carlos alfaro

Arizona: Marijuana Initiative Backers Encourage Business Leaders To Consider Economic Benefits

ArizonaRegulateMarijuanaLikeAlcohol2016

Prior to an annual Chamber of Commerce event on Wednesday, backers of a 2016 ballot initiative to end marijuana prohibition in Arizona will encourage business leaders to consider the economic benefits of regulating and taxing marijuana in the state.

The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol will hold a news conference at 10 a.m. MST on January 6, outside the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry Legislative Luncheon in Phoenix (northeast corner of N. 3rd and E. Van Buren streets).

Campaign leaders will have a sign and distribute handouts that invalidate opponents’ claims that regulating marijuana for adult use will be bad for business in Arizona.

“Regulating marijuana like alcohol would bolster our state’s economy with new tax revenue, new jobs, and new business opportunities,” said campaign chairman J.P. Holyoak. “Business leaders typically recognize the value of a legal and regulated alcohol market for adults. Our initiative would establish a similar system but for an objectively less harmful product.

“Since Colorado made marijuana legal for adults, its economy has improved dramatically and at a far greater rate than most other states,” Holyoak said. “Opponents of that law claimed it would be bad for business, and that claim has proven to be entirely unfounded.”

The following facts will be included in the handout distributed to attendees:

Arizona: Ballot Initiative To Legalize, Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Filed

Arizona-LegalizeIt.RegulateIt.TaxIt.GrowTheEconomy.

A statewide ballot initiative to legalize, regulate and tax marijuana like alcohol in Arizona will be filed on Friday with the Office of the Arizona Secretary of State.

Representatives of a unified coalition of organizations, activists, and marijuana businesses that are supporting the measure will hold a media availability at 1 p.m. MST in front of the Executive Tower of the Arizona State Capitol, prior to submitting the initiative to the Elections Division on the 7th floor.

“It was a long and deliberative drafting process involving a diverse group of stakeholders,” said Carlos Alfaro, Arizona political director for the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP). “There were some bumps in the road, but in the end everyone came together to produce the best possible law for Arizona.

"We are united in this effort to end marijuana prohibition and replace it with a system in which marijuana is regulated and taxed similarly to alcohol,” Alfaro said.

In summary, the Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana Act would:

• Allow adults 21 years of age and older to possess and privately consume and grow limited amounts of marijuana (it will remain illegal to consume marijuana in public);

• Create a system in which licensed businesses can produce and sell marijuana to adults and establish a Department of Marijuana Licenses and Control to regulate the cultivation, manufacturing, testing, transportation, and sale of marijuana;

• Provide local governments with the authority to regulate and prohibit marijuana businesses; and

Syndicate content