LSU

United States: LSU, Ole Miss, Southern University, Cultivating Cannabis

Ole Miss Federal Cannabis Plot

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

The Louisiana State University (LSU) Ag Center and Southern University Ag Center will soon be joining the University of Mississippi as an official medical cannabis producers.

Recently, the Louisiana Legislature passed a law allowing LSU and Southern University to cultivate and produce medical cannabis. The research will include extensive studies on cannabis to treat HIV, AIDS, cancer and seizure disorders.

“The medical research on this, in terms of marijuana, is lacking in general. We have a lot of antidotal information, but not a lot of real clinical studies of if you do this, you get this outcome,” said vice president of LSU agriculture, Dr. Bill Richardson.

Louisiana: House Passes Medical Marijuana Legislation

Louisiana marijuana.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

The Louisiana House of Representatives on Wednesday, May 11, passed medical marijuana legislation to allow patients access to the drug which was first legalized for medical use in the late 1970s.

The bill passed with a wider margin than expected, 61-32, and now heads back to the Senate, where the bill is expected to pass with minor change.

"The wait was excruciating, but so worth it," said medical marijuana advocate Katie Corkern, who wants to treat her son Connor's epilepsy with the drug. "I woke up this morning and was thinking, it's not going to pass because I've been doing so much research. There were people who I thought were definitely going to vote for it who changed their minds."

The legislation seeks to provide an oil derived from the marijuana plant with extremely low levels of the chemicals that make it a psychotropic drug. Doctors would be able to "recommend" the drug rather than prescribe it, so that they can avoid risking their DEA license allowing them to prescribe narcotics.

The passage of the new legislation followed much debate. Many expressed concern that medical marijuana is a path to full legalization, which the bill's author, Fred Mills, has denied. Mills, a Republican, has said the bill is tightly written to prevent recreational use.

Louisiana: Residents' Tolerant Views On Marijuana Not Reflected By Harsh State Laws

LousianaStateOutlineWithHandcuffsAndPotLeaf

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Louisiana residents have a much more relaxed and tolerant approach toward marijuana than is reflected by their state's harsh laws, according to a statewide survey conducted by Louisiana State University this winter.

The university asked about three different marijuana polices, reports Julia O'Donoghue at The Times-Picayune.

First of all, the survey found that a majority of Louisianans oppose legal marijuana for personal use. Fifty-two percent of state residents still oppose legalizing cannabis for recreational use, but the gap between those who don't want to legalize and those who support it -- at 45 percent -- is shrinking.

In 2013, 56 percent said they opposed legalization, and 42 percent said they supported it, a gap of 14 points. Now, that gap has shrunk to just a seven-point difference.

Young adults ages 18-29 in Louisiana support legal marijuana, with 68 percent supporting and 32 percent opposed.

One state lawmaker has filed legislation to put possession, distribution and dispensing of cannabis on the Louisiana ballot on November 8, 2016. Rep. Dalton Honore (D-Baton Rouge) said voters should get to decide whether pot becomes legal.

Secondly, the survey found that most Louisiana residents support medical marijuana. Sixty percent support medicinal pot, but for some reason that number has shrunk since last year, when 79 percent said they supported it.

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