as strict as state regulations. The cannabis club legislation would allow businesses and special events to apply for a license to allow marijuana on their premises, subject to some zoning restrictions.

Kentucky: Officials Burn Commercial Hemp With Too Much THC

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Kentucky agriculture officials say the hemp destroyed Thursday for containing too much of the psychoactive compound THC was a fraction of the hemp crop being grown in the state.

The state agriculture department says the THC level exceeded 0.3 percent, which is more than the legal limit set by Congress.

THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the compound that gives marijuana users a high.

Hemp and marijuana are the same species, but hemp usually has a very small amount of THC.

Lyndsey Todd grew the hemp in greenhouses in Pulaski County. Todd cultivated most of the hemp so it could be turned into medicine. Todd says her product is not psychoactive and that the 0.3 percent THC limit is an "unrealistic number."

Brent Burchett, director of plant marketing for the state agriculture department, says the state was bound by law to destroy the 100 pounds (45 kilograms) in question because four separate tests concluded its THC level exceeded 0.3 percent, the limit set by Congress and followed by the state.

Ontario: Cannabis Culture Dispensary Back In Business One Day After Police raid

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The Cannabis Culture marijuana dispensary in Ottawa, Ontario reopened recently one day after a police raid had closed it down.

The shop had just opened about three weeks ago.

Police arrested five men at the shop Thursday morning and charged them with five counts of possessing a Schedule II substance for the purpose of trafficking (marijuana, THC oil, THC shatter, hashish and CBD oil) and one count of possessing the proceeds of crime under $5,000.

A spokesman for Cannabis Culture said Thursday night that the shop would reopen as soon as possible.

Customers were visiting the shop again by 10:30 am Friday.

Activists Marc and Jodie Emery, the couple that founded Cannabis Culture, have been granted bail.

Marc Emery faces 15 charges, including conspiracy to commit an indictable offence, trafficking, possession for the purpose of trafficking, and possession of proceeds of crime, while Jodie Emery is charged with five similar counts.

Georgia: House Passes Medical Marijuana Expansion

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The Georgia House on Wednesday backed a broad expansion of the state's medical marijuana law.

House Bill 65, sponsored by state Rep. Allen Peake, R-Macon, would double the list of illnesses and conditions eligible for treatment with medical marijuana in Georgia to include AIDS, Alzheimer’s disease, autism, autoimmune disease, epidermolysis bullosa, HIV, peripheral neuropathy and Tourette’s syndrome.

The bill will remove a one-year residency requirement.

It will also allow people with registration cards from other states with similar low-THC cannabis oil laws to also possess the oil in Georgia.

Under Georgia’s 2015 law, patients and, in the case of children, families who register with the state are allowed to possess up to 20 ounces of cannabis oil to treat severe forms of eight specific illnesses, including cancer, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy.

The oil can have no more than 5 percent THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the component of marijuana that causes a "high."

Federal officials still consider the oil an illegal drug.

Rhode Island: Growing Hemp Becomes Legal

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

A new law takes effect Sunday that will allow people in Rhode Island to obtain a license to grow hemp for oil, clothing, fiber, food, and other commercial products.

Lawmakers proposed the bill initially to allow members of the Narragansett Indian Tribe to cultivate hemp, but the language was expanded to include any licensed grower.

Gov. Gina Raimondo signed the legislation into law in July. It also allows universities to grow hemp for research and educational purposes.

Industrial hemp is a cousin of marijuana that contains a lower concentration of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

Although the United States imports about half a billion dollars of hemp annually from other countries, mainly Canada and China, the plant remains illegal for most of its own farmers to grow.

California: Cops Testing New Marijuana Breathalyzer

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Hound Labs, an Oakland-based scientific-device company announced Tuesday that law enforcement officers have begun testing a new hand-held marijuana breathalyzer, the first of its type to be able to detect edible pot products on a driver's breath.

Hound Labs was founded in founded in 2014 by Dr Mike Lynn, an emergency room doctor and reserve deputy sheriff with the Alameda County Sheriff's Office and company CEO.

The company dubbed its marijuana detector The Hound, and say it promises to give law enforcement immediate measurements for the few hours that tetrahydrocannabinol - the principal ingredient in marijuana - is present in a person's breath.

Until now, police had been forced to rely on blood, saliva, or urine tests. Hound Labs said in a press release that these tests are 'unhelpful' because these results measure the presence of marijuana for days after the suspect is impaired.

Dr Lynn explained in a phone interview that his invention would prevent unfair arrests of people who may have smoked marijuana, or ate a pot brownie, legally the night before, and who were no longer impaired when they were pulled over, but still had traces of THC in their bloodstream.

Colorado: Newly Available Cannabis Tampons

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Women have a new alternative to treating painful menstrual cramps with Midol, Advil, and the like. There's a new remedy for cramps and it's cannabis tampons.

Designed by the company Foria, the "relief suppositories" made of cannabis "maximize the muscle relaxing and pain relieving properties of cannabis without inducing a psychotropic ‘high.'”

The tampons are made with only three ingredients: cocoa butter, distilled THC Oil and CBD Isolate (99.99%) from organically-grown hemp. Foria explains on its website that CBD Isolate is one of “two key active cannabinoid compounds found in cannabis,” the other being THC.

Foria says their primary focus is on relieving pain, with an intention to “share the powerful medicinal properties of this plant while utilizing modern extraction techniques to standardize purity and potency.” Creating a tampon, they say, instead of a pill, helps “deliver the medicine directly to where it is needed most.”

Unfortunately, the tampons are only available for residents of Colorado with a medical marijuana card. Fiora's site site says that it is working hard “to make Foria available wherever cannabis infused products are available by state law.”

