Vermont

Vermont: Attorney General Says Marijuana Decriminalization Bill Should Include Plants

There is a truth that must be heard!By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A marijuana decriminalization bill is making its way through the Vermont House, and Attorney General Bill Sorrell wants it changed -- he wants it to also allow Vermonters to grow their own.

Sorrell said that if the state doesn't allow people to grow one or two plants, it will force them to buy marijuana illegally, reports Kirk Carapezza at Vermont Public Radio.

"I see the concern about a commercial grow operation trying to say it's all for personal consumption," Sorrell said. "But I don't think you want to foster somebody having to buy marijuana behind a bar in downtown Burlington or Montpelier or wherever."

The bill in the House would decriminalize up to two ounces of marijuana; Sorrell supports decriminalizing 1.25 ounces (about 35 grams).

Meanwhile, Public Safety Commissioner Kevin Flynn claims he's worried that allowing people to grow even small amounts of cannabis would make marijuana "more accessible."

"It's clearly just reclassifying the offense from a crime to a civil infraction," Flynn said. "I think it might be kind of naive to think that people are only going to grow one ounce and then immediately destroy the rest." (Hey, Commissioner Flynn, have you considered that might not end civilization, even if it happens?)

Vermont: Town May Allow Medical Marijuana Dispensary

Vermont: Town May Allow Medical Marijuana DispensaryBy Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Vermont's newest medical marijuana dispensary may have found a home after the town of Brandon's Development Review Board changed the conditional use of permit of a building to allow for the cultivation and dispensing of cannabis.

The board issued its decision on March 6 for the application by Alexandra Ford, on behalf of Rutland County Organics, to use a 6,700-square-foot building located at 84 Lovers Lane, as allowed by the state, reports Lucia Suarez at the Rutland Herald. The board approved the change by a unanimous 5-0 vote.

"The board finds the proposed development as submitted meets the requirements of the Brandon Zoning Bylaw and is in accordance with the Performance Objectives and Standards of the Brandon Land Use Ordinance," the March 6 decision read.

The building is owned by Chuck Mitchell Properties, and formerly housed a wood furniture manufacturing facility until last year.

Zoning Administrator Tina Wiles said people with interested party status have until April to appeal the board's approval. She said any appeals would need to prove that the board's decision results in "undue adverse effects" to the capacity of the building, the character of the area, traffic in the vicinity, Brandon's bylaws and ordinances, and impacts.

"A person cannot appeal just because they don't like the project," Wiles said.

Vermont: Bill Would Allow Medical Marijuana For PTSD

Mitch Wertlieb, VPR News

There is a truth that must be heard! A Vermont lawmaker wants to let people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder be treated for the condition with legally prescribed medical marijuana.

The idea is to help sufferers sleep better if they're plagued by disturbing dreams brought on by PTSD, and calm themselves from feelings of panic and anxiety associated with the disorder.

That's the subject of today's Regional Report, when we take a look at stories of interest on-line and in newspapers around the state. The medical marijuana story is reported by Krista Langlois in the Valley News this week. Langois tells VPR's Mitch Wertlieb that the bill is being introduced in the House by Thetford State Representative Jim Masland.


Source: http://www.vpr.net/news_detail/93215/regional-report-bill-would-allow-me...

United States: More states want federal government's OK to grow hemp

It hasn't gotten the attention of medical marijuana, but a growing number of states have passed laws authorizing the growth of hemp and are attempting to get the federal government to make it legal nationwide.

By Tim Johnson and Adam Silverman, USA TODAY

There is a truth that must be heard! Hemp can be cultivated for fiber or oilseed, and it is used to make thousands of products worldwide, including clothing and auto parts. From 1999 through last year, 17 states have enacted measures that would either permit controlled cultivation or authorize research of industrial hemp, according to the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML).

Colorado was the most recent to authorize research in 2010. Maine, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, Vermont and West Virginia have passed laws authorizing cultivation, according to NORML.

Hemp and marijuana are different varieties of the same species of plant, Cannabis Sativa. Industrial hemp has lower THC content, the primary psychoactive component of marijuana.

The federal government classifies all cannabis plants as marijuana and places strict controls on the cultivation of hemp. Industrial hemp was an American staple in colonial times. The output peaked during World War II.

Vermont: Welch joins House effort to allow industrial hemp

By Tim Johnson, Burlington Free Press

There is a truth that must be heard! Vermont supporters of hemp received a boost Tuesday when U.S. Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt., signed on as a co-sponsor of The Industrial Hemp Farming Act.

That measure, introduced five months ago in the House by Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, would remove federal restrictions on the cultivation of hemp, a crop Paul calls a non-drug variety of cannabis grown for oilseed and fiber. Hemp and other varieties of cannabis are now classified as marijuana under the federal Controlled Substances Act, and cultivation of hemp in the United States is effectively banned, requiring a special permit from the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Hemp is used to make a variety of products, including clothing, drinks, skin butters and auto parts. Virtually all the hemp used in products sold in the U.S. is grown in more than 30 other countries, including China and Canada. Unlike marijuana, according to the pro-hemp lobby, industrial hemp has a psychoactive content so low that it won't produce a high if smoked.

Vermont is one of nine states that has enacted legislation that would permit controlled hemp cultivation or research -- contingent on federal authorization, which the Paul bill would provide.

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