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Australia: 'Stoner Sloth' Anti-Marijuana Campaign Backfires, Draws Widespread Ridicule

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

An anti-marijuana ad campaign in Australia featuring a Stoner Sloth has drawn widespread criticism and online ridicule; the campaign is being derided as a laughable failure.

The Stoner Sloth campaign, paid for by the New South Wales government with taxpayer money, was supposed to convince teens not to smoke marijuana, reports the BBC. The Stoner Sloth character is portrayed as being unable to cope with various social situations after getting fucked up.

The three original videos show Stoner Sloth acting dopey and reacting slowly to the people around, who are apparently disgusted by Stoner Sloth's dull-wittedness. "You're Worse On Weed," we are told by the ads.

Even anti-marijuana groups in Australia attacked the lameness of the campaign. “While we wish the NSW Government luck in future cannabis campaigns, the current Stoner Sloth campaign doesn't reflect NCPIC views on how cannabis harms campaigns should be approached,” sniffed the National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre, reports Mark Molloy at The Telegraph.

The NCPIC's logo was used to endorse the campaign, but it was quick to distance itself, claiming it had "no input" into the final ad.

The top trending Twitter hashtag in Australia on Saturday was #stonersloth, and it was still trending as of Monday.

Washington Sheriff Endorses Oregon Marijuana Regulation Measure

JohnUrquhartForKingCountySheriff

Second sheriff endorses Measure 91: “The evidence keeps coming in: Our new approach is working”

The Sheriff of King County, Washington, which includes the greater Seattle area, has taken the unprecedented step of endorsing a marijuana regulation measure on the ballot in the state next door.

King County Sheriff John Urquhart supported I-502, Washington state’s successful 2012 initiative to regulate marijuana, and he said he supports Oregon’s Measure 91 because, he said, Washington state’s regulated approach to marijuana is working.

“Month by month, tax dollars are going to schools and police, not the drug cartels,” Urquhart says in a new ad from Oregon’s Yes on 91 campaign (you can view the ad at the bottom of this article). “Wasteful arrests are way down. DUIs are down. Drug prevention programs are getting funds. Strict regulations are working.”

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