California: San Diego Alzheimer's Researcher Calls For More Marijuana Studies

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

A group of San Diego scientists put out a study recently suggesting an active ingredient in marijuana may be helpful in preventing Alzheimer's disease.

Future research is needed to confirm the results, but one of the scientists worries those follow-up studies may not happen due to restrictions on research involving marijuana.

"To work on anything related to marijuana or these psychoactive drugs in the United States is, from a scientific point of view, extremely difficult," said Dave Schubert of the Salk Institute, the study's senior author.

"There are so many rules and limitations on what can be done," he said.

Schubert and his colleagues exposed human brain cells to THC in lab experiments. They found that by stimulating cannabinoid receptors in these cells, THC reduced the inflammation and plaque build-up that precede the onset of Alzheimer's.

Schubert said these results are promising, but to know if THC can actually keep Alzheimer's at bay in patients, follow-up studies will need to confirm this effect in animals and humans. That won't be easy, Schubert said, because the Drug Enforcement Association still considers marijuana to be a dangerous drug with no medical use.

"Best to let the science do its work and sort these things out," Schubert said.

Colorado: Group Forms To Oppose I-139, Which Would Limit THC To 16%

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A poorly drafted proposal that simply goes too far, and will have far reaching, unintended consequences harming Colorado’s medical marijuana patients, public safety, and economy

The Colorado Health Research Council (CHRC) on Friday announced that it has formed to oppose Amendment 139, a constitutional amendment that would order the Legislature to set a limit of no more than 16 percent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) of any cannabis product sold at a state-licensed retail store, while also putting packaging and labeling requirements that already exist directly into the state Constitution.

"While likely well-intended, proponents of the hastily drafted measure are suggesting that we amend our constitution in a way that would have devastating unintended consequences to the citizens and economy of Colorado," the group announced in a prepared statement.

Many Coloradans, including veterans suffering from PTSD, rely on cannabis as an effective and safe medicine. This bill would directly impact those using medical cannabis, including Jack Splitt, according to the CHRC.

South Carolina: Marijuana Infused Candy Turns Up In State

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Law enforcement officers on the South Carolina coast are warning parents after they discovered a load of marijuana-infused candies during a traffic stop recently on Interstate 95, WHNS reported.

Deputies from the Florence County Sheriff's Department said the candies were infused with tetrahydrocannabinol, THC, the psychoactive chemical component of marijuana. Officers said the candies are virtually indistinguishable from brand name candies without a chemical analysis.

They said the THC-infused candies were produced in Colorado, where marijuana is legal, but that it's not legal to possessor transport these products out of the state.

According to the labels, the candy is stated to contain 100 mg of THC.

Deputies are urging parents to be aware that these products are showing up in the state and to report any suspicious candies to law enforcement.

Colorado: Proposed Ballot Initiative Would Eliminate 80% of Cannabis Products

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A proposed initiative to install a new cannabis-related measure into the Colorado Constitution would effectively end Colorado’s successful first-in-the-nation effort to permit the sale of recreational cannabis to adults, according to industry experts BDS Analytics.

The initiative would impose limits on cannabis product format and would restrict all cannabis products to a maximum 16 percent THC content. Drawing from its database of more than 10,000 products in Colorado and its wealth of data analysis professionals, BDS Analytics concludes that products on the market today that generate more than 80 percent of cannabis revenue would be banned.

In addition, almost every edible product (which account for 11.5 percent of sales) would have to be repackaged, according to the company.

“When we first encountered the proposed language we quickly understood it would have a dramatic effect on the market, and so we immediately began a meticulous analysis of how it might change the landscape for commercial cannabis,” said BDS Analytics CEO Roy Bingham. “Unfortunately, our instincts were correct.

"Should the initiative become a part of the Colorado Constitution, it would hobble Colorado’s fastest-growing industry,” Bingham said.

Oregon: Oregrown Offers Guided Tour of Cannabis Edibles, Extracts and Topicals

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Oregrown Industries, a farm-to-table cannabis company, invites the public to a "guided tour" of cannabis extracts, edibles and other products at their flagship dispensary in downtown Bend. Beginning June 2, these products are available for the first time to Oregon's adult recreational customers.

"This is a very exciting time," says Oregrown founder Aviv Hadar. "90 percent of Oregon's non-medical cannabis consumers have never encountered these products. We know everyone has questions.

"That's why we want Oregrown to be a place where people can ask questions and make informed decisions," Hadar said. "We are so excited to about the expanded variety of locally grown, handcrafted cannabis products now available to all adult customers."

Hadar says well-made extracts offer a combination of excellent flavor, convenience and ease of use that make them a favorite among discerning consumers.

"Oregrown's hash oil is made with a sophisticated process that results in higher potency and an incredible flavor profile," Hadar says. "At the same time, depending on your delivery method, you can really dial in your dose with much greater precision than you can with flower."

Adult-use customers may purchase a single unit of extract containing up to 1,000 mg of THC per day.

Wisconsin: Judge Dismisses Menominee Hemp Lawsuit

A federal judge on Monday dismissed a lawsuit against the DEA for raiding Menominee tribal hemp grow and destroying crop.

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

A federal judge Monday dismissed a lawsuit against the Drug Enforcement Administration for destroying an industrial hemp crop on the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin's tribal land.

US District Judge William Griesbach dismissed the tribe's request for a ruling that the College of the Menominee Nation's industrial hemp crop was being legally grown and federal agents could not seize it.The DEA raided the tribe's hemp operation last fall and destroyed the plants. Tribal officials said the raid cost the tribe millions of dollars.

Industrial hemp has very little THC, tetrahydrocannabinol, the component in marijuana that causes a euphoric feeling, or a "high". It has many commercial uses from health and beauty products to construction materials.

Griesbach wrote in his decision that the tribal land's location in the state means the tribe has to adhere to state law.

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