PTSD

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California: Marine Pushes To Be First Active Duty Medical Marijuana Patient

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

U.S. Marine Sgt. Sean Major is pushing hard to become the first active duty service member allowed to use medical marijuana.

Major, 25, has had a physician's recommendation for medicinal cannabis use since last October, reports Robert Burns at Fox 5 San Diego. He currently is prescribed more than 20 different pharmaceutical pills.

The wounded warrior suffered four traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) during his seven years of military service.

"I sustained my first traumatic brain injury in 2010 on the Pacific Rim," he said. "I've had one coming back from my deployment."

Major said using cannabis medicinally would help with his sleeping, and alleviate anxiety from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

"If I was missing an arm or a leg, you could see that I was injured, but with traumatic brain injury it's almost like your computer is damaged," Major said.

The Marine sergeant said he started researching cannabis after seeing its effect on his father, also a veteran. But he said supports only medical use, not recreational, but military personnel.

"You don't need guys high running around defending this beautiful country; I get that," he said.

Major said he has drafted a non-profit business plan to help other veterans with similar symptoms to be more self-sufficient.

Photo of Sgt. Sean Major: RobertBurnsTV/Twitter

Georgia: Medical Marijuana Won't Be Grown Anytime Soon

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Medical marijuana won't be grown in Georgia anytime soon, according to sources close to the situation.

Macon lawmaker Rep. Allen Peake, who has pushed medicinal cannabis legislation, stripped in-state cultivation out of House Bill 722 on Monday, reports Christopher S. Hopper at 11Alive News.

Other lawmakers, law enforcement officials, religious groups, and even Governor Nathan Deal had joined in an increasingly shrill chorus of voices warning against growing medical marijuana in Georgia. These excitable folks apparently believe that -- uniquely among all medical marijuana states, which are now about half the Union -- Georgia would somehow be selected for persecution and prosecution by the federal government if it dares do something really crazy like protecting sick folks.

HB 722 was widely viewed as the next step after House Bill 1 passed last year, allowing patients to lawfully use and possess non-psychoactive cannabidiol (CBD) cannabis oil. Patients were counting on HB 722 to make it easier for them to obtain their medicine.

A gutted version of HB 722, with in-state cultivation language stripped away, was written up. The gutted version also takes away original language which would have given a greater number of patients access by expanding the allowed list of illnesses from eight 1o 17. PTSD and intractable pain were both removed from the list.

Ohio: Researcher Dr. Suzanne Sisley To Discuss Effects of Marijuana on PTSD

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Renowned PTSD researcher Dr. Suzanne Sisley will be addressing the Ohio House of Representatives Marijuana Task Force and speaking to the media and the Ohio community during a Thursday press conference.

Dr. Sisley, of Scottsdale, Arizona, is a physician in the field of medicinal cannabis and will share her expertise with the Ohio House task force on medical marijuana.

She will address the potential benefits of using cannabis to treat PTSD; in addition, there will be a press conference for media personnel and others to hear Dr. Sisley discuss her work.

The press conference will be at 1 p.m. on Thursday, February 18, at the Ohio Statehouse, Ladies Gallery. Those planning to attend should RSVP to Cid Rhomberg of Apeks Supercritical, a CO2 botanical extraction equipment manufacturer based in Johnstown, Ohio.

The Marijuana Task Force testimony will be at 7 p.m. on Thursday, February 18, at the Ohio Statehouse, Room 313, Finance Conference room.

California: Veterans Don't Want Marijuana Legalization To Affect Medical Access

Weed4WarriorsProject[Weed4WarriorsProject.org]

Military veterans that reside in the state of California have come together to express concerns over the implications to them from the passage of Sean Parker's Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AB 266) legislation. Under AB 266, almost all of the donations of medicine (medical cannabis) the veterans receive would be outlawed with the risk of jail to all involved.

"Across the state of California, from growers to manufacturers, all would become unable to donate medicine," according to the Weed For Warrirors Project (WFWP). "This legislation would make it nearly impossible to provide medicine to those members of society who require it most."

"Veterans have already fought for our freedoms; most will never live a normal life again because of it," according to the Weed For Warriors Project. "They come home only to be drugged up beyond comprehension by the VA who has been working alongside big pharmacy for their medical programs. These veterans do not want to cause problems; they just want their right to choose what they medicate with without the threat of jail or losing their benefits.

"The vets of California, as well as from around the country, understand the legislation for regulation of medical cannabis is necessary, and they seek to help advance this effort," the WFWP announced. "However, AB 266, as it stands, if passed, would place the veteran population in California at unnecessary risk. They are asking that Sean Parker and his team amend this issue before it becomes law and destroys more lives than the war they already fought."

U.S.: Members of Congress Tell VA To Allow Veterans Medical Marijuana

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By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A broad group of legislators from both parties on Wednesday sent a letter to the Veterans’ Administration (VA) demanding a change in policy to allow veterans to access medical marijuana. Currently, veterans are prevented from having full conversations about medical marijuana with VA doctors, and the same VA physicians are prohibited from recommending medical marijuana, even in states where medical marijuana is legal.

“Vets have served their country, and the least we can do is give them the care they require,” said Michael Collins, deputy director of National Affairs at the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA). “It is shameful that the VA prevents veterans from accessing a treatment for pain relief and PTSD.”

“Current VA policy is doing a disservice to veterans by preventing their doctors from exploring all possible treatment options," said Robert Capecchi, director of federal policies for the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP). "We trust VA physicians to prescribe painkillers and other prescription drugs that are far more addictive and infinitely more lethal. Why can’t we trust them to recommend medical marijuana to the patients who they believe could benefit from it?

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