marijuana industry group

Colorado: Denver Cracks Down On Pesticides In Marijuana Products

MMJAmericaDurbanPoison[AAronOntiveroz-TheDenverPost]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Denver health officials on Tuesday started inspecting and quarantining hundreds of cannabis products because their labels listed pesticides not approved by the state for use on marijuana.

The city's move came about six months after officials had quarantined 100,000 plants at 11 grow facilities due to concerns about pesticide use, report David Migoya and Ricardo Baca at The Denver Post.

No safety standards exist for pesticide use on marijuana. Since cannabis is illegal under federal law, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which regulates pesticides, has never established any limits.

However, since marijuana is legal in Colorado, the state Department of Agriculture there has created a listed of allowed pesticides, as has its counterpart in Washington state, where recreational pot is also legal.

The quarantines were put on Mountain High Suckers and MMJ America after Denver's Department of Environmental Health late Monday warned businesses that products with labels reflecting the use of banned pesticides should be removed from shelves and destroyed, or returned to the manufacturers.

Colorado law requires all cannabis product labels to list pesticides, contaminants, fungicides and herbicides that were used, from germination to packaging.

Colorado: Lawmakers Don't Want To Refund Marijuana Taxes To The Public

MarijuanaMoney[AssociationsNow]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

One year after Colorado became the first state to allow recreational marijuana, millions of tax dollars are rolling in, just as predicted. The funds were supposed to be dedicated to school construction, along with regulating cannabis sales, but a legal complication may force the state to refund that money to the public -- and lawmakers don't want that to happen.

A strict anti-spending provision in the Colorado Constitution -- a voter-approved measure called the Taxpayer's Bill of Rights -- may require the state to refund nearly $60 million in marijuana taxes, reports Jack Healy at The New York Times.

Legislators are trying to figure out a way to keep the money, and they're hoping Colorado voters will let them. Republicans and Democrats in the Colorado Legislature don't agree very often when it comes to taxes, but it seems both parties agree they want to keep the cash, and legislators are working on a bill which would ask voters' permission to not give the money back.

"Despite our anti-tax feelings in the state, there's an exception being made when it comes to marijuana," said Michael Elliott, executive director of the Marijuana Industry Group, a Denver-based trade organization that isn't taking a stand on the refund issue. "The industry is making a huge economic impact."

U.S.: Hundreds of Marijuana Store ATMs Shut Down

MarijuanaATMBanking

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Hundreds of automatic teller machines in medical marijuana dispensaries were shut down on Wednesday, just days after ATMs were turned off in recreational cannabis shops.

The machines in Colorado and Washington were part of a network served by MetaBank, a South Dakota company which in January had warned ATM providers that machines located in marijuana shops violated federal banking rules, reports David Migoya at The Denver Post.

The machines, both cashless and the traditional ATMs which dispense cash, continued to work until this week, according to owners of cannabis shops impacted by the shutdown.

"Just like that, it was out of commission," said Andy Williams, owner of Medicine Man, a Denver recreational and medical marijuana dispensary that has an on-site cash-dispensing ATM. "I got a warning the night before saying they'd lost their bank, and that was it.

The ATM machines are the lifeblood of many marijuana shops, which are forced by federal banking rules to otherwise work in cash only rather than accepting credit and debit cards from their customers.

A number of trade organization Marijuana Industry Group's clients lost ATMs, both of the cash-dispensing and cashless variety, according to executive director Michael Elliott.

Syndicate content