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D.C.: Hour-Long TV Show Examines Confusing State of Weed In Our Nation's Capital

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You can own it, but you can’t buy it. You can grow it, but you can’t sell it. You can smoke it in your home, but not on federal land.

FUSION’s Chief Cannabis Correspondent Ryan Nerz rolls into our nation's capital to investigate the controversial world of weed in Washington with “The Naked Truth: District of Cannabis.”

Washington, D.C. is home to some of the most liberal and confusing laws surrounding marijuana, making it a compelling window to the many cannabis contradictions across the country. Nerz, who has traveled to every state that has some form of legalization in the U.S., follows one man's cannabis crusade all the way to the White House, examines some of the weirdest pot laws in the country, and explores some of the special interests involved in the battles over legalization.

“The Naked Truth: District of Cannabis” premieres Sunday, May 22 at 8 PM on FUSION (channel listings). Additional reporting from “District of Cannabis” will be available across FUSION’s digital, social, and OTT channels. Watch a preview here.

U.S.: Study Finds Less Domestic Violence Among Married Couples Who Smoke Marijuana

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

New findings from a study of 634 couples have found that the more often they smoked marijuana, they less likely they were to engage in domestic violence. The study's big sample size and the nine-year length of the study make it a significant finding.

Researchers hypothesized that the positive effects of using cannabis may actually help reduce conflict and aggression. The findings were strong even after controlling for things like demographics, behavioral problems, and alcohol use, reports Christopher Ingraham at The Washington Post.

The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University at Buffalo School of Public Health and Health Professions along with the Research Institute on Addictions (RIA), appeared in the August online edition of Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, reports Cathy Wilde at the ]University at Buffalo.

Looking at couples over the first nine years of marriage, the study, "Couples' Marijuana Use Is Inversely Related to Their Intimate Partner Violence Over the First 9 Years of Marriage," found:

• More frequent cannabis use by husbands and wives (two to three times or more per month) predicted less frequent intimate partner violence (IPV) by husbands.

• Husbands' marijuana use also predicted less frequent IPV perpetration by wives.

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