joint base lewis-mcchord

Washington: US Army Issues Letters To Marijuana Stores Demanding They Not Sell To Troops

ArmyLetterToMarijuanaStores2015

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A letter has been sent to marijuana stores in Washington state on official Department of the Army letterhead asking marijuana stores to not sell to enlisted troops.

"This letter is to inform you that your establishment has been declarted 'Off-Limits' to members of the Armed Forces effective 21 January 2015," the letter, first revealed on Twitter by Seattle-based Canna Law Group's Hilary Bricken on Thursday.

"Forces are prohibited from entering your establishment as long as this order is in effect," readers the letter, signed by David L. Chase, Colonel, U.S. Army, and President, AFDCB (Armed Forces Disciplinary Control Board).

"This restriction will remain in effect indefinitely in accordance with established Armed Forces policy unless you agree to stop selling substances similar to marijuana to military personnel," reads the curiously worded letter. I say curiously worded, because these stores don't sell "substances similar to marijuana," Col. Chase. Sir, they sell MARIJUANA.

"You have thirty (30) days to present evidence to the AFDCB that you agree to stop selling these substances to military personnel," the letter demands, taking the "guilty until proven innocent" approach that seems to be popular among Army types.

U.S.: Marijuana Legalization Puts Military In Awkward Position

USArmyMarijuana(PTSD)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

With the number of states where marijuana is now legal reaching four (plus the District of Columbia), the United States military is still trying to enforce 20th Century drug policies of zero tolerance towards cannabis, despite the shifting sands of public opinion.

With Alaska, Oregon and D.C. joining Colorado and Washington as legal havens for weed, the army has gone to great pains to remind troops that state law doesn't help servicemen who smoke pot, reports RT.com.

The military is governed by federal laws, under which marijuana possession remains a criminal offense; use or possession of cannabis also remains a crime under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), and can result in court martial.

Each branch of the military claims to keep troops off marijuana by frequent drug testing and stiff penalties for those who test positive.

According to Army testing data recently obtained by the Washington Times, 30,836 of the 41,000 soldiers stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state were tested in fiscal 2014; that's about 75 percent. Meanwhile, at Fort Carson, Colorado, all 26,000 active duty personnel were tested.

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