ohio hemp chamber of commerce

Ohio: Hemp Chamber of Commerce Welcomes Botanical Extraction Facility

ApeksSupercritical(logo)

The Ohio Hemp Chamber of Commerce is extending an open invitation to the public and media to honor Apeks Supercritical at their groundbreaking ceremony for the first phase of their new 65,000 square foot manufacturing facility.

The site is located at 150 Commerce Boulevard, Johnstown, Ohio, 43031, and the ceremony will be held at 2 pm on Tuesday, November 25. State Representative Jay Hottinger will be in attendance along with several Licking County Commissioners and Johnstown Village Representatives.

A tour of Apeks’ current manufacturing facility, located at 14381 Blamer Road in Johnstown, along with a demonstration of their liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) extraction equipment, will follow immediately after the ceremony.

Apeks Supercritical has been manufacturing botanical oil extraction and concentration systems for the flavorings, natural products and nutraceutical industries since 2001.

In 2012, the company released patent-pending Valveless Expansion Technology (VET) for their fully automated Supercritical CO2 Extraction systems. Since releasing VET, revenue for Apeks has grown more than 1,100 percent to approximately $9 million USD for 2014 and now has more than 200 extraction equipment installations across the country.

Apeks Supercritical currently employs 15 people in Johnstown, Ohio; two employees in Denver, Colorado; and one employee in Portland, Oregon.

Andy Joseph, the president of Apeks Supercritical, is a US Navy veteran and earned his BS and MS degrees in Welding Engineering from the Ohio State University.

Ohio Residents Join Legal Hemp Harvest In Kentucky, Touting Jobs Creation, Brain Food

KentuckyHempHarvest2014

For the first time in two generations, the Industrial Hemp crop has been legally harvested in Kentucky. The hemp plots were grown in compliance with Kentucky state law and in accordance with Sec. 7606 of the 2014 US Farm Bill (Agricultural Act of 2014) that authorized hemp cultivation for research purposes in states that permit Hemp farming.

The agricultural excitement spurred some of Ohio's long-time hemp advocates to travel south to meet the farmers and gain first-hand experience with the plant that cannabis prohibition has kept out of American fields until very recently.

In votes often favoring Hemp by wide margins, 20 states have legalized the crop, defining it as Cannabis Sativa L., having .03 percent THC or less (no drug/narcotic value). The reforms are welcome in Kentucky, where tobacco growers are hurting for alternative crops.

Even with the non-drug status being declared federally, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) seized viable hemp seed en route to Kentucky from Italy, as outdated policy under the Controlled Substances Act doesn't recognize the scientifically-demonstrated chemical distinctions between "marihuana," a Schedule I narcotic, and hemp, a viable agricultural cash crop commodity. Kentucky sued the DEA to release the seeds, and prevailed in federal court, allowing the research plots to proceed.

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