larry wolk

Colorado: Health Officials Reject Medical Marijuana For PTSD

PTSD-Marijuana

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

In a shameful disservice to patients -- including military battle veterans -- Colorado health officials on Wednesday voted against adding post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to the list of conditions eligible for treatment with medical marijuana.

The 6-2 vote came despite a recommendation from the Colorado Chief Medical Officer and a panel of physicians to make PTSD the first condition added to Colorado's medical marijuana eligibility list in 15 years, reports The Associated Press.

Colorado Board of Health members said they weren't swayed by the recommendations, claiming studies on using cannabis for PTSD are lacking.

"We can't have physicians counseling people in favor of it because we don't have data to show it's correct," claimed Jill Hunsaker-Ryan, one of the board members who voted against allowing marijuana for PTSD.

The vote was the third time the Board of Health has rejected petitions to add PTSD to the list. About 60 PTSD patients attended the hearing, some loudly jeering the decision. Ironically, a few were asked to leave the meeting -- board members apparently didn't want to be bothered with the opinions of actual PTSD patients.

"They just told every patient here, 'We don't care about you,'" patient advocate Teri Robnett said after the vote.

Colorado Tries 'Good To Know' Education Campaign About Legal Marijuana

GoodToKnow(logo-CO)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Colorado is launching a major, $5.7 million campaign to educate both residents and tourists on how to responsibly use marijuana.

The "Good To Know" campaign will begin hitting the airwaves, newspapers and the Net this month, one year after recreational marijuana sales began in the Rocky Mountain State, reports Trevor Hughes at USA Today.

The "bright, neighborly" approach is designed to educate without alienating, and is not an aversion campaign, according to Dr. Larry Wolk, Colorado's chief medical officer and director of the state Department of Public Health and Environment.

The friendly tone of the ad campaign is illustrated by the spot that points out you can't legally drive a car after smoking pot -- it adds what "walking, hopping and skipping are allowed," reports the Associated Press.

The campaign appears to be the first comprehensive effort by any state to educate consumers and marijuana use and regulations after legalization. "This is still uncharted territory for us, and really for everyone in the United States," Wolk said on Monday.

U.S.: Fired Professor Nominated For $2M Grant To Study Marijuana, PTSD

SueSisley(Cannabis-PTSDResearcher)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Colorado is welcoming once-shunned marijuana researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, who in a controversial move was fired from her former position at the University of Arizona.

Dr. Sisley, who was sacked in July, has been nominated for a $2 million grant from the state of Colorado to continue her medical research, reports Nina Golgowski at the New York Daily News.

The research pioneer expressed suspicion that her abrupt termination was due to political influence. Up until now, Dr. Sisley had feared that her study of the effects of cannabis on post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, would be halted without a lab.

With the proposed generous grant -- awaiting a board's December 17 decision -- Sisley's study into the potential benefits of cannabis, especially, to U.S. veterans, could continue.

"That's the beauty of this grant," Sisley told AZ Central. "The Colorado Health Department believed in the quality of this research regardless of whether I was aligned with an Arizona university or not."

Sisley's study plans to examine 76 veterans with PTSD, half of whom will be in Arizona -- where a private donor has offered her free lab space -- while the other half will be at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

Colorado: These Are The Good Old Days - Things About To Change In Marijuana Market

WelcomeToColoradoMarijuana

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

This may be the golden age of marijuana in Colorado, and things are about to change.

Supply-and-demand is ever-so-slowly leading to lower prices on the recreational front, and legislative changes are in the offing that could make it more difficult for doctors to authorize medicinal cannabis for severe pain, reports Jeremy P. Mayer at The Denver Post. Voters could be asked to add a special tax onto medical marijuana, and there's even been some reckless talk about discontinuing medicinal cannabis altogether, lumping all cannabis sales into the recreational market.

"It is fluid," said Samn Kamin, a law professor at the University of Denver. "Everyone knew this was going to happen.

"This is the first-of-its-kind regulation," Kamin said. "We knew we weren't going to get everything right the first time."

Medical marijuana caregivers in Colorado may grow up to six plants for up to five patients, for a total of 30 plants, but some get a waiver to grow more. As of May, the state had about 5,000 registered caregivers.

A bill will be introduced in the Colorado Legislature next session to reduce the number of plants that caregivers can grow for their patients, and require the caregivers to go through a much more stringent approval process with state health officials.

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