bbc

Australia: 'Stoner Sloth' Anti-Marijuana Campaign Backfires, Draws Widespread Ridicule

StonerSloth

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

An anti-marijuana ad campaign in Australia featuring a Stoner Sloth has drawn widespread criticism and online ridicule; the campaign is being derided as a laughable failure.

The Stoner Sloth campaign, paid for by the New South Wales government with taxpayer money, was supposed to convince teens not to smoke marijuana, reports the BBC. The Stoner Sloth character is portrayed as being unable to cope with various social situations after getting fucked up.

The three original videos show Stoner Sloth acting dopey and reacting slowly to the people around, who are apparently disgusted by Stoner Sloth's dull-wittedness. "You're Worse On Weed," we are told by the ads.

Even anti-marijuana groups in Australia attacked the lameness of the campaign. “While we wish the NSW Government luck in future cannabis campaigns, the current Stoner Sloth campaign doesn't reflect NCPIC views on how cannabis harms campaigns should be approached,” sniffed the National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre, reports Mark Molloy at The Telegraph.

The NCPIC's logo was used to endorse the campaign, but it was quick to distance itself, claiming it had "no input" into the final ad.

The top trending Twitter hashtag in Australia on Saturday was #stonersloth, and it was still trending as of Monday.

Chile: President Removes Marijuana From List Of Hard Drugs

MichelleBacheletChilePresident[MercoPress]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Chilean President Michelle Bachelet has signed into law an executive order that removes marijuana from the South American nation's list of hard drugs.

The move -- a policy has been widely discussed in the United States, but hasn't yet been implemented -- comes after years of legal limbo for Chilean medicinal cannabis patients who couldn't legally acquire marijuana, even when prescribed by doctors to relieve pain or other conditions.

While cannabis has been decriminalized in Chile for some time, users, including even pain patients, have continued to face legal repercussions. As recently as last month, a mother was separated from her newborn child for smoking weed.

"They have violated my rights as a mother," said Sindy Melany Ortiz reports the BBC. "I use this drug only for the pain in my arms, it was recommended by a medical professional to me and I am absolutely not a drug consumer." Ortiz was reunited with her baby after 12 days, but only under strict conditions, reports 24 Horas.

Bachelet's executive action will probably help remove some red tape from the medical marijuana system; it could also coincide with a legislative push to legalize cannabis recreationally.

Global: Leaked UN Paper Calls For Decriminalizing Drug Use and Possession

RichardBransonDrugPolicy[Virgin.com]

Drug Decriminalization Rapidly Emerging as Consensus Goal of Drug Policy, Public Safety and Health Stakeholders as 2016 UN Special Session on Drugs Approaches

Momentum Accelerating in the U.S. and Abroad Toward Drug Policy Reforms: Marijuana Legalization, Drug Decriminalization, and Ending Mass Incarceration

The UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) appeared set to call on governments to end the criminalization of drug use and possession, according to DPA Honorary Board Member Richard Branson – but in a dramatic turn of events withdrew a briefing paper under pressure from at least one country, reports Mark Easton at the BBC.

“On the one hand it’s promising that such a powerful statement strongly affirming the need to decriminalize drug use and possession made it this far in the UN process – that in itself represents a dramatic evolution from previous decades when any talk of decriminalization was studiously suppressed,” said Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA). “It reflects both growing support for decriminalization in Europe and Latin America as well as the insistence of UN health, development and human rights agencies that drug control policies adhere to international conventions in those areas as well.”

Canada: Supreme Court Rules Medical Marijuana Legal In All Forms

CanadaCannabisFlag[TheDailyChronic]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Canadian medical marijuana patients can legally use all forms of cannabis, the Canadian Supreme Court unanimously ruled on Thursday.

Medicinal cannabis patients will now be able to legally consume marijuana, not just smoke it, reports the BBC.

Cannabis oil is now legally allowed instead of only dried marijuana flowers, making it easier to infuse food products.

The right at stake was described by the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association as the right to personal autonomy in medical decision-making – no matter what medical science may say about the wisdom of the decision, reports Sean Fine at The Globe and Mail.

The case began back in 2009 when former head baker Owen Smith of the Cannabis Buyers Club of Canada, a British Columbia collective, was charged with trafficking and unlawful possession of marijuana. Smith was caught baking 200 cannabis cookies, reports Trinh Theresa Do at CBC.

A B.C. judge acquitted Smith and gave the Canadian government a year to change laws about marijuana extracts. The case then went to the Supreme Court.

Global: BBC Asks -- Can Cannabis Oil Cure Cancer?

FullExtractCannabisOil

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The ultra-respectable BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) on Monday gave serious coverage to the wave of reports on the effectiveness of cannabis oil in fighting cancer and other serious diseases.

Chemotheraphy doesn't work for many cancer patients, and once the doctors say there's nothing more they can do, patients often turn to cannabis oil as a last resort, as a chance at life.

"Left with no options, everybody speaks about cannabis oil," said Sarah Amento, a California cancer patient. "I want to live. I have to live."

Cannabis has been used for centuries as a medicine; Britain's leading cancer research group is interested, according to spokeswoman Kat Arney. "Turning that into treatments is a long road, and certainly it's not going to be 'the one cure' for cancer, because nothing is," Arney said.

"The cannabis works," said Stefanie Larue, a cancer patient who used cannabis oil -- and only cannabis oil -- to fight her disease. "No chemo, and I only used cannabis. The tumors are gone, and the scans I have are evidence and proof of that. It's kind of like, what more do you need?"

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