olcc

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/hemporg/public_html/news/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 34.

Oregon: Industrial Hemp Restrictions Eased In Beaver State

Oregon State Capitol

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

Last Thursday, the Oregon House approved SB 1015A, bipartisan legislation which opens the door for industrial hemp to become the state’s newest agriculture industry. SB 1015, which eases restrictions on the sale of industrial hemp products by allowing growers to sell their crops to OLCC-licensed processors, permits industrial hemp products to be sold at licensed retail locations.

Oregon: Medical Marijuana Program Numbers Decrease, Patient and Grower Restrictions Increase

oregonmedicalmarijuanagraph.JPG

Since recreational cannabis sales became legal, the number of people with medical cards dropped from 77,000 to 67,000, according to state officials

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

Thousands of patients are letting their official Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) card lapse due to the financial cost to obtain the card. The annual fee is not worth the savings to obtain the medical card, according to several patients.

The Oregon Legislature recently passed SB 1057, which will subject medical growers to expensive seed to sale tracking. It does not allow the growers sell into the legal market.

Oregon: Legislature Forcing OMMP Into OLCC And Will Make Patients Pay For It

Oregon.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

SB 1057's latest amendments are on the schedule for another Public Hearing and Possible Work Session for the Tuesday, April 25th meeting of the Joint Committee on Marijuana Legalization.

The Oregon Cannabis Connection reports that the Oregon Liquor Control Commission shall use the system developed and maintained for OLCC licensees:

1. To track the production, processing and transfer of cannabis by Oregon Medical Marijuana Program growers.

2. OLCC may conduct inspections and investigations, including inspections and investigations of OMMP grow sites.

This means that the OLCC will be in the backyard of every OMMP grower that is growing for more than two patients.

Patient-growers will be required to pay $2,000 annually to grow their own medicine at addresses where more than 12 plants are grown.

To protest these changes, contact the Joint Committee members. Their information can be found at: https://olis.leg.state.or.us/liz/2017R1/Committees/JMR/Overview

Oregon: Dispensaries, State Work To Continue Recreational Marijuana Sales

Oregon.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

New rules affecting recreational marijuana retailers in Oregon take effect January 1.

Saturday will be the end of limited retail sales from the Oregon Health Authority, which began in October 2015, following the passing of Measure 91. Recreational sales and licenses will be governed by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission starting January 1. Medical dispensaries that wanted to continue selling recreational are working to beat a Sunday deadline to pay fees and file applications.

Mark Pettinger, spokesman for the OLCC Recreational Marijuana Program, said the organization is processing hundreds of applications from around the state.

“It’s a challenging time right now,” Pettinger said. “There are a lot of moving parts to all of this.”

Kayla Dunham, owner of The Agrestic In Corvallis, is planning a grand opening of a second location Sunday under the new law. She just received approval from the OLCC on Tuesday.

“There is always worry when what you’re trying to do is in the hands of someone else,” she told the Corvallis Gazette-Times. “And especially with these bureaucratic agencies, but every experience I’ve had so far with the OLCC has shown us they are motivated.”

“They’ve been extremely fast with their processing,” Dunham said. “They seem to have a lot of devotion to making sure things happen in the right way.”

Oregon: First Recreational Marijuana Licenses Approved

Oregon marijuana.jpg

By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Oregon has taken a big step toward fully implementing its recreational marijuana industry by January 2017. The Oregon Liquor Control Commission approved its first recreational marijuana licenses Friday, approving eight growers.

“These licensees reflect the pioneering spirit Oregon is known for,” said Rob Patridge, OLCC Chair in a release Friday. “They come from a variety of backgrounds and experiences and possess the entrepreneurial spirit of this industry.”

The licenses were issued to growers in Clackamas, Jackson, Josephine, Lane, Tillamook, and Washington counties. The growers consist of a mix of large and medium scale indoor, mixed, and outdoor operations. Once the growers pay their annual licensing fee they can begin operating.

