SB 259

Utah: Republican State Senator Mark Madsen Advocates Medical Marijuana Legalization

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A conservative Republican Utah state senator has a “420” message for America: “It’s time to legalize medical cannabis.” In an exclusive video interview released Monday morning, Utah State Senator Mark Madsen discussed his own personal use of medical cannabis and advocates for national reform.

“We need to work from the principles of freedom and compassion and let the policy grow from there,” Sen. Madsen said. “I believe we should allow individuals and their physicians to make their own decisions on whether medical cannabis is an augmentation or an alternative to other traditional medical treatments. Government has no legitimate place in that process.”

In 2007, Madsen was nearly killed by an accidental overdose of fentanyl when a patch his doctor prescribed accidentally tore and released a fatal dose of the opiate.

Madsen was the sponsor of recent legislation in the state, S.B. 259, which would have legalized the cultivation, production, sale and possession of whole-plant medical cannabis for a range of conditions. The bill was narrowly defeated by one flipped vote in the Senate in March.

Shortly before introducing S.B. 259, Madsen travelled to Colorado to try medical cannabis, which he said provided great relief for his chronic back pain. In 2007, Madsen says he was inspired by the families lobbying for legislation passed in 2014 legalizing high-CBD medical cannabis extracts for epileptic patients.

Utah: Video Of Mormon Mom Who Used Cannabis During Pregnancy Goes Viral

TenilleFarrWithGabe[SaltLakeCityWeekly]

Drug Policy Project of Utah has started an eight-week web series to raise awareness about how local residents are using cannabis to help with serious health issues all while having to contend with the fact that they are breaking state and federal laws.

Christine Stenquist, president of Drug Policy Project of Utah, said that the web series will feature the experiences of Utahans who have used medical cannabis.

Stenquist suffered through two decades of her life with chronic debilitating pain, nausea and vertigo caused by a brain tumor and fibromyalgia. She tried nearly 30 different medications and was bedridden for 15 years.

Stenquist began using cannabis therapies and is now pharmaceutical-free and active in her life again. “Utahans deserve safe access to the relief provided by cannabis medicines,” she said. “I don’t want anyone else to have to give up 20 years of their life because of bad policy."

The first video in the series at IllegallyHealed.com featuring a Utah Mormon and mother of five, attracted lots of attention on the Internet. In the video, Tenille Farr tells how she was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma last summer when she was pregnant with her fifth son, Gabe.

Utah: Sick Mormon Mother Pleads For Legalized Medical Marijuana In Video

TreatingCancerDuringPregnancyNaturally[YouTube]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A Mormon mother's YouTube video pleading for legalization of medical marijuana in Utah went viral on the Internet on Wednesday.

In the video, Tenille Farr of Spanish Fork tells how she was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma last summer while she was pregnant with her fifth son, Gabe, reports Kristen Moulton at The Salt Lake Tribune.

The video, posted by the Illegally Healed website and on its Facebook page, got hundreds of shares within hours on Wednesday.

Illegally Healed is for personal stories of people who have used medicinal cannabis, according to Angela Bacca, media and public relations director for the Drug Policy Project of Utah. That group is working with Illegally Healed to post stories about Utah residents who want to be able to use medical cannabis; Farr's was the first such video.

Farr was also one of the Utah residents who shared their stories with lawmakers debating SB 259, a medical marijuana bill, during the recent session. The bill, proposed by state Sen. Mark Madsen (R-Saratoga Springs), would have legalized cannabis for medicinal purposes, but the Utah Senate rejected it 14-15.

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