SB 964

Oregon: Stanford Urges Voters To Write Lawmakers, Protect Medical Marijuana

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Paul Stanford, director of the Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH), which owns Hemp News, on Friday called on Oregon voters to write their lawmakers to protect medical marijuana in the state.

"There is a month left of the Oregon legislative session and plenty of time to have an impact on the legislation," Stanford said on his public access television/webcast show "Cannabis Common Sense" Friday night.

"Here are a few things I hope people will testify to the M91 committee about," Stanford said."

"1) Progressive license fees. Why should a company with $10 million in income pay the same license fee as a small business making only $100,000? It will cost far more to regulate the big entities. This is also a great way to level the playing field and help Oregon grow an industry made up of small business and family farms. Progressive fees could also generate substantial revenue from the richest sectors of the new industry.

"2) Support local opt out only after a general election vote. This is the version of the opt out supported by the House members of the M91 committee. SB 964 is only halfway through the process. If enough people focus on this provision, we can change it.

3) Increase the weight limit for household 4 plant gardens. The eight ounce limit applies to the entire household no matter how many people that is. Virtually every home grower will be a felon when they harvest.

Oregon: Harmful Bill To Limit Medical Marijuana Growers Passes Senate 29-1

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The Oregon Senate on Wednesday voted 29-1 for a harmful bill tightening regulations on medical marijuana cultivation, with the claimed intent of reining in diversions to the black market.

The measure, Senate Bill 964, has encountered spirited opposition among many medical marijuana patients and growers, reports Jeff Mapes at The Oregonian. But lawmakers -- echoing their northern neighbors in the Washington Legislature -- claimed the success of Oregon's new recreational cannabis market depends on clamping down on marijuana grown for patients.

Sen. Ginny Burdick (D-Portland), chair of a House-Senate joint committee on implementing the legalization initiative approved by voters last November, claimed the "large amount" of marijuana diverted to the black market makes it harder for licensed sellers to compete, and could result in federal action against the state.

Oregon now produces an estimated $1 billion a year of "largely black market medical marijuana that ends up all over the country, a problem which is far worse than I ever dreamed," Sen. Burdick dramatically claimed.

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