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Uruguay: 3 Types Of Marijuana To Be Available In Pharmacies Next Year

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Adults in Uruguay will be able to choose from three varieties of marijuana when it starts being sold in state-licensed pharmacies next year, the National Drug Board announced on Saturday.

Each strain will have different levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), according to drug board president Milton Romani, reports Malena Castaldi at Reuters.

"There will be three options with indications about the effects of each that point beginners toward starting with the lowest level" of THC, Romani told Reuters on the sidelines of the marijuana forum Expocannabis 2015.

Romani wouldn't identify the three cannabis varieties which will be available in pharmacies.

Uruguay in 2013 became the first nation in modern times to legalize the cultivation and sale of cannabis. Authorities have developed genetically distinct plants in an attempt to stymie the black market and keep legal weed from leaving Uruguay's borders, according to Romani.

The government said registered cannabis users will be able to buy weed at pharmacies by mid-2016, when the country's two licensed growers start selling their first crop of about four tonnes.

"We want to do things right, and if it takes a bit longer, so be it," Romani said. "We have to be very careful with this because any slip-up could ruin an experience that is unique to the world."

Uruguay Recommends Marijuana Legalization To Rest Of The World

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Uruguay isn't just defending its own national sovereignty regarding its legalization of marijuana. The small South American country is now recommending that the rest of the world adopt its policies as an alternative to the War On Drugs.

The Drug War creates a "diversion of focus," according to Andres Roballo, president of the National Drug Board, making it necessary to switch to a "sophisticated" way of regulating cannabis, rather than prohibiting it, reports El Diario.

Roballo made the remarks during an international seminar on "New Approaches in Drug Policy in the 21st Century." Lawmakers from Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico and Uruguay discussed a "paradigm shift" when it comes to the prohibition and legalization of drugs.

For now, domestic growers responsible to providing the substance for registered users through the Institute for Regulation and Control of Cannabis (IRCCA) are the only ones who have profited from legalization. About 3,000 growers are operating nationwide, according to officials.

"We are telling the world that the market regulation of marijuana is possible," said Ernest Samper, secretary general of the Union of South American Nations.

Uruguay Stands Up To U.N. On Marijuana Legalization

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Uruguay has stood up to the United Nations on the issue of marijuana legalization, refusing to back down after several meetings with officials from the international body.

Juan Andrés Roballo, the president of Uruguay's National Drug Board (JND), announced on Thursday that he will present a report before the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights defending the country's legalization and regulation of the cannabis market, reports PanAm Post.

Roballo said he will urge the U.N. to discuss legalization "without taboos," reports El Pais.

"Uruguay has embarked on a different path," Roballo said. "Not only have we made proposals; we have also taken effective, concrete measures in a different sense."

Roballo added that the whole world is watching Uruguay, and emphasized the "special commitment" the country has to run a successful legalization process.

The U.N., meanwhile, claims the legalization law approved by Uruguay "is incompatible with what is stipulated in the 1961 Convention," referencing the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, an international treaty restricting the production, manufacture, export, import, and distribution of various drugs.

Uruguay's decision to legalize cannabis has "kicked the hornet's nest," according to JND Secretary Milton Romani.

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