The OLCC has received more than 900 recreational license applications so far. It says it plans to issue more than 850 by the end of this year when it assumes full control of the regulation of Oregon's recreational marijuana industry.

For now, dispensaries licensed under the Oregon Heath Authority’s medical marijuana program can conduct recreational sales to persons 21 and older. That provision expires at the end of the year.

Oregon: Retail Marijuana Rules Adopted; On Site Consumption Prohibited

OregonTheStateOfCannabis(logo)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Marijuana stores will be prohibited from allowing on site consumption, and wouldn't be allowed to sell both recreational and medical marijuana under preliminary regulations approved Thursday by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission.

More than 70 pages of rules were approved to govern Oregon's retail marijuana system once it is fully operational next year, reports Jonathan J. Cooper of the Associated Press. While medical marijuana dispensaries were allowed to begin selling to recreational customers 21 and older on October 1, they can do so only until January 1.

By 2017, all companies producing or selling recreational cannabis will be required to follow the OLCC's rules for health, safety, and security. The rules must be in place for Oregon to start accepting applications in January for licenses to operate marijuana businesses.

The rules will limit the size of growing operations to 10,000 square feet indoors, and 40,000 square feet outdoors. The rules are an attempt to control the amount of cannabis entering the legal market. "It's a really tough issue, and I don't think we have the data at this point," said OLCC Chairman Rob Partridge.

The OLCC also bans on site use of marijuana in stores. Employees with medical authorizations can do so in private, along and out of view, but they can't be "intoxicated," whatever that means.

Oregon: State Marijuana Chief Fired By Liquor Control Commission

TomBurnsOregonMarijuanaOLCC

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Tom Burns, who directed marijuana programs for the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, was fired on Thursday.

Burns saw implementation of the state's medical marijuana dispensary program, and had led efforts to establish a recreational cannabis market in the state after voters approved legalization last fall, reports Noelle Crombie at The Oregonian. Burns confirmed his dismissal in an interview with The Oregonian Thursday afternoon.

Declining to comment any further, Burns directed questions to Steven Marks, executive director of the OLCC; Marks couldn't immediately be reached for comment. Rob Patridge, chairman of the liquor control commission, declined to comment on Burns' firing, characterizing it as a "personel matter."

The position's duties will be taken on by Will Higlin, the OLCC's director of licensing, until a permanent replacement is named.

The agency announced that Burns' firing will not affect the timeline for drafting recreational marijuana industry rules and regulations.

State Sen. Ginny Burdick (D-Portland), co-chair of the House-Senate committee on implementing recreational marijuana legalization, said she was shocked and disappointed by the news of Burns' firing.

"I don't know how we're going to get through this without him," Burdick said. "He's the most knowledgeable person on marijuana policy in the state. It's a real shock. It's going to be a real loss to the legislative effort."

Oregon: Liquor Control Commission Names Marijuana Czar - It's A Former Pharma Lobbyist

TomBurns(OregonLiquorControlCommission)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission on Tuesday announced that Tom Burns, a former pharmaceutical lobbyist who now works at the Oregon Health Authority as director of pharmacy programs and ran the state's medical cannabis dispensary program, will oversee the legalization of recreational marijuana in the state.

Before working for the state of Oregon, Burns served as top administrator in the California Senate and was a lobbyist for GlaxoSmithKline, a Big Pharma giant, reports Nigel Jaquiss at Willamette Week.

The OLCC has been in charge of distributing and regulating liquor in Oregon since alcohol Prohibition ended, and now that the voters have approved Measure 91, it is now in the position of implementing marijuana legalization.

"Tom has navigated these waters before on the medical side," said OLCC Executive Director Steven Marks. "In line with Chairman Rob Patridge's direction, Tom will lead the implementation of Oregon's recreational marijuana law with a measured approach that protects children, promotes safety, and brings the marijuana industry into the regulated market."

Photo of Tom Burns: Willamette Week

Syndicate content