election day

U.S.: 60 Percent Of Americans Say Pot Should Be Legal

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By Derrick Stanleyout
Hemp News

With recreational marijuana use up for legalization on the ballot this election in several states, a new Gallup poll shows that support for legal pot is at its highest in nearly 50 years.

The poll found that 60 percent of Americans now believe that marijuana use should be legal for adults. Gallup has been asking the question for 47 years, and that is the highest level of support seen in that time.

Gallup first surveyed Americans in 1969 to see whether they thought marijuana should be legal; only 12 percent said yes. Support during the 1980s and 1990s was steady at about 25 percent. But support for pot legalization has been on the rise since 2000.

Five states are voting on marijuana legalization this November 8: Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts, and Nevada. Recreational marijuana use is currently legal in four states and the District of Columbia.

Support for legalizing marijuana has increased more among younger people than those in older age groups, Gallup said. From 2005 to 2016, support for legalizing marijuana increased 33 percentage points among adults ages 18 to 34, compared to 26 percentage points among those ages 35 to 54, and 16 percentage points among those ages 55 and older. Currently, 77 percent of adults ages 18 to 34 support legalizing marijuana, compared with 45 percent of adults ages 55 and older.

U.S. Recreational Marijuana On The Ballot In 5 States Election Day 2016

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Nine ballot measures for marijuana legalization on election day 2016 will amount to the largest number of voters in history casting a vote to determine marijuana laws.

Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington were the first four states to legalize recreational marijuana, and now they have the chance to be joined by five more states. Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts, and Nevada will vote on legalizing recreational pot on ballot measures this year on election day in November.

Four other states -- Arkansas, Florida, Montana and Missouri -- will be voting on laws to make medical marijuana legal.

"This is really a watershed year for marijuana legalization, so I'm hoping that we'll see some big changes in November," F. Aaron Smith, co-founder and executive director of the National Cannabis Industry Association, told CNN.

Oregon: Wednesday, May 11 Is Last Day Voters Can Mail Their Ballots

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Today, Wednesday, May 11 is the last day Oregon voters can mail their ballots and expect them to be received by Election Day. After today, voters will need to drop their ballots off at a drop box location.

Anthony Johnson, chief petitioner for Measure 91, the ballot initiative responsible for legalizing recreational marijuana in Oregon, is encouraging voters to take part in the democratic process, and he's made three specific endorsements.

"We have made great progress in Oregon and we can make even more by electing candidates that understand the need to implement sensible cannabis regulations," Johnson said on Wednesday. "We have made a couple of voting recommendations, but the most important thing is that you vote.

"Cannabis law reform, and candidates that support reasonable marijuana laws, do better when turnout is high, so let's continue to lead the nation, not just with our marijuana laws, but also with our voter participation," Johnson said.

D.C.: House Republican Vows To Block Marijuana Legalization In Nation's Capital

AndyHarris(Congressman-R-Maryland)[AP]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

One House Republican said on Wednesday that he will do all he can to block implementation of the marijuana legalization measure approved by District of Columbia voters on Tuesday.

Rep. Andy Harris (R-Maryland) said marijuana's federal classification as a Schedule I drug should be enforced in the District, reports Aaron C. Davis at The Washington Post.

Harris, a doctor by training, blasted the legalization vote as detrimental to adolescents. "Actions by those in D.C. will result in higher drug use among teens," Harris told the Post. "I will consider using all resources available to a member of Congress to stop this action, so that drug use among teens does not increase."

The Congressman seems a little confused about how things work; currently, of course, black-market drug dealers don't ask teens for ID when selling marijuana; licensed cannabis retail outlets would.

Residents of and visitors to the nation's capital 21 and older will be allowed under Initiative 71 to legally possess up to two ounces of marijuana, and to grow up to three cannabis plants at home.

D.C. Mayor-Elect Muriel E. Bowser said she would vote for the measure, and would see to its implementation. She agreed with the D.C. Council that the District must now take the next step of writing a measure establishing a system of retail sales and taxation.

U.S.: Voters Across Country Accelerate Momentum To Legalize Marijuana, End Drug War

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Oregon and D.C. – And Alaska? – Pass Marijuana Legalization, as California and New Jersey Pass Groundbreaking Criminal Justice Reforms

DPA: Election Solidifies Drug Policy Reform as Mainstream Political Issue, Boosts Efforts to Legalize Marijuana in California and Elsewhere in 2016

Voters across the country have accelerated the unprecedented momentum to legalize marijuana and end the wider Drug War, with marijuana legalization measures passing in Oregon and Washington, D.C., while groundbreaking criminal justice reforms passed in California and New Jersey.

“This Election Day was an extraordinary one for the marijuana and criminal justice reform movements,” said Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA). “Oregon proved that Colorado and Washington were no flukes.

"Washington, D.C. voters sent a powerful message to Congress that federal marijuana prohibition has no place in the nation’s capital," Nadelmann said. "Voters in Florida and Guam demonstrated that medical marijuana could win big even in fairly conservative jurisdictions. And California and New Jersey revealed an electorate eager to reduce prison populations and the power of the prison industrial complex.”

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