clackamas county

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Oregon: Clackamas County Sheriff Warns About 'Driving On Marijuana'

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The Clackamas County, Oregon Sheriff's Department on Thursday -- the first day of commercial sales to adults of cannabis concentrates, edibles and topicals under state legalization -- warned drivers not to operate motor vehicles while "impaired on marijuana."

"The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office would like to remind people to use marijuana in a responsible manner," the department's prepared statement reads. "Additionally, operating a vehicle after consuming marijuana in any fashion is just as dangerous and illegal as driving while drunk.

"Marijuana is a substance that can adversely impair a person’s ability to safely drive a motor vehicle and can contribute to crashes, often resulting in serious injuries and even death," the release from Sheriff Craig Roberts' office claims. "Marijuana can impair the user for a period of up to 24 hours — so please plan ahead to have a sober driver or a place to stay the night.

"During this upcoming weekend, the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office will be joining other law-enforcement agencies in providing enhanced patrols in order to ensure the continued safety of the citizens we serve," the release reads. "Between June 2 and June 5, deputies assigned to this DUII task force will have an emphasized focus on enforcing traffic safety laws, while also detecting and arresting impaired drivers.

Oregon: 142 Marijuana Applications Received On First Day

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Monday was the first day for license applications to enter Oregon's new recreational marijuana retail market, and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission had received 142 applications by 8 a.m. Tuesday morning.

Seventy-five of the applications came from growers, most of them planning operations in Clackamas, Jackson, Lane and Multnomah counties, reports Noelle Crombie at The Oregonian.

Oregon doesn't plan to cap the number of marijuana licenses it will issue. According to a report from the liquor commission, the state will issue a total of 850 recreational marijuana licenses by the end of next year.

Applications are being accepted from marijuana processors, wholesalers, retailers, producers, laboratories and researchers, but as of Tuesday morning, no labs or researchers had applied, according to the OLCC.

The counties with the largest number among all applicants so far, according to the OLCC, are Multnomah County with 30; Clackamas County with 18; Jackson County with 17 and Lane County with 16 applications.

Oregon: Medical Marijuana Dispensaries Struggle While Recreational Marijuana Skyrockets

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A gold-rush mentality after recreational marijuana legalization in Oregon is part of what's leading medical cannabis dispensaries to close faster than ever.

Some medical dispensary owners had hoped that October 1, the day recreational marijuana sales became legal in Oregon, would be a saving grace for struggling businesses, reports Kristyna Wentz-Graff at The Oregonian.

"Most people are hanging on until the climate gets better," said Sam Heywood, co-owner of the Portland dispensary Farma, a few days before recreational sales went into effect. "If it didn't have that horizon where the regulatory climate is expected to improve, I suspect a lot of people would have given up by now."

But Donald Morse, director of the Oregon Cannabis Business Council, is skeptical cannabis will change the fortunes of struggling dispensaries. According to Morse, there seems to be a widespread expectation of making millions off Oregon's recreational marijuana market, but insiders say factors including over saturation, bad locations, amateurish business practices and the difficulty and expenses of running cash-only businesses are leading shops to close.

Outside companies are increasingly venturing into the recreational marijuana business, as well, putting more pressure on the existing medical dispensaries: competition. "The medical market will go away within a year," predicted Morse.

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