marijuana regulation

Rhode Island: Senate Judiciary Committee Holds Hearing On Marijuana Legalization Bill

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The Rhode Island Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a Tuesday hearing regarding a bill that would make marijuana legal for adults and regulate it similarly to alcohol. Supporters of the bill, including a policy expert with experience in implementing and analyzing marijuana regulations in Colorado, are expected to testify.

The Marijuana Regulation, Control, and Taxation Act, or S 510, would allow adults 21 and older to possess up to one ounce of marijuana and grow one mature marijuana plant in an enclosed, locked space. It would create a tightly regulated system of licensed marijuana retail stores, cultivation facilities, and testing facilities and direct the Department of Business Regulation to create rules regulating security, labeling, and health and safety requirements.

It would also establish wholesale excise taxes at the point of transfer from the cultivation facility to a retail store, as well as a special sales tax on retail sales to consumers.

One of the expected speakers, Jordan Wellington, worked closely with the Colorado state government to establish the systems called for by the 2012 passage of a ballot initiative, Amendment 64, which made retail marijuana legal for adults there. In 2013, Wellington served as the sole legislative staffer assigned to shepherd the legislation relating to the implementation of Amendment 64 and the legalization of marijuana through the Colorado General Assembly.

Rhode Island: Billboard Promotes Marijuana Regulation, Taxation For Jobs

Regulate-RI-Billboard-IfWeBuildIt,TheyWillCome...

Regulate Rhode Island on Tuesday unveiled a billboard in Providence that informs state officials — who are considering investing tax dollars in building a new stadium in the city — of another way to attract new businesses, good jobs, and young professionals to Rhode Island: regulating and taxing marijuana.

The ad campaign was launched at 11 a.m. ET with a news conference in front of the billboard. Regulate Rhode Island Director Jared Moffat was joined at the event by Paul DeFruscio, CEO of Jennifer Rose Associates LLC, a company that specializes in packaging marijuana-infused products, and Marc Shepard, co-founder of New England Cannabis Conventions.

The “Field of Dreams”-themed ad features stadium lights shining on two young professionals standing among a small field of marijuana plants, and it reads, “If we build it, they will come… It’s time to establish a regulated marijuana market in Rhode Island.”

“State lawmakers have repeatedly said that rebuilding our economy is their biggest priority,” Moffat said. “It’s time for Rhode Island to invest in a more sensible marijuana policy. Establishing a regulated marijuana market for adults would attract entrepreneurs, create jobs, and raise revenue.

“Regulating and taxing marijuana would be a home run for Rhode Island,” Moffat said.

Legislators are currently considering S 510/H 5777, the “Marijuana Regulation, Control, and Taxation Act,” which would end marijuana prohibition in Rhode Island and replace it with a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed similarly to alcohol.

Rhode Island: New Poll Finds Record High 57% Support Marijuana Legalization

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Clergy, Political, Environmental, and Women’s Organizations Join the Coalition Backing S 510/H 5777

A record-high 57 percent of Rhode Island voters support changing state law to regulate and tax marijuana similarly to alcohol, according to a survey conducted this month by Public Policy Polling. Only 35 percent were opposed.

S 510/H 5777, the “Marijuana Regulation, Control, and Taxation Act,” would allow adults 21 and older to possess of up to one ounce of marijuana and grow one mature marijuana plant in an enclosed, locked space. It would create a tightly regulated system of licensed marijuana retail stores, cultivation facilities, and testing facilities and direct the Department of Business Regulation to create rules regulating security, labeling, and health and safety requirements.

It would also establish wholesale excise taxes at the point of transfer from the cultivation facility to a retail store, as well as a special sales tax on retail sales to consumers.

“From Cumberland to Narragansett, there is exceptionally strong support for ending marijuana prohibition in Rhode Island this year,” said Regulate Rhode Island Director Jared Moffat. “The Marijuana Regulation, Control, and Taxation Act creates a responsible alternative that proactively controls for public health concerns while allowing adults 21 and older the freedom to legally use marijuana if they choose.

Rhode Island: Lawmakers Introduce Legislation To Legalize, Regulate And Tax Marijuana Like Alcohol

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State Sen. Joshua Miller (D-Cranston) and State Rep. Scott Slater (D-Providence) on Thursday introduced legislation that would end marijuana prohibition in Rhode Island and replace it with a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed similarly to alcohol.

They discussed the proposal at a news conference in the House Lounge of the State House, where they were joined by Dr. Daniel Harrop, M.D., vice chairman of the Rhode Island Center for Freedom and Prosperity, and Regulate Rhode Island Director Jared Moffat.

“It’s time to regulate and tax marijuana in Rhode Island and treat it similarly to how we treat alcohol,” said Sen. Miller, who is chairman of the Senate Committee on Health & Human Services. “Marijuana prohibition is an ineffective and wasteful policy, and we cannot afford to ignore it any longer. The Legislature is perfectly capable of creating a system that will work for Rhode Island.”

The Marijuana Regulation, Control, and Taxation Act would allow adults 21 and older to possess up to one ounce of marijuana and grow one mature marijuana plant in an enclosed, locked space. It would create a tightly regulated system of licensed marijuana retail stores, cultivation facilities, and testing facilities and direct the Department of Business Regulation to create rules regulating security, labeling, and health and safety requirements. It would also establish wholesale excise taxes at the point of transfer from the cultivation facility to a retail store, as well as a special sales tax on retail sales to consumers.

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