indian tribes

U.S.: Native American Organics Announces Launch of Cannabis Company

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The launch of a new national company which will partner and assist in producing high grade marijuana products will benefit Native American Indian tribes, according to an announcement from Native American Organics, LLC.

"The company will provide cultivation, manufacturing, dispensing, processing, testing and regulatory support to ensure transparent and uninterrupted operations," according to a Tuesday press release. In addition, the company will focus on research-based laboratory testing.

The new corporation is a partnership between Red Tipped Arrow, LLC, a 100 percent Indian-owned economic development company, and Wright Family Organics, LLC, a California-based medical marijuana research and operations organization.

According to the company, the focus of Native American Organics is to partner with and support Indian Tribes situated in states where medical and or recreational marijuana is legal. "Through deployment of state of the art technology and equipment, NAO will guide and assist tribes in gaining entry into the fast growing and highly competitive Cannabis market with a strong focus on the development of organic natural products," NAO announced.

"Cannabis has been used to aid and assist with issues such as Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome, which impacts American Indian Veterans who served our country with bravery and honor," NAO announced. "Other areas of concentration will include Epilepsy, Cancer, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's."

Louisiana: Voters Could Decide On Marijuana Legalization Next Year

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A Louisiana lawmaker has proposed putting marijuana legalization on the Presidential election ballot next year for a statewide vote.

Rep. Dalton Honore (D-Baton Rouge) has filed a bill, HB 117, to put possession, distribution and dispensing of cannabis and its derivatives on the Louisiana ballot November 8, 2016, reports Julia O'Donoghue at The Times-Picayune. Voters would be deciding not just the Presidential race, but also Congressional seats that day.

In a Louisiana State University survey last year, 79 percent of Louisianans indicated support for some form of marijuana legalization. If Honore's initiative got on the ballot and passed, people 21 and older would be able to possess and buy cannabis without criminal charges.

"If I can get it to the people, it will pass with flying colors," Honore said.

According to Honore, criminal charges for marijuana have already ruined too many lives in Louisiana. As of June 2013, 1,372 Louisianans were serving prison sentences for simple cannabis possession. The average marijuana sentence in Louisiana is 8.4 years; more than 78 percent of these offenders are African American.

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