Israel

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Israel: Cannabis Can Help Heal Bone Fractures, According To Study

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Cannabidiol, a Major Non-Psychotropic Cannabis Constituent Enhances Fracture Healing and Stimulates Lysyl Hydroxylase Activity in Osteoblasts

According to the research, the administration of the non-psychotropic component significantly helps heal bone fractures

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

Cannabis was used as a medical remedy by societies around the world for centuries. Therapeutic use of cannabis was banned in most countries in the 1930s and '40s due to reefer madness campaigns without merit. Significant medical benefits of cannabis in alleviating symptoms of such diseases as Parkinson's disease, cancer, multiple sclerosis and post-traumatic stress disorder are being discovered by researchers throughout the world.

Israel: Medical Marijuana Restrictions Loosened, Public Use Of Cannabis Oil And Vapor Allowed

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

New medical marijuana rules in Israel will allow patients to consume cannabis as an oil or vapor in public and will reduce wait times for patients to receive authorization to use and possess medical marijuana, according to a report from Jerusalem Online. Israeli Health Minister Ya’akov Litzman

Israel is a leader in national marijuana policy reform, having decriminalized marijuana use in March. Non-medical users caught smoking cannabis in public are subject to a $271 fine for the first offense, and the fine is doubled on the second. A third offense leads to probation; criminal charges are imposed only on the fourth offense.

MK Tamar Zandbergm chair of the Knesset Special Committee on Drug and Alcohol Abuse said the policy “sends a message that a million of Israelis who consume marijuana aren’t criminals.”

The Agriculture and Health Ministries plan to provide about $2.1 million in funding for 13 medical cannabis studies that will range from biochemical and medical research to improving crop yields.

The Multidisciplinary Center of Cannabinoid Research was launched last month at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. It will coordinate and conduct research on marijuana's biological effects in an effort to determine potential commercial applications.

Israel: Medical Marijuana Program A Big Success

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Israel's medical marijuana program has proven to be a huge success in treating people for pain and nausea, reports a study presented at the International Jerusalem Conference on Health Policy.

The study is the first of its kind to examine cancer and non-cancer patients who use medical marijuana for treatment with permission from Israel's health ministry.

Lead researcher Prof. Pesach Shvartzman of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev’s Health Sciences Faculty said the vast majority of patients reported the drug helped relieve pain and nausea.

Israel has licensed more than 22,000 patients to use medical marijuana, but until now there has been no information about the users themselves.

Some patients reported minor side effects despite enjoying relief from pain and nausea. These included dry mouth, fatigue, hunger, and sleepiness. Patients were observed for two years.

More than 40 percent of patients were given a recommendation by their doctor to use marijuana, with 75 percent choosing to smoke it, 21 percent using oils and the rest vaping.

Almost all (99.6 percent) of the patients had previously found other conventional medicines to be ineffective.

Israel: Top Rabbi Declares Marijuana Kosher In Time For Passover

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By Derrick Stanley
Hemp News

Smoking pot during Passover? One Jewish leader has said it's OK.

Rabbi Chaim Kanievsky, a top Orthodox authority, told the Times of Israel this week that eating or smoking marijuana during the Jewish festival is fine. The drug would usually be banned as part of the kitniyot family of legumes during Passover, but Kaniefsky sniffed marijuana leaves Tuesday and declared them to be kosher if used medically. The Times reported that he and Rabbi Yitzchak Zilberstein said the leaves had a "healthy smell."

Passover starts at sundown Friday and lasts through April 30. During the spring observance, which recognizes the freeing of Israelite slaves in ancient Egypt, followers typically don't consume leavened grain or kitniyot, which includes corn and rice.

Kanievsky's ruling was the result of a request from marijuana advocacy group Sian.

The debate over whether marijuana is kosher or not has been playing out in the Jewish community over many years. Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, who died in the 1980s, forbid people from using marijuana on the grounds that it destroys users' minds and can be addictive. But in 2013, Rabbi Efraim Zalmanovich said medical marijuana could be considered kosher if it was used to relieve pain, the Israel National News reported.

Medical marijuana is legal in Israel with about 11,000 people in the country using it.

Global: Iceland Tops The World In Marijuana Use; U.S. Comes In #2

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Marijuana legalization has been a political issue in the United States for some time, and while it remains illegal in most states, others have softened their stance in recent years.

Colorado and Washington both passed initiatives by popular vote to decriminalize and legalize cannabis in 2012. In 2014, Oregon, Alaska and Washington, D.C., followed suit.

Many states including Massachusetts, California, Missouri, Hawaii, Maine, Nevada and Ohio have flirted with legalization for a few election cycles, with buzz growing.

The United States isn't the only country where people use marijuana legally or illicitly. In fact, it isn’t even the country with the highest reported marijuana use.

To determine the countries with the highest marijuana use, HealthGrove used data from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, which covers reported use of cannabis for each country in the last year. Although HealthGrove included the most recent data available, the year collected varies by country.

"We've ranked the list from least to most reported usage, and provide legality information for each country," according to HealthGrove.

Iceland tops the list. The Top 5 is rounded out by the United States, New Zealand, Nigeria, and Canada.